Definite Blunder

Discussion in 'Mistakes, Blunders and Boo Boos' started by Jennifer Edwards, Nov 19, 2018.

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  1. Dec 19, 2018 #21

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

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    I have an old saying that I used to repeat to myself

    ACCIDENTS DON'T HAPPEN, THEY ALWAYS HAVE A CAUSE

    John
     
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  2. Dec 19, 2018 #22

    ignator

    ignator

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    Yes, but "root cause analysis" typically takes a catastrophic event for engineers to see the error of their design. And as you know, most aircraft accidents are pilot error. And there is yet a system designed to over come that.
    John don't know if you worked for BAE, my first job was in an autopilot group, Collins Radio, installing our system in the BAE HS 125-800 (Proline 2 avionics system ~1985).
     
  3. Dec 19, 2018 #23

    davidyat

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    My mentor, Ray Clyde, taught me the machining basics and more. His two rules, "Machining will teach you patience" and "When something goes wrong, it goes wrong before you know it". I've been building models for over 50 years and I had the "patience" learned. The second part I learned very quickly. I was flycutting a small piece of metal on the mill at a pretty high speed. I didn't know I took too much of a cut on one pass. I heard a big BANG on my metal garage door and when I looked down, the metal was gone! IT WILL GO WRONG BEFORE YOU KNOW IT. BE SAFE!!!
     
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  4. Dec 20, 2018 #24

    Jennifer Edwards

    Jennifer Edwards

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    I'll share another horror story about taking safety shortcuts with y'all:

    Back in the early 80's I worked as a tool room machinist for a company called Solar turbine, in San Diego. We had a metal stamping department with a large variety of presses ranging from a few tons up to about 25 tons. they were used to stamp out mostly aluminium, titanium, and stainless steel bits.

    They were all equipped with several good safety features, not the least of which were two big red buttons and a foot pedal all of which had to be depressed to actuate the press.

    It was the beginning of summer, and as was usual, we hired a few kids from the area as "interns" to perform production runs on machines we would set up for them.

    On his first day a young man of maybe 17 or 18 years thought he would help increase production by taking those pesky red buttons (that forced you to have your hands clear of the dies in order to actuate the drop hammer/hydraulic cylinder) by duct taping them down. this left only the foot pedal needed to trigger the press he was working on.

    He was stamping out parts that took both hands to insert and align. Of course when he leaned forward to insert a part his foot naturally came down.... both hands at the wrist!

    I know many of us routinely defeat safety features on our machines because they seem like thay were designed by some sadist. please think twice about the possible consequences saving those few seconds before you do.

    have a safe and happy holiday everyone.
    Jenny in Bridlington
     
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  5. Dec 20, 2018 #25

    Blogwitch

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    Ignator,

    You have proved my saying straight away,

    "most aircraft accidents are pilot error"

    It can be a transistor burning out, the tip of a tool breaking off or even snow falling off a roof, they are not accidents, they will all have a cause.
    I have seen too many major 'accidents' in my life and I refuse to accept they ALL don't have a cause.

    John
     
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  6. Dec 23, 2018 #26

    GrahamJTaylor49

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    Hi Jenny,
    I did my apprenticship with Vickers and BAC as an Aircraft Toolmaker. It taught me a great deal about what can go wrong. After I left I got a job with a small engineering company
    in a little village in the New Forest called Burley. Whilst setting up a Herbert 2D capstan lathe with a bar feed I had the misfortune to not think and having set all the parameters up
    I opened the collet chuck and the piece of scrap bar I had used to set the machine up came through and stopped on the tail; stock. NOT thinking I knocked the piece of scrap bar out
    of the way with my right hand only the have the next length of bar, Hex bar by the way, to come through, still spinning, and my hand was in the way. Luckily, the tail stop was of a
    small diameter and the hex bar pushed my hand into the tail stop which went between my fingers. The hex bar still had a fairly large burr which cut into my hand and too far away
    from the head stock to hit the emergency stop button. Fortunately the forman was walking past and he hit the stop button but my hand was still trapped between the bar and the tail stock.
    We had just re filled the machine with new sudds and it quickly turned pink. The hospital at Lymington did a great job of sewing my hand back up and now at 70 years old I still have full use of my right hand.
    There is no such thing as an accident, only an incident. There is always a cause and with machines verses the human body the machine always wins. Please be careful out there and
    keep making the scale models. Soon be time for the Model Engineering show at Ally Pally. Have a great Christmas and a happy New Year.
     
  7. Dec 23, 2018 #27

    goldstar31

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    Jennifer
    You really need a Guardian Angel- or like me -three!
    On my honeymoon, I changed the flight details for some reason and the previous booking -- flipped on its back on landing and burst into flames. Everyone was burnt in their seat belts.

    Then rounding a hairpin bend in the French Alps in a December lunchtime, hit black ice and we - did an Italian Job with 5 somersaults into a frozen river . I broke a finger!

    The I was boatbuilding alone in a November and power planing a part on a Myford planer and got my left hand in the works. I was alone, wrote a message in blood to my wife, wrapped my hand in a white dress shirt. and drove to A&E, changing gear with two fingers and ended up having more skin planed off by one of the protégées of Archie McIndo who was going next day to East Grinstead as consultant. East Grinstead was the home of the guinea pigs who had been damaged in the RAF in the war and got plastic surgery.

    I'm now a VERY careful and caring person who thinks that I may have pushed my Guardian Angels to the limit of their patience. I recall that saying about eventually one's luck runs out.

    So a Safe New Year to you all.

    Norm
     
  8. Dec 23, 2018 #28

    Dubi

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    To all my fellow Posters I wish them a very Happy Christmas and a Prosperous New Year to which I add, may it be accident free.
     
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  9. Dec 24, 2018 #29

    larryg

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    Glad to hear your alright. One of the things that I try to do is make sure that my wife knows that I am in the shop and to check on me once in a while. Sometimes I'm working on some big stuff and could hurt myself. So it would be nice for her to check in every hour or so to make sure I'm all right. If no one is around then I take extra care to not take risks or do something that could go wrong and get me.

    lg
    no neat sig line
     

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