Definite Blunder

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Dalee

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Hi,

As an old and retired Medic, I'm always up for a good trauma.....

But you are a wee bit out of my old service area.

A good reminder for all of us to be careful in how we dress.
 

john_reese

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I had a hot chip drop inside my shirt. It stopped at my belt. Didn't feel good. I grabbed my belt an pulled outward. The hot chip was now in my shorts.....
 

almega

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Jennifer, you are fortunate the fabric was weak enough to fail and not wrap you up in the mill and cause serious harm. I am reminded of a young lady wearing too loose of pants near a lathe and got snagged by the chuck. Dis-asst'er. :D
 
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Thank goodness you were fortunate that your garment took the brunt. Thank you for sharing and reminding all of us that we can get complaisant.
 

nel2lar

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Jennifer,
I am glad you are alright and you are able to take something from this experience.
Happy chip making in the future.
Nelson
 

Chriske

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The are a few pictures on the net showing someone completely wrapped around a (big)lathe's chuck. It's not a pretty sight AT ALL...! If you go and look for them, you have been warned...!
Before I start my mill I always think twice and I also look for some loose parts on the bed.

Chris
 

Jennifer Edwards

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You didnt get hurt did you?
fortunately not, i was milling with a small bit, so as my sleve was winding up, i was able to hit the stop button with my free hand.

It was a real stupid rookie mistake. I have seen my share of industrial accidents when I was machining for a living, I know how ugly it could have been.
 

Jennifer Edwards

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The are a few pictures on the net showing someone completely wrapped around a (big)lathe's chuck. It's not a pretty sight AT ALL...! If you go and look for them, you have been warned...!
Before I start my mill I always think twice and I also look for some loose parts on the bed.

Chris
Chris, I once saw someone two machines away (a big turret lathe) who got their long hair tangled up. The funeral was lovely.
 

Chriske

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When I was still teaching, my motto OF COURSE was safety first ...ALWAYS..!
When my pupils were busy working with a drill-press they had to wear hairbands. Sometimes they forgot them in their locker. My answer to that was : they had to wear one of mine. I had a few in stock just in case. Only, mine were all pink colored. At first they were embarrassed, saying, sir this is not cool..!.. but in the end they put it on and we had lots of laughs... Was really funny, 17/18 year old guys wearing a pink hairband... :D
 

Dubi

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In the 1970's to save time I tried to cut through a bar of 150mm aluminium on a lathe at low speed after almost parting it off.
The hacksaw I was stupidly using shattered, I still have the scars on my left fingers.

That was the first and last time I tried a stunt like that.
 
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In the 1970's to save time I tried to cut through a bar of 150mm aluminium on a lathe at low speed after almost parting it off.
The hacksaw I was stupidly using shattered, I still have the scars on my left fingers.

That was the first and last time I tried a stunt like that.
Wow, thanks for the heads up. I use a hacksaw blade all the time with the goal of saving metal, but you've opened my eyes and I will make a safer suitable parting tool. I visit another site where the member has a neat saying at the bottom of his page "You can walk on a wooden leg, but you cannot see with a glass eye". Safety first, thank you my friend.
 

Dubi

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Wow, thanks for the heads up. I use a hacksaw blade all the time with the goal of saving metal, but you've opened my eyes and I will make a safer suitable parting tool. I visit another site where the member has a neat saying at the bottom of his page "You can walk on a wooden leg, but you cannot see with a glass eye". Safety first, thank you my friend.
Your very welcome, my good deed for the day.
 

ignator

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Posts on machine tool safety are always a good thing. My first out of school job was working as a lab technician for a large manufacture of HVAC equipment. An old timer walked by me using the drill press in the shop. I was holding by hand the work piece. He showed me his left hand, and told me the story of how he did the same. The drill caught the work piece, and as his hand wrapped around the backside of the drill bit, which grabbed and wrapped the ligament that enables your 4 fingers to pull into a fist, and removed it to it's attachment of the muscles midway to the elbow. He had multiple surgeries to give him back some control of his fingers. They all moved together as he had no individual control of them, and he said his pull force was negligible. I was 19 at the time, and it took many years to realize mistakes can be permanent (adolescents are so "smart"). So now my drill press has a 6 inch vise mounted to an X-Y table that I use for all drilling. That has shown to be a perfect arrangement for safe precision drilling.
I got bit by my lathe chuck 12 years ago. I ended up with a 3cm cut that luckily missed the blood vessels and ligaments on the back of my left hand adjacent to the middle finger ligament. 3 stitches to pull the skin together. I was single point threading, and as my Asian lathe seemed to start new threads when used the tread dial, I would leave the half nut engaged, change the spindle speed to fast to reverse the apron quick. That was my down fall, as I did a test check of the nut on the threads, and as it had a slight interference fit, I used water pump pliers to hold the nut to see if it would run to the end of the thread. I had forgotten to slow the spindle down, and as it spun up, got my left hand too close to the sharp jaws of the chuck.
 

Dubi

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Posts on machine tool safety are always a good thing. My first out of school job was working as a lab technician for a large manufacture of HVAC equipment. An old timer walked by me using the drill press in the shop. I was holding by hand the work piece. He showed me his left hand, and told me the story of how he did the same. The drill caught the work piece, and as his hand wrapped around the backside of the drill bit, which grabbed and wrapped the ligament that enables your 4 fingers to pull into a fist, and removed it to it's attachment of the muscles midway to the elbow. He had multiple surgeries to give him back some control of his fingers. They all moved together as he had no individual control of them, and he said his pull force was negligible. I was 19 at the time, and it took many years to realize mistakes can be permanent (adolescents are so "smart"). So now my drill press has a 6 inch vise mounted to an X-Y table that I use for all drilling. That has shown to be a perfect arrangement for safe precision drilling.
I got bit by my lathe chuck 12 years ago. I ended up with a 3cm cut that luckily missed the blood vessels and ligaments on the back of my left hand adjacent to the middle finger ligament. 3 stitches to pull the skin together. I was single point threading, and as my Asian lathe seemed to start new threads when used the tread dial, I would leave the half nut engaged, change the spindle speed to fast to reverse the apron quick. That was my down fall, as I did a test check of the nut on the threads, and as it had a slight interference fit, I used water pump pliers to hold the nut to see if it would run to the end of the thread. I had forgotten to slow the spindle down, and as it spun up, got my left hand too close to the sharp jaws of the chuck.
 

Dubi

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The trouble is it all happens in a eye blink or faster. Thank you for the stories, I will take double care now when machining. I have two lathes, Colchester Triumph and a Hembrug, both powerful machines.
 
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