Plan to build....steam!!

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Maxjon

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What's a good first time steam engine build??
Vertical preferred, not too small...
Any advice appreciated..!
 
This is the only beginner vertical I have plans for.
An old Raymond Yates design.
Not too complex.
This was one of the first engines my dad built.

Its a bit small, but you could put the plans on the copy machine and double them in size.

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Go to Myer's Engine. They have some wobbler casting kits of decent size that aren't too expensive.

....ved.
 
There are a number of different sites that offer free or low cost plans for steam engines. I know you mentioned vertical but the link below is a relatively simple horizontal that would be a good starter, no castings required, or you could build a wobbler if you wanted something even less complicated. Good luck and I hope you enjoy the experience.
https://www.modelengineeringwebsite.com/simple_steam_engine.html
 
Do a web search for Elmer Verbourg. He designed a whole bunch of different simple steam engines and most of his designs are available.----Brian
 
There are a number of different sites that offer free or low cost plans for steam engines. I know you mentioned vertical but the link below is a relatively simple horizontal that would be a good starter, no castings required, or you could build a wobbler if you wanted something even less complicated. Good luck and I hope you enjoy the experience.
https://www.modelengineeringwebsite.com/simple_steam_engine.html
Yes thankyou! I've been looking at those, as I have a supply of aircraft grade alloy, and some brass stock....
 
It''s not a typo you need to look at the plans more closely.

As Julius often spec's his main parts from aluminium which is not ideal as a surface for a cylinder there is a bronze liner to be fitted that is 48mm OD and 44mm ID. Part 1-07.02
 
I thought that maybe the case...sorry i needy glasses!
It''s not a typo you need to look at the plans more closely.

As Julius often spec's his main parts from aluminium which is not ideal as a surface for a cylinder there is a bronze liner to be fitted that is 48mm OD and 44mm ID. Part 1-07.02
thought
 
PM Research makes a nice little beginner kit for 70 bucks, with engines #4 & #5 also available if you want a larger size as you mentioned. I enjoyed the build. You can buy a machined version of each if you wanted reference, the drawings are clear, and there are several youtube videos showing setups.

I've thought about powering an RC steam boat with it. Would make a fun project.

 
PM Research makes a nice little beginner kit for 70 bucks, with engines #4 & #5 also available if you want a larger size as you mentioned. I enjoyed the build. You can buy a machined version of each if you wanted reference, the drawings are clear, and there are several youtube videos showing setups.

I've thought about powering an RC steam boat with it. Would make a fun project.


Nice work! Well done!
 
I operate my steam engines on compressed air, for demonstration.

I have built and operated a boiler in the past, but that too was for demonstration, and it was not a certified boiler, and so not necessarily safe in the long run due to corrosion on the steel shell.

Building a boiler that produces a significant amount of power continuously is a rather complex affair if it is built with the required safety considerations.

There is not really a general agreement in the hobby community about what a "safe" boiler is, and that is a thorny topic to say the least.

I have photos of two certified fire-tube boilers, and in one case the individual purchased the raw finished metal parts from an online fab store and had a certified welder assemble it with a certification nameplate.

In another case, the individual purchased a complete certified boiler shell, and then added things like water level, gauges, etc.

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It all depends on what you want to do with the engine. If built reasonably well without tight spots but equally without sloppy fits then with no load most "steam" engines will happily tick over on a couple of psi or 0.1bar.

At the other end of the scale if you want the engine to do real work then you will need a higher pressure as energy in = energy out so may want to use 50psi or 3.5bar.

Size of compressor or boiler will be related to the speed you want to run the engine at, at tick over it will need very little volume. On the other hand if you want it fast to run a dynamo of a racing pond boat than the volume needed to run at 2000rpm will be a lot more.

Two videos of a similar design engine one showing how little is needed, the other at speed but still only a few psi





I would disagree with what PAT says about agreed safe boilers, there are many designs that pass regulations or have been built in accordance with local codes such as the Austrailian code. (AMBSE) and are therefore considered safe. You would do well to get a copy of this code as you are in Australia.
 
It all depends on what you want to do with the engine. If built reasonably well without tight spots but equally without sloppy fits then with no load most "steam" engines will happily tick over on a couple of psi or 0.1bar.

At the other end of the scale if you want the engine to do real work then you will need a higher pressure as energy in = energy out so may want to use 50psi or 3.5bar.

Size of compressor or boiler will be related to the speed you want to run the engine at, at tick over it will need very little volume. On the other hand if you want it fast to run a dynamo of a racing pond boat than the volume needed to run at 2000rpm will be a lot more.

Two videos of a similar design engine one showing how little is needed, the other at speed but still only a few psi





I would disagree with what PAT says about agreed safe boilers, there are many designs that pass regulations or have been built in accordance with local codes such as the Austrailian code. (AMBSE) and are therefore considered safe. You would do well to get a copy of this code as you are in Australia.

Thankyou! I just think, it's a steam engine....not a compressed air engine.....I would most likely only test run it on air, but ideally I would like to steam it. I'm getting material together and confirming some dimensions with Autocad at this stage.....
 
I have followed along with blondihacks from time to time, and she started building boilers.
I think she botched the boiler in this video.



I think she has gone on to successfully build copper boilers with high temperature silver solder.
More than one of her videos include in the title "Is it Safe ?".
That is the 100 dollar question.
I have seen some incredibly unsafe boiler builds online, and yes, they do make steam, but are timebombs.

If you know how to do high temperature silver soldering on boilers.
If you can find copper tubing that does not break the bank account.
If you use a safe boiler design to begin with.
If you use the right safety valve, water gauge, blowdown valve, etc. etc.
If you don't exceed a safe pressure.

I don't consider soft-soldered boilers safe under any condition, although all the toy boilers are made that way.
I had a Wilesco boiler joint blow out on me when I was a kid, and was almost blinded.

It can be done (a safe small boiler can be built).
I would not approach it in a casual way though, given the potential danger involved.

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