Newbie needs advice about a lathe

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terryd

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Terry, On the subject of the tool cutting point set 5 degeers above the centre of rotation of the workpiece:
Suppose a 3 to 4 degree clearance on a tool. It will rub at the contact tangent on the workpiece if 5 degrees high. But only start cutting if 5 degrees or more clearance angle.
Also the rake angle will cage per the 5 degree offset. So a zero angle rake on a tool becomes 5 degrees of rake, a tool selected withe 3 degrees positive rake will become 2 degrees negative rake, a 5 degree negative rake will become 10 degrees working rake, etc.
Sorry. It seems crazy to me.
Can anyone explain? IT's not just a language problem....
K2
Hi K2,

I think that it's just to take care of the 'spring' in the tool and workpiece - and no matter how 'rigid' e think that is there is always some slight movement in response to the forces involved, so if the tool is forced downwards it presents itself to the work as if it was on centre, at least that's all I can think of. Having said that as you say trial and error is important but so is a starting point especially for a tyro like John.

Best regards

TerryD
 
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It appears that in this multi-cultural forum we have started to bicker about "language" and pronunciation.
Surely, we should simply stick to the "Engineering and Machining issues"? - I am an old git who regularly cringes at some of the language used but recognise that mostly the message is truly transmitted - by all who use "English" as the common forum language. Even by those who do not have the fortune to have been raised and educated in "English, as she is spoke" - from 60 years ago - "like what I wus"...
Personally, I enjoy the language (and associated humour) - old and new - and have now fallen into the trap of discussing a distraction that I would prefer kept off this forum...
I'll just creep back into my little box and hide in my world of my prejudice...
K2
Wow, "English as she is spoke" an amazing book for those with a certain kind of warped sense of humor
 

Richard Hed

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Hi Richard,
no we don't use the term boondocks, we are though aquainted with it from US culture i.e films and songs especially. You mention the intermixing of languages, English itself is a mongrel language not only was it influenced by Celtic langages but by Latin, (Roman occupation and ecclesiastical use), Anglo Saxon (High German), Scandinavian (Danish, Norwegian and Swedish), Norman French and actual French (our so called imperial system of measures are actualy based of French or other European terms and only fully defined in theh middle of the 19th C. after the establishment of the more logical Metric system) as well as through our vast Empire accross the world.
Words you mention such as LASER (acronym for Light Amplified Stimulated - something - Radiation), snafu likewise (I'm too polite to explain that acronym), hypo is a Greek word (under) borrowed by the Romans hence hypocaust (underfloor heating) and Hypochlorite (fixing photographs etc) I think because it is an anion (negatively charged oxygen atom = minus or 'below') also hence hypochondria (below par in health terms) hypothermia (below normal temperature) etc so 'hypo' still has only one meaning it is the cocatenated terms which have different meanings. Byte is of course an abbreviation of binary digit and most other terms in computing are either derivations of normal words, abbreviations or acromyms and are used for specialised discussion (aka jargon) but some spill over into popular usage but all of these have developed in response to the needs of new technology,
I would still argue that a 'novice' of the Romans is still a 'novice' today so there is no need to 'make up' a new description when there is a perfectly good, quite well known, more elegant, less ugly existing word which has stood the test of time - I find that ridiculous just as changing the name of a, say, horse (Roman - Hippo, hippopotamus = River Horse, strange imagination those Romans) to say, piglettio o_O just because you can.
Glad you've enjoyed the discussion I also try not to take or give acrimony or insult anyone. You have to love language, it separates us from the rest of the animal kingdom - no let's not start another discussion that's just an observation. 😉

TerryD
Ah. Well, doesn't separate us from the animals as much as you might thimpfk. Animals, indeed, DO have language, we as humans just don't usually uinderstand them. They even have WRITTEN language. Some of the language they have is transmitted not by visible symbols but by odor symbols, such as dog and wolf peeing on fyrehydrants and territory marking. It is legitmate writing. Bears mark their territory by scratching trees--written language which conveys meaning to other bears or animals who understand.

Also an interesting fact you most likely will be interested in and marvel at like I myself do: most mamals (if not all) have a certain center in the brain that has a vocabulary size of about 500 words. Humans use this area for such things as exclaimations, and naughty words, and also important words such ad "mom", "dad", RUN, HELP. If learning a foreign language, the easiest words to learn are the naughty ones--have you ever noticed? These naughty words are stored in this special area. Regular language in human beans is stored in a different place that has evolved in human brains. Have no idea if other mamals have a primitive area. Sometimes a person might have an accident and knock out regular language area but not the primitive one. TV shows about that.
 

Richard Hed

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Hi K2,

I think that it's just to take care of the 'spring' in the tool and workpiece - and no matter how 'rigid' e think that is there is always some slight movement in response to the forces involved, so if the tool is forced downwards it presents itself to the work as if it was on centre, at least that's all I can think of. Having said that as you say trial and error is important but so is a starting point especially for a tyro like John.

Best regards

TerryD
I've known about these settings for the rocker style cutting tool for a while. I thimpfks that it may be that that particular angle has a relation to that rocker in which the rocker (when I actually used one on an SB I had) will snap out of place if held right at the center line. It happened to me a lot. If placed up a bit, it snaps out less often. I thimpfks it has to do with the angle of attack on the rocker arm.
 

Richard Hed

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Hi Richard,
no we don't use the term boondocks, we are though aquainted with it from US culture i.e films and songs especially. You mention the intermixing of languages, English itself is a mongrel language not only was it influenced by Celtic langages but by Latin, (Roman occupation and ecclesiastical use), Anglo Saxon (High German), Scandinavian (Danish, Norwegian and Swedish), Norman French and actual French (our so called imperial system of measures are actualy based of French or other European terms and only fully defined in theh middle of the 19th C. after the establishment of the more logical Metric system) as well as through our vast Empire accross the world.
Words you mention such as LASER (acronym for Light Amplified Stimulated - something - Radiation), snafu likewise (I'm too polite to explain that acronym), hypo is a Greek word (under) borrowed by the Romans hence hypocaust (underfloor heating) and Hypochlorite (fixing photographs etc) I think because it is an anion (negatively charged oxygen atom = minus or 'below') also hence hypochondria (below par in health terms) hypothermia (below normal temperature) etc so 'hypo' still has only one meaning it is the cocatenated terms which have different meanings. Byte is of course an abbreviation of binary digit and most other terms in computing are either derivations of normal words, abbreviations or acromyms and are used for specialised discussion (aka jargon) but some spill over into popular usage but all of these have developed in response to the needs of new technology,
I would still argue that a 'novice' of the Romans is still a 'novice' today so there is no need to 'make up' a new description when there is a perfectly good, quite well known, more elegant, less ugly existing word which has stood the test of time - I find that ridiculous just as changing the name of a, say, horse (Roman - Hippo, hippopotamus = River Horse, strange imagination those Romans) to say, piglettio o_O just because you can.
Glad you've enjoyed the discussion I also try not to take or give acrimony or insult anyone. You have to love language, it separates us from the rest of the animal kingdom - no let's not start another discussion that's just an observation. 😉

TerryD
The Philippino meaning of boondocks is "mountain". In the Philippines it does not have the reputation it has in the US. In the US it is equal to calling someone from the Ozarks, that is, inbred and ignorant. We also use "the boonies" which is derived from boondox but it simply means out from a far distance in the countryside, maybe difficult to find.
 

Jules

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Can people please stick to the topic of the thread and not go off on a tangent writing pages and pages about the English language.
It is hard to pick out replies about the actual subject.
Start a new topic if you want to discuss other subjects.
Rant over.
 

HMEL

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During Viet Nam era, a fresh recruit with no experience in the feild was called a newby for New Boy,. which sometimes was shortened to noob, also.
I know its off topic but had to respond. I had forgotten about those days and you are very correct. It may well be when and where it was first initiated.
 

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