Newbie needs advice about a lathe

Home Model Engine Machinist Forum

Help Support Home Model Engine Machinist Forum:

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
Can anyone explain why we use uneccessary construct 'Newbie' (or even uglier - Noobie) when there is a perfectly good, shorter to type, more elegant word - Tyro (m. Novice)- from the Latin, so in use for over 1000 years and in English for at least 500 and in use certainly in the USA ๐Ÿ˜‰๐Ÿ˜‰

Best regards

TerryD
 

ajoeiam

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2020
Messages
644
Reaction score
185
Location
blank (like some others I've noticed)
Can anyone explain why we use uneccessary construct 'Newbie' (or even uglier - Noobie) when there is a perfectly good, shorter to type, more elegant word - Tyro (m. Novice)- from the Latin, so in use for over 1000 years and in English for at least 500 and in use certainly in the USA ๐Ÿ˜‰๐Ÿ˜‰
Then why not use 'noob'?
 

Old Guy

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2021
Messages
64
Reaction score
13
Location
Manchester England
Can anyone explain why we use uneccessary construct 'Newbie' (or even uglier - Noobie) when there is a perfectly good, shorter to type, more elegant word - Tyro (m. Novice)- from the Latin, so in use for over 1000 years and in English for at least 500 and in use certainly in the USA ๐Ÿ˜‰๐Ÿ˜‰

Best regards

TerryD
Hi Terry
I think it may be because most of us and me imparticular might not be as well educated as yourself despite having a Grammar School education and having latin as a subject there I have never heard of the word
John
PS Or maybe I slept through that one
 
Last edited:

Old Guy

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2021
Messages
64
Reaction score
13
Location
Manchester England
Hi Terry
The Manual shows two centres supplied with the lathe an MT4 and a MT2 so you would expect the one supplied for the tailstock to be hardened, I'm going to get me file out if it is then I have managed to destroy a hardened one.
John
 

willray

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2014
Messages
156
Reaction score
67
Location
A hilltop in SE Ohio
Regarding a dead center in the tailstock,

Keep it lubricated through out the turning operation.

And generic "oil" is often sub-optimal. The classic solution is white lead paste, but this is not to the liking of those who are concerned that we lick our tooling, so one is stuck with other solutions.

You can find assorted high-pressure lubes intended/marketed for use on dead centers, or, "Anti Seize" compounds containing Molybdenum seem to work fairly well.

If you're a purist, tins of white lead paste do show up on eBay from time to time, or, you can make your own.

Will
 

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
Hi John,
It's bad practice to part off with the outer end supported like that. It is possible to cause all sorts of mash ups and can be dangerous if the work piches the parting off tool as it's nearing the end of the cut.. Parting from the front normally is not to bad as long as the work is rigid and tool not too far out from the chuck. If you must part off a long bar (I tend to go for a hacksaw even up to 50mm dia and occasionally more.) One way of doing that job thogh is to set up a fixed steady that the bar can run in and part of on the tailstock side of the steady. If you don't have one of those, they are quie easy to make up from welded square tube and there are quite a few ideas on YouTube etc. Of course the lathe supplier will sell you a purpose made one.

For parting off the best solution is an upside down tool mounted in a holder on the rear of the saddle and with the lathe running normally. with the front toolpost the main problem with parting is the tendency for the tool to 'submarine' below the work as the diameter gets smaller. The geometry of the process done from the rear avoids that problem. I'm in the process of making a rear mounted toolpost at the moment based on the example by G.H. Thomas (the Master - his book' The Model Engineers Workshop Manual' is just brilliant as is his 'Workshop Techniques'). To quote one of the sellers:
"The third book by this highly respected author will undoubtedly become the bible for both novice and experienced alike,....."

1663428098449.png
The above was made from castings but mine is from solid bar stock, I'll send a picture when done.

Here's a video making a fixed steady using only a lathe. The guy is using a hot rolled blank and I got similar from a local engineering company about 4-5" diameter which would do the job. The base of course would be made to suit your own lathe, the 'legs' I would make from short lengths of hot rolled square tube. also have a look at the YouTube video by 'Enots Engineering' on a similar subject.

Regards

TerryD

Terry
 

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
Regarding a dead center in the tailstock,



And generic "oil" is often sub-optimal. The classic solution is white lead paste, but this is not to the liking of those who are concerned that we lick our tooling, so one is stuck with other solutions.

You can find assorted high-pressure lubes intended/marketed for use on dead centers, or, "Anti Seize" compounds containing Molybdenum seem to work fairly well.

If you're a purist, tins of white lead paste do show up on eBay from time to time, or, you can make your own.

Will
Hi Will,
When I started my apprenticeship we used tallow, solid fat but low melting point and excellent lubrication, but horrible stink๐Ÿ˜–
In fact as the stink got worse it was an indication of overheating๐Ÿ˜ค and time to stop.

TerryD
 

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
Hi John,

Here's one of the blanks suitable for a fixed steady I got from my local engineering company this one is about 190mm dia. as you can see. As one of my reverse jaws for my 3 jaw chuck was lost in a workshop fire I'll have to bore out in a 4 jaw chuck to the required diameter and then complete the job by hloding it with the outside of the standard 3 jaws using the bore as reference then face and reduce the external diameter, or i might just drive the 7 miles too the enginering company and see if they have any smaller blanks as they did before. ๐Ÿ˜‰

1663432057482.png

Here's my Unrestored) fixed steady along with my (restored) travelling steady you can see that the fixed steady (3 fingers) is only about 80 mm inside and it's done me well in the past:

1663432103312.png

I had a garage fire some time ago which destroyed much but quite a bit of the 'kit' was not irreparably damaged and I'm in the (slow) process of refurbishing the recovered items.

Regards

TerryD
 

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
Then why not use 'noob'?
So ugly and inelegant, like many US made up words like 'pled' instead of pleaded, 'dove' instead of dived,' snuck' instead of sneaked etc Ugh. if you fixed a faucet that leaks I think you'd say "it leaked" not "it luck". There are perfectly good words used for many many years in English derived from classical languages that have stood the test of time without making up new ones, perhaps it's just a lack of erudition?

Terry
 

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
Hi Terry
The Manual shows two centres supplied with the lathe an MT4 and a MT2 so you would expect the one supplied for the tailstock to be hardened, I'm going to get me file out if it is then I have managed to destroy a hardened one.
John
You're probably right John, My centres are all 2MT and I use a 2 to 4MT adapter to mount ones in the spindle

Regards

TerryD
 

ajoeiam

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2020
Messages
644
Reaction score
185
Location
blank (like some others I've noticed)
So ugly and inelegant, like many US made up words like 'pled' instead of pleaded, 'dove' instead of dived,' snuck' instead of sneaked etc Ugh. if you fixed a faucet that leaks I think you'd say "it leaked" not "it luck". There are perfectly good words used for many many years in English derived from classical languages that have stood the test of time without making up new ones, perhaps it's just a lack of erudition?

Terry
Likely its more a certain laziness and also a lack of vocabulary.
I find that words like tyro are useful except the majority of people don't know what the sam snot it means.
Seems like everyone knows what a noob or a noobie is - - - and as I do like to be understood instead of wanting to stay in the shadows - - - oh well - - - (LOL) I be a noob in far too many areas (including being a people - - grin!).
 
Joined
Apr 2, 2020
Messages
2,678
Reaction score
810
Location
Sunderland , UK.
Hi Craig
That's a bit of a bummer then I was thinking that if I bought a set from a good supplier like Chronos they would be good to go but it would seem not and those grooves to me look they make the cutting angle too great but what do I know it's back to you tube and see what the guys that have site are doing I think

John
Hi John. I have bought tools and used them out of the packet and thought they were OK. But soon learned that close attention to "sharp" was worth the effort.
Sometimes I think it crazy that I spend more time setting tools than cutting swarf... but the whole job is dependant on the right setting, and I have had to rectify jobs when I didn't do enough time and effort being sure the setting was correct. So I'll let you learn from my mistakes, and advise you make the setting, then "check, check, check", "to be sure to be sure" your setting is good before machining your parts. Worth every minute of setting care.
K2
 

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
Hi Terry
I think it may be because most of us and me imparticular might not be as well educated as yourself despite having a Grammar School education and having latin as a subject there I have never heard of the word
John
PS Or maybe I slept through that one
Hi John,
The Latin spelling is tiro and refers, in Roman times, to a novice soldier. by the way I sent you a message, I need an email address for you send it via converrsations for privacy

TerryD
 

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
Hi John. I have bought tools and used them out of the packet and thought they were OK. But soon learned that close attention to "sharp" was worth the effort.
Sometimes I think it crazy that I spend more time setting tools than cutting swarf... but the whole job is dependant on the right setting, and I have had to rectify jobs when I didn't do enough time and effort being sure the setting was correct. So I'll let you learn from my mistakes, and advise you make the setting, then "check, check, check", "to be sure to be sure" your setting is good before machining your parts. Worth every minute of setting care.
K2
Hi K2,

This is from the Southbend 1934 manual, The cutter should be positioned on a line 5ยฐ from and above the centre of the workpiece, it's also the recommendation of Boxford:

1663496262545.png
Regards

TerryD
 

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
Likely its more a certain laziness and also a lack of vocabulary.
I find that words like tyro are useful except the majority of people don't know what the sam snot it means.
Seems like everyone knows what a noob or a noobie is - - - and as I do like to be understood instead of wanting to stay in the shadows - - - oh well - - - (LOL) I be a noob in far too many areas (including being a people - - grin!).
Yes, I must admit that tyro is not widely used but that's because it's not widely used, especially by lazy folk. But 'noob' does sound like something emanating from someone's nasal cavity.
I find it interesting that 'newbie' bcame 'noobie', then 'noob', so logically it next becomes 'noo', then 'no', then 'n' ๐Ÿ˜‰
Regards

TerrD
 
Last edited:

ajoeiam

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2020
Messages
644
Reaction score
185
Location
blank (like some others I've noticed)
Yes, I must admit that tyro is not widely used but that's because it's not widely used, especially by lazy folk. But 'noob' does sound like something emanating from someone's nasal cavity.
I find it interesting that 'newbie' bcame 'noobie', then 'noob', so logically it next becomes 'noo', then 'no', then 'n' ๐Ÿ˜‰
Regards

TerrD
I will be understanding 'noob' any time I see a floating 'n' in any of your further missives - - - lol.

(But - - - but but but - - - do you expect to use no other 'n' words?)
 

terryd

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 15, 2010
Messages
356
Reaction score
188
Location
South Leicestershire, England
I will be understanding 'noob' any time I see a floating 'n' in any of your further missives - - - lol.

(But - - - but but but - - - do you expect to use no other 'n' words?)
As a liberal white British European I have never used the 'n' word you are implying in your typical comment. And I will never reference the ugly, snotty term you prefer to be identified by. An example of nominative determinism if ever I saw one. I prefer to use real words not made up ones by those who's poor erudition leaves a lot to be desired, that sort of problem is what got Humpy Dumpty into trouble.

By the way there are treatments to help people who stammer.

Best regards

TerryD
 
Last edited:

Old Guy

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2021
Messages
64
Reaction score
13
Location
Manchester England
Hi John,

Here's one of the blanks suitable for a fixed steady I got from my local engineering company this one is about 190mm dia. as you can see. As one of my reverse jaws for my 3 jaw chuck was lost in a workshop fire I'll have to bore out in a 4 jaw chuck to the required diameter and then complete the job by hloding it with the outside of the standard 3 jaws using the bore as reference then face and reduce the external diameter, or i might just drive the 7 miles too the enginering company and see if they have any smaller blanks as they did before. ๐Ÿ˜‰

View attachment 140045

Here's my Unrestored) fixed steady along with my (restored) travelling steady you can see that the fixed steady (3 fingers) is only about 80 mm inside and it's done me well in the past:

View attachment 140046

I had a garage fire some time ago which destroyed much but quite a bit of the 'kit' was not irreparably damaged and I'm in the (slow) process of refurbishing the recovered items.

Regards

TerryD
Hi Terry

Seems I may not have described what i did very well because I supported the far end of the bar with a fixed steady and then parted off a small disc on the tailstock side or maybe its not good practice to do that anyway

John
 

RM-MN

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2017
Messages
189
Reaction score
71
Hi Terry

Seems I may not have described what i did very well because I supported the far end of the bar with a fixed steady and then parted off a small disc on the tailstock side or maybe its not good practice to do that anyway

John
Sometimes you need support at the tailstock end as you start parting off but beware of completing the part-off with the end still supported as it can jam and cause things to go wrong. I might start parting but stop when I have only a small bit left and remove the support while I finish the parting with a hacksaw.
 

ajoeiam

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2020
Messages
644
Reaction score
185
Location
blank (like some others I've noticed)
As a liberal white British European I have never used the 'n' word you are implying in your typical comment. And I will never reference the ugly, snotty term you prefer to be identified by. An example of nominative determinism if ever I saw one. I prefer to use real words not made up ones by those who's poor erudition leaves a lot to be desired, that sort of problem is what got Humpy Dumpty into trouble.

By the way there are treatments to help people who stammer.

Best regards

TerryD
You went a whole pile of parsecs further in your inference than I had thought possible.

I was thinking of words like north or never or . . . .
it would seem that your circle of acquaintances is sorta small - - - if you ever have occasion to hang out with the computer types you would find many many other terms entering your vocabulary.
Now if you hang out with the military types you could add some more - - - mostly as abbreviations - - - such institution seems to delight in modifying individuals until they are happy with their conformity to their group.

I take it you have never hear anyone ever sputter either.
 

Latest posts

Top