Quantcast

Corliss Steam Engine (Coles Power Models)

Help Support HMEM:

plipoma

Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2013
Messages
23
Reaction score
8
There still seem to be questions about the availability of Coles Corliss drawings and castings. As I posted earlier, for those interested, the 1978-79 R. Bromps drawings and some castings are available from Jeffrey Lehn, Ph. 724 931 0580.
 

bigal2749

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
Messages
60
Reaction score
4
Machining done that nice and crisp makes it a work of art. Al
 

lathe nut

Lathe Nut
HMEM Supporter
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
587
Reaction score
60
What a beautiful Engine, I was wonder do you really do all that work or the one on your shoulder does it and you taking the credit, I think I know the answer, you going to have some serious hours of machining in that engine, looking forward to see it running, the one we had was rope driven to the pump, that was a neat way they did it to switch it back to the other side of the drive pulley, when I was running it one night it started pounding I went around the side of the engine where the valves were and it was a worn catch block that would lift the cam about half way and drop it, so I took my hand and held the came to the catch block was and it got silent, well that was good but a young kid and had never change on with the engine running I helped it drop for about two hours before the older man come to relieve me, he was calm said stay here I will get the block, I was well aware of how to keep it opening while he changed it, the next time It pounded but I change it quick as i could, I have wanted to build one but the hours, this winter I am going to make the pulleys to show how the rope was crossed over, some people have asked me over the years where you get a V-Belt that long I tell them it was a rope and get a blank stare, I say to them when you figure that out let me know, no answer yet, again thanks for sharing your wisdom, Joe
 

Richard Hed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2018
Messages
842
Reaction score
186
Location
Seattle
What a beautiful Engine, I was wonder do you really do all that work or the one on your shoulder does it and you taking the credit, I think I know the answer, you going to have some serious hours of machining in that engine, looking forward to see it running, the one we had was rope driven to the pump, that was a neat way they did it to switch it back to the other side of the drive pulley, when I was running it one night it started pounding I went around the side of the engine where the valves were and it was a worn catch block that would lift the cam about half way and drop it, so I took my hand and held the came to the catch block was and it got silent, well that was good but a young kid and had never change on with the engine running I helped it drop for about two hours before the older man come to relieve me, he was calm said stay here I will get the block, I was well aware of how to keep it opening while he changed it, the next time It pounded but I change it quick as i could, I have wanted to build one but the hours, this winter I am going to make the pulleys to show how the rope was crossed over, some people have asked me over the years where you get a V-Belt that long I tell them it was a rope and get a blank stare, I say to them when you figure that out let me know, no answer yet, again thanks for sharing your wisdom, Joe
IN Cebu City (Philippines) I can get any type of belts done for a few bucks. Custom made. It is quite simple really, I'm sure if someone wanted to, they could make simple belts of some type of rope/fibre and some type of curable rubber with a form of some type and do what is necessary. I have been thimking about how I am going to do the belts for the Corliss/Ray. Maybe I will put some effort into making some of these belts.
 

lathe nut

Lathe Nut
HMEM Supporter
Joined
Dec 15, 2007
Messages
587
Reaction score
60
I don't think you understand what I was talking about, let me try again, it was one continuous rope, try to understand it was not V-Belt groves, it was round groves in the flywheel and the pump pulley (like you would make with a round over tool) flywheel 30' in diameter and the pump pulley 8' and 60' from center of each shaft, think they make a V-Belt that size and for a few bucks.
 

Richard Hed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2018
Messages
842
Reaction score
186
Location
Seattle
I don't think you understand what I was talking about, let me try again, it was one continuous rope, try to understand it was not V-Belt groves, it was round groves in the flywheel and the pump pulley (like you would make with a round over tool) flywheel 30' in diameter and the pump pulley 8' and 60' from center of each shaft, think they make a V-Belt that size and for a few bucks.
You are right I didn't understand. I have seen where there are rope pulleys where there are several ropes on the pulleys acting as a single belt (several ropes= one belt , sorta). What I'm thimking is very much the same thing in miniature but not rope shaped grooves, rather one set of fibres set with some tiype of goo like rubber that can be baked or cured some way.

In this forum there are lots of guys having to figure out things like they did 100 years ago, like my dad and his friends did, and occassionally a few people in the modern ages can go, I like this. One thing is that in the third world people still do those sorts of things. I am amazed at what people can do in the philippines, even when one generally thimks of Philippino people as quite backwards--the ones with ambition do amazing things. I see some Indian (from India) utube vids where they do amazing things too. In the "West" we are so rich, we forget sometimes, how to thimk.
 

ZAPJACK

Member
Project of the Month Winner
Joined
Nov 1, 2010
Messages
261
Reaction score
552
Location
Namur (Belgium)
There are three different cast iron plates to adapt to the cylinder block.
See the difference between "before" and "after"
Machining the 4 valves holes is really a stressful job
LeZap

DSC_0504.jpg
DSC_0485.jpg
DSC_0506.jpg
DSC_0507.jpg
DSC_0511.jpg
DSC_0512.jpg
DSC_0514.jpg
 

Richard Hed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2018
Messages
842
Reaction score
186
Location
Seattle
There are three different cast iron plates to adapt to the cylinder block.
See the difference between "before" and "after"
Machining the 4 valves holes is really a stressful job
LeZap

View attachment 116990View attachment 116991View attachment 116992View attachment 116993View attachment 116994View attachment 116995View attachment 116996
Can I ask why this is so stressful? I did this about 40 years ago and I can't remember being stressed by it. You have goo tools and looks to me like a very goo job. I thimk basically all you really have to worry about is making sure the cutter is exactly center lined up with the meeting of the plate and body. You could be a few thou left or right but not the meeting line.
 

ZAPJACK

Member
Project of the Month Winner
Joined
Nov 1, 2010
Messages
261
Reaction score
552
Location
Namur (Belgium)
The fine tread are also something complicate to do. There is a lot of.
But the biggest difficulty is to stop just before the end of part.
The cutting tool come very close.
LeZap
DSC_0540.jpg
DSC_0541.jpg
DSC_0542.jpg
DSC_0544.jpg
DSC_0545.jpg
DSC_0546.jpg
 

Richard Hed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2018
Messages
842
Reaction score
186
Location
Seattle
The fine tread are also something complicate to do. There is a lot of.
But the biggest difficulty is to stop just before the end of part.
The cutting tool come very close.
LeZap
View attachment 117101View attachment 117102View attachment 117103View attachment 117104View attachment 117105View attachment 117106
Yes, u r correct. I didn't bother with doing those fine threads I did it a different way, with little screws. But NOW I have ahand wheel which makes that kind of operation much easier
 

kvom

Well-Known Member
Staff member
Joined
Jun 4, 2008
Messages
3,208
Reaction score
602
The sandwich cylinder block is quite interesting. On my current project, the Greene cutoff engine, the block is a single casting. I had a blowout on the top, and before deciding to repair it I investigated making the block from 3 pieces of cast iron to replicate the internal cores. Since I had a Solidworks model of the cylinder, I could slice it quite precisely.

I eventually decided to mill out the damaged area and install a patch.
 

Steamchick

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2020
Messages
744
Reaction score
256
Location
Sunderland , UK
LeZap: Lovely work - keep up the good work and excellent reports. Especially the work making stepped piston rings. I just wonder if in truth they are worth the effort of making? - Or is that the stupid question is because this is like climbing mountains. Don't ask "why" - the pleasure is both in "the Doing" and "Achieving the result".
Raised on Commercial industry - I look for the best engineering solution - which considers everything - including cost, materials, serviceability, "manufacturing efficiency", and a host of other things - including stress of the people making it! They do appear to have a large overlap. Not something I have designed, so what are the criteria for the design of the overlap? - I have only designed rings for cylinder wall pressure, size and with straight gaps. (Decades ago!).
K2
 

Richard Hed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2018
Messages
842
Reaction score
186
Location
Seattle
LeZap: Lovely work - keep up the good work and excellent reports. Especially the work making stepped piston rings. I just wonder if in truth they are worth the effort of making? - Or is that the stupid question is because this is like climbing mountains. Don't ask "why" - the pleasure is both in "the Doing" and "Achieving the result".
Raised on Commercial industry - I look for the best engineering solution - which considers everything - including cost, materials, serviceability, "manufacturing efficiency", and a host of other things - including stress of the people making it! They do appear to have a large overlap. Not something I have designed, so what are the criteria for the design of the overlap? - I have only designed rings for cylinder wall pressure, size and with straight gaps. (Decades ago!).
K2
There is also the genuiness of parts to consider. As for myself, I just buy suitable commercial rings. But I applaud the efforts of those who wish to make their own.
 

Steamchick

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2020
Messages
744
Reaction score
256
Location
Sunderland , UK
I remember stepped rings when re-furbishing IC engines and large piston air compressors in the 1960s, but since the 19770s I have only experienced straight cut rings - although I did re-design some air motors that already had PTFE rings, some cut at 45 degrees. Nobody could explain "why" - but it seemed to be someone's "Whim" to reduce blow-by - although calculations showed that to be so insignificant as to be - well, insignificant! I can see that at each "corner" there is a pressure drop - where the turbulent constriction factor restricts the flow by 80~90 % at each corner, so 2 corners permits ~72% of "flow" but 4 corners permits ~ 52% of flow... so the improvement is to permit 5/7ths of blow-by of a straight cut.... Maybe on a small I.C. model (e.g. 1cc) with so little volume this makes a significant drop of actual compression versus calculated displacement compression? - But on "real" engines (35cc and up to hundreds of litres) this becomes insignificant? Also, on Steam plant - such as the Corliss engine here - the steam blow-by assists "end-of-stroke" damping - and is also restricted a bit by condensation from expansion through the ring gap, etc. thus making any improvement from the stepped ring (due to steam loss) as virtually immeasurable. But a brilliant job by LeZap to make the stepped rings! Where the average man goes, there will always be a perfectionist in front setting a new limit. You are well in front of me!
K2
 

ZAPJACK

Member
Project of the Month Winner
Joined
Nov 1, 2010
Messages
261
Reaction score
552
Location
Namur (Belgium)
Thanks for your considération.
I try to be close possible to the spirit of the creator of this Corliss. (1946)
Of course, it's much more easier to order rings by Amazon of other. But I don't look for easy way
LeZap
 

Steamchick

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2020
Messages
744
Reaction score
256
Location
Sunderland , UK
On ropes... One bit of ancient technology (Yes, I mean ancient - as in pre-Egyptian!) that ropes are good for: The splice. I learned splicing ropes with the Grey Funnel Fleet.... and love to splice and end ropes properly now. The Coxswain ("Coxun" to some who can't spell English words) taught us Midshipmen - and then showed us what 4 hours could do when he spliced a 2inch steel-wire rope eye that was used on the Hawser for a towing exercise. Dozens of high tensile steel wires to interweave. Actually, not a great load used towing a ship. 1 Man could "Walk" the boat along the wharf (I did one night) about 200 feet to the next berth so the ferry could arrive the following morning. Slow, but secured all the way and just a lot of slackening and tightening ropes in a sequence. And everyone slept while I did it!
Back to ropes: The masts of Sailing ships (proper big multi-masted Ocean racing beauties!) were actually 2, 3 or 4 masts: tied to each other one atop another. All held with ropes. Not nuts and bolts! Have a look at the masts next time you see a tall ship.
The Spinning Jennies and looms in all the Cotton and Wool Manufactories of the North of England industrial revolution - powered by large water wheels - were driven from "engine floor" - where the water wheel and sluices were - up to the floors above by rope loops over pulleys. The loops were (and are in museums today) joined by splicing.
It's just like platting a girl's hair (bet you can't remember doing that as a little lad!) - but platting one girl's hair into the plat of another girl's hair is splicing! And they scream at you when they can't undo it and you run off! The only exception is "splicing the main-brace". That's the best splice of all...
K2
 

Latest posts

Top