Can anyone help identify these various pieces?

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laurag

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Hello. I posted a few days ago about trying to identify some pieces for my fathers lathe so I have an idea what I am looking at in order to sell as part of his estate. I am attaching couple of photos - he had a nice board made up that holds the majority of the items- I just don’t know anything about this unfortunately. Any help on identifying any of these is greatly appreciated. Also if anyone has any idea on pricing that would be appreciated as well. Thanks in advance.
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Gordon

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Top row: Change gears for thread cutting. Left: Lathe dogs. Center: Steady rest (home made) Nest right: Face plate and three jaw chuck. Bottom shelf: Tailstock drill chuck, ball bearing center. Various tool bit holders. Square piece is quick change tool holder, possibly home made. Box: tool bits. The two long drill bits are not really part of the lathe. The two chisel with wood handle are for wood cutting, not part of a metal lathe.

Not at all sure of how much it is worth. Depending on location and condition, somewhere between $750-$1000. Wild guess.
 

trlvn

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The lathe was sold by Sears under their Craftsman label but the machine was made by the Atlas Press company. Likely from the 1940s or 1950s. Appears to be in good condition and I suspect you'll have no trouble selling it. These machines are small enough that a hobby machinist can move them pretty easily and yet robust enough to do a good range of work. The "size" of a lathe is the combination of the maximum diameter of a piece that can be turned (12" in your case) and the maximum length between the headstock and tailstock (possibly 30 or 36 inches?).

There are numerous example of similar machines on the VintageMachinery web site; here is one at random:


As to price, I'm not in the USA so I can't give a good estimate. I will say that prices have escalated rapidly over the last couple of years. Lots of people seem to be looking for home-based hobbies during the pandemic and they've driven up the prices of serviceable older machines. Since you've got large and small 3-jaw chucks plus a 4-jaw, and a good range of other tooling, that increases the value of the package. Some searches on Craigslist, etc, might find some comparable listings in your vicinity.

Craig
 

laurag

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Top row: Change gears for thread cutting. Left: Lathe dogs. Center: Steady rest (home made) Nest right: Face plate and three jaw chuck. Bottom shelf: Tailstock drill chuck, ball bearing center. Various tool bit holders. Square piece is quick change tool holder, possibly home made. Box: tool bits. The two long drill bits are not really part of the lathe. The two chisel with wood handle are for wood cutting, not part of a metal lathe.

Not at all sure of how much it is worth. Depending on location and condition, somewhere between $750-$1000. Wild guess.

Thanks for the assist.
 

laurag

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The lathe was sold by Sears under their Craftsman label but the machine was made by the Atlas Press company. Likely from the 1940s or 1950s. Appears to be in good condition and I suspect you'll have no trouble selling it. These machines are small enough that a hobby machinist can move them pretty easily and yet robust enough to do a good range of work. The "size" of a lathe is the combination of the maximum diameter of a piece that can be turned (12" in your case) and the maximum length between the headstock and tailstock (possibly 30 or 36 inches?).

There are numerous example of similar machines on the VintageMachinery web site; here is one at random:


As to price, I'm not in the USA so I can't give a good estimate. I will say that prices have escalated rapidly over the last couple of years. Lots of people seem to be looking for home-based hobbies during the pandemic and they've driven up the prices of serviceable older machines. Since you've got large and small 3-jaw chucks plus a 4-jaw, and a good range of other tooling, that increases the value of the package. Some searches on Craigslist, etc, might find some comparable listings in your vicinity.

Craig
Thank you very much. I will do some more digging now that I have this info.
 

Gedeon Spilett

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very nice set of tooling...a good opportunity to start a hobby !
the two chisels with wooden handle might be for metal turning too...
turning brass or bronze with hand tool is a delight, but nowadays too expensive according to the price of a good length of a bronze bar to make a candlestick...
 

Mechanicboy

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the two chisels with wooden handle might be for metal turning too...
turning brass or bronze with hand tool is a delight, but nowadays too expensive according to the price of a good length of a bronze bar to make a candlestick...

Laurag..

 
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you can find the manuals and details on that lathe on the vintage machinery site. Atlas is collectible and so it has more value than an equivalent lathe of a more obscure brand. if you get the details on the lathe you have you will get more money for it. if you want to just get it out of the way fast, price it at 10% of what you see them selling for and choose a buyer you like.
 
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