Arduino RPM Application for Sieg Lathes and Mills

Discussion in 'Software and Programming' started by Jennifer Edwards, Nov 27, 2018.

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  1. Feb 22, 2019 #21

    Captain_Obvious

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    Yup, that's the one.
     
  2. Feb 23, 2019 #22

    rodw

    rodw

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    Very cool but sadly I can't play as my SX3 mill comes with a tacho readout...
     
  3. Mar 23, 2019 #23

    Jennifer Edwards

    Jennifer Edwards

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    I have had quite a few requests for my code lately so I thought I would attach a copy to this post. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions of comments.
     

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  4. Jun 8, 2019 #24

    Motorman1946

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    Having just come across this thread read it with interest as I had a similar problem. With a lathe driven by a 3ph motor controlled by a VFD fitted with a variable resistor giving outputs set from 10 to 70 Hz available at a twiddle of the fingers and a belt variator incorporated within the belt drive I hadn't a clue what speed the chuck was whizzing around at. I didn't have the ability on my lathe to do what Jenny had done, if I had the Jenny's solution would have been magic, but fortunately another forum pointed me in a different direction.

    From Hong Kong via E-Bay I purchased a 4 digit display mounted on a controlling pcb and supplied with proximity sensor and magnet for about £6.50. Delivered. Where was the profit in that I thought. Then I went to Maplins (we had one then) and bought a cheap plastic enclosure for about £4. I made up an attachment to fit in the end non-working end of the headstock that is secured by a simple expansion arrangement (so it can be very easily removed it it is ever necessary to mount something in the chuck that fits all the way back through the headstock) and Araldited the magnet to that, mounted the sensor to suit and wired it into the pcb together with a 12v dc supply and away I went. The tricky bit was finding out what wire went where, as there were no instructions!

    So, 2 pics below to show read-out and sensor mounted on the end of the headstock.

    Hope you don't mind me taking your thread on a little detour Jenny.

    Chris

    IMGA0679.JPG fullsizeoutput_d8e.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  5. Jun 8, 2019 #25

    Jennifer Edwards

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    Great job Chris,

    Not only do I not mind, I am happy that this post piqued enough interest to get others to think of their own solutions.

    It amazes me how inexpensive electronics from the Far East are. It opens up a whole world of experimentation on a shoestring budget.

    I also thought about a pickup/magnet solution but having been a software engineer, and having stumbled over someone else’s work where he had decoded the signal from the controller, I decided to just use the data available from the controller board on my machine.

    Now that you bought up how inexpensive the display and other components are, it makes me wonder just how Axminster can justify charging £150.00 their display?

    Well done Chris, a nice solution.
     
  6. Jun 8, 2019 #26

    Motorman1946

    Motorman1946

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    Thanks for your kind words Jenny. Am impressed with your software capability and knowledge, to me it's a black art; as a mechanical guy I am also always suspicious of anything with wires coming out of it!

    Yes, electronic stuff from the Far East does seem very inexpensive, how they do it for the price inc. delivery I don't know, but happy to avail myself when I need to, so the high prices some UK supplies charge for stuff is upsetting and seems unjustified. £150 for the equivalent of what you did does seem just a tad over the top!

    We live about an easy half hours drive from Axminister and about 10 years ago I was always eager to visit the Axminister store there. Not anymore, now I only go if I desperately need something I can't get elsewhere. Then they had a good stock of metal mangling tools and equipment, now very little, they seem to be more interested in folk that play with that brown stuff rather than metal. Pity really. Their service and delivery are as always first class, but they seem to have very limited stock of engineering stuff and have seem to have gone 'up-market' engineering-wise, which is code for the same stuff at much higher prices. Sadly, despite Axminster being on the doorstep I use ArcEutoTrade for most stuff these days; they, I find, are more reasonably priced and their service and delivery is also excellent plus they cater for a wide range of workshop engineering needs.

    Chris
     
  7. Jun 8, 2019 #27

    Jennifer Edwards

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    Yes I agee with your view of Axminster, but i am guilty of having bought one of their 500 watt 7x12 lathes, and an SX2 vertical milling machine from them. I think I liked the colour scheme better ;-)

    lately I have purchased much of my tooling, and accesories from Arceurotrade. They are much more reasonable. i thimk I picked up my ER32 collet set from them for about 1/2 price as well.

    However I have found making one more jump "ustream" in the supply chain and purchasing directly from the makers saves me even more. If I see something I like at ARC or AXM and the brand name is visible, I simply search for the makers company on-line and buy direct. Great customer circus is worth a lot from a supplier, but not a 100% markup.

    For example I purchased my replacable carbide insert tooling direct from Glanze at less than half the price AXM asks and 1/3 less than ARC. I use their mutiple insert fly cutters, and lathe tools. i have also found great end mills both carbide and steel from others at much better prices as well.

    OK thats enough off topic blather for now...
     

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