MB building Upshur Farm Engines.

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hopeless

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Thanks for the reply MB. I was pondering what to do for an oiler for a bigger version hit & miss that seems to always get put on hold and you come up with the ideal way ;D gaining good ideas to help simplify the larger 1 as well tho thats a casting engine.
Cheers
Pete
 

bearcar1

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MB. You just go right on posting up pictures to your hearts content, they are clear, concise graphic representations of the steps that some of us may or may not have seen or done before. Yeah baby. Those Upshurs are coming along nicely. Can't wait to see them.

regards

BC1
Jim
 

1hand

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you aways have that power feed on your Mill? That looks pretty nice!

Engine Parts looking good too.
 

Deanofid

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Metal Butcher said:
#196 I threw in a picture of my messy M/D. I don't want any one to think that I'm fussy about neatness. :eek:
Oh yes.. That's very funny, Rick! ;D :D
Always good to check in on your threads. I can count on being greeted with great progress, and sometimes even a humorous quip.

Dean
 

Metal Butcher

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Hi guys!

Carl, Pete, Jim, Thanks for taking interest in my project. :)

Matt, I got the power feed for my M/D about 4 years ago. I found out very quickly that hand cranking the table would not work with my back problem. I got mine from Harbor Freight (The power feed, not the bad back), and I think its the same one that CDCO and a few others carry. It needs to be specifically for a Mill/Drill.

Dean, I knew you would enjoy the extra pictures and comment. ;D ;)

-MB
 

Metal Butcher

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#207 I finished up drilling and tapping the plates for the two vertical versions. I assembled the plates with 4-40 screws and all the pieces fit together well. The only coment I'd like to make is that a #35 drill specified for the thru holes is way too tight, and the screws need to be threaded in before they reach the threaded holes in the mating plates. Adding profiles to all the side plates is next.



#208 The profile being cut in the picture below is the only one specified in the plans for the horizontal engines. Based on the dimension I used a bevel protractor and determined the profile angle to be between 43-1/2 and 44-1/2 degrees. A little odd, so I went with 45 degrees. I already have a shop made thin 45-d V-block made for my vise. Close enough as far as I'm concerned. In the picture the excess was cut away with the band saw, and touched up with the belt sander. I left only .020" to be milled off. On the front plate you can see the scribed line. I could have easily removed more with the belt sander and finished up with a file. It would have been faster to void a mill set-up, if I were only doing two side plates for a single build.



#209 I attached the thin V-block to the fixed jaw of the vise with double stick (sided) scotch tape. After clamping the work piece in the vise, a vise stop was slid into place and locked down for added support.



#210 I carefully adjusted the height of the cutter several times on the first piece to get it just right. The rest were cut with one pass. In the picture below you can see the roughly scribed lines I use habitually to avoid gross errors, in this case they were unnecessary.
Chop, chop, in the butcher shop! :big:



#211 Here's where I deviate from the plan and add an additional profile. Before ordering the plan set I noticed the radius above the cylinder on the front plate was a bit tall and odd looking. The front plate is 1.500" wide with an indicated radius of .937". To rectify this eye catching situation the radius needed to be reduced. A .750" radius would be the way to go, but this would require the side plates to be milled down to the threaded gear mounting hole. A compromise was in order to reduce the radius on the front plate, and the height of the side plates to make them both look a bit more appealing. The final decision was to use a .780" radius, and to reduce the height of the side plates by .280". The reduction in the side plates also allowed for the same angle to be used in front of the crank shaft bearing points, adding a more symmetrical look to the side plates.

The lay out was simple. A tight fitting pin was used to line up two plates, with the top plate flipped over the angled line was scribed on one plate to set the cutter at the proper height.



#212 I used the top of the plate at the bearing point to zero out the mill quill and lower the cutter to the proper height. On the first plate I moved the cutter towards the milled angle till the intersection was just right. Using one cut along the Y axis all of the plates were cut in identically. After they were all cut up to the angle with one pass, the plates were returned to the mill to finish up with the rest that wasn't removed with the critical first cut.



#213 The plates for the vertical (V-1) have a simple 30 degree profile cut on both sides. I had to use shim stock to get a grip on the work, since the angle plate was thicker than the work piece.

Its always something causing a problem! :wall:



#214 The side plates for the vertical (V-2) version just begged for an alteration. I made the plates the same width as the length of the base plate. The next step was to reduce the upper part of both plates to the original width.

Your probably thinking, "This is one crazy machinist, first he makes it big, then he cuts it up and makes it small!" Rof}



#215 This is where things got interesting. It was getting late and I was starting to feel a little 'punch drunk'. I was scribing lines all over the place and getting seriously confused! I should have quit while I was ahead, but no the "I feel lucky" attitude took over. I forged ahead by milling the 30 degree angles first.



#216 The upper angles went well. The next steps were to cut the lower 30-d angles. After cutting the first one I went to flip over the work and reality set in! I had milled away what little support the lower section of the work piece offered!

Now your thinking "This is one stupid machinist!" Rof} But I had planed on using an adjustable parallel to support the work. :idea:



#217 Here's a group picture of yesterdays shop adventure. The lay out blue that missing from the pieces is not lost, its all over my hands! ::)



#218 Here's a better close up. H-1, H-2, and H-3. I know you guys like pictures. :D



#219 V-1 side plates as drawn in the plan set.



#220 V-2 My modified side plates, no plan at all, really. Slice and dice, just like a Butcher. Rof}



-MB ;D
 

marfaguy

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Wow!! Very impressive… and a little intimidating. I'm following along and understand
most of it (I think). It'll probably be quite awhile before I attempt something on
this level. But this has already answered some questions about securing work
that were rattling around in my noggin over the last couple of weeks.
 

Deanofid

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All of a sudden, they're looking like engines! The first assemblies where you can start putting big things together is always a fun part.
That was a lot of engine frame pieces Rick, and it looks like things are still going well. Thm:
 

njl

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Great thread MB, thanks for sharing your progress in such detail. I've really enjoyed watching. This site is just so brilliant for learning new ways of doing things, it really gives me inspiration to try new things.

Nick
 

Metal Butcher

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221) Glad to see the board back up. I spent most of my day down in the shop and drilled all the crank assemblies for dowel pins. With a better understanding of speed and feed I ran the 1/16" drill at 2500 rpm. I added #609 Loctite to the pins before installing them. I held the assemblies in the vise with very light pressure to avoid the possibility of distorting them. By light pressure, I mean that I snugged up on them with out using any thing but my finger grip on the hex end of the vises screw.



222) I drilled a 5/16' hole in a block of aluminum to try out my 1/16" broach. I started the broach in the m/d. I was amazed at how easily it cut with very light pressure.



223) Here you can see how thin the curled up chips are. I tried to unravel one to take a measurement, and it just crumbled into small pieces.



224) I finished up the broaching in a 1/2 ton arbor press. It to bad that these small ones have so little head room. The broackh worked great. It was very easy to cut the key-way with one light pass, and the surface finish produced by the broach is one of the best I have ever seen.



225) In the picture below you can see the test piece finished. I'll be using the same broaching process on the flywheels. And I will be machining the flywheels at a later date after I improve the rigidity of the tool post on my lathe.



226) To cut the 1/16" keyway on the crank shafts I decide to use a woodruff key seat cutter. I was originally planning on using an end mill, but decided against it. An end mill would have required multiple passes, and that would have taken more time than the simple fixture I made with 20 minutes of work. This way the rigidity issue, and the possibility of broken end mills was eliminated. One pass was all that was required, with zero chance of making an over size key way.



227) Below is a picture shot after a key way was cut. Once the fixture was adjusted and checked with indicators it became a very simple and repeatable method of producing identical key ways on all the crank shafts.



228) With all the machine work finished up, the crank shaft assemblies are ready for a final d-burring, and a little sanding.



-MB

 

Deanofid

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It's an impressive sight, five cranks in a row, Rick. They look great. Very nice work!
I've never invested in a broaching set. I take it from your writing that you like it.
Where did you buy this particular set?

As always, thanks for the update and pics.

Dean
 

Brian Rupnow

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Thanks Rick---All these years in the business, and I never really know how a manual broach worked. You have cleared that up for me. Great work!!!---Carry on.---brian
 

Metal Butcher

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Deanofid said:
It's an impressive sight, five cranks in a row, Rick. They look great. Very nice work!
I've never invested in a broaching set. I take it from your writing that you like it.
Where did you buy this particular set?

As always, thanks for the update and pics.

Dean
Thanks Dean. Getting all five done accurately was a big concern for me. As we all know the first time is always the hardest. Buying a quality set of broaches for occasional use is indeed a big investment. I searched around and found the set sale priced at Amazon.com. And yes, I'm very happy with the quality of the DuMont Minute Man set, its was well worth the price.

-MB
 

Metal Butcher

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Brian Rupnow said:
Thanks Rick---All these years in the business, and I never really know how a manual broach worked. You have cleared that up for me. Great work!!!---Carry on.---brian
Brian, Theirs not all that much to it. I just applied a little common sense and did it. Below is a link to what looks like good information. I should have looked for it prior to my first attempt.

I highly recommend to every one that's not an expert, reading or book marking this page is real a good idea.

"I took a shot in the dark, and hit the mark." -MB :big:

http://its.fvtc.edu/MachShop3/broach/BroachingIS.htm

-MB
 

Metal Butcher

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#229 In today's post I will show the start of what will become the two heads for the horizontal and vertical 'F-head' versions. I racked my brain for days trying to figure out how to go about making these seemingly simple parts. Today I decided I had enough of the confusion and started punching holes and making decisions as I went along.

I used my band saw to cut four rectangular pieces of aluminum. I know! its hard to believe how smooth the cuts turned out. I blame the sharp blade and the cutting fluid I applied to the blade before each cut. :D



#230 I milled the blocks very carefully and ended up with minus .000" x plus .001" or less! A good day in front of the mill. The recent tramming makes a big difference. I no-longer push on the mill's head to try and compensate for its north by northwest lean. It may be funny...but its true.



#231 Below I'm drilling and taping the two 6-32 blind holes in what will be the bottom, on the lower half of the 2 piece cylinder head. The bolts that hold the lower half of the head and the cylinder together come up through the frames top plate. Yes its very confusing, and I'm still not sure if I did every thing correctly. :shrug:



#232 Here I'm drilling the four clearance holes through the upper half of a cylinder head. The same 4 hole bolt circle will be drilled blind and threaded on the top of the lower head.



#233 I test fitted an upper half of a head to a lower half and every thing lined up perfectly. I'm amazed too.



#234 The reamed hole being added in the picture below is for the valves and guides on both the upper and lower halves of the head. This hole along with the same size hole in the center of the 4 bolt pattern will be used to secure the head halves for subsequent machining operations. These parts and procedures were starting to become more and more complicated as I went along.



#235 I decided to drill and ream the exhaust port holes while the upper halves of both heads were still rectangular. I felt it would easier to get as much drilling as possible out of the way.



#236 In the picture below I'm drilling and reaming the intake ports, Not the exhaust ports! I got confused and miss-marked the pieces with a sharpie pen. I put the intake ports on opposite sides of the upper halves of the heads. This will give me a choice of carburetor location on the horizontal version, and I'll use the remaining upper head the vertical version since it wont matter which side the carburetor is on.



#237 I started on a fixture block by drilling 2 through clearance holes for 6-32 screws, I'm using the same 2 bolt pattern used on the bottom of the lower half of the head. This way I can bolt the head onto the fixture from underneath.



#238 A hole central to the 4 bolt pattern was drilled and taped 10-24 in the fixture block. It will be used to bolt all 4 halves of the heads down for milling the tapered profile.



#239 The second threaded hole for bolting down the head halves, was determined by using the eye-ball method. The plans do not provide enough information to use any method other than a guess were a scribed line should be. I lined up on the scribed line and lightly locked the workpiece down with one bolt. While moving the table back forth I adjusted the work piece till the pointer tracked along the line. With it lined up, I locked the bolt down tight.



#240 I used the cone end of an edge finder to locate the quill position for drilling and tapping the second hold down bolt. These F-heads are turning into a pot-luck-smorgasbord!



#241 I bolted a head down and the line-up looks good to me. If the angles are off a tiny bit, they will never be noticed since there is no point of reference, and the plans don't give a dimension or angle.



#242 Here I'm adding the threaded 4 bolt head pattern to the fixture. The upper head halves have through holes that will allow the upper heads to machined from the top and bottom.



#243 Below is the parting shot of today's shop adventure. It was a very tedious day, and I'm still not sure if I got everything right. ???



-MB
 

Metal Butcher

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#244 With the fixture finished, and the upper and lower halves for the F-head mostly finished, the next step was to profile them. Using the two offset mounting points on the fixture the heads were bolted on for the angled cut. After one side was cut with an end mill the piece was flipped over and the second side was cut. This was done on all four of the halves that will make up two head assemblies.



#245 All four head-halves are ready for the next steps.



#246 I used my simple manual method to index the head assemblies in the milling vise to produce the radius. In a previous post I added 3/16" holes at the spark plug and valve locations to all four halves of the head assemblies. A flush pin going through both valve locations adds stability, and a protruding pin at the spark plug location is used as a support/pivot point on top of the vise.

Milling a pinned together pair of upper and lower halves saves some time, and assures a matching profile on the assembled heads. This is a very time consuming method with plenty of opening and closing the vise, and hand cranking along the Y-axis. You may end up with sore arms the next day, like I did.

Below is a picture of the first of the many incremental cuts it will take to create the .750" radius.



#247 Below is a shot of the last cut needed to create half of the the radius. This took about an hour, only three more to go! Someone pass me the tube of Bengay Ultra with pain relief! I know, quite complaining.



#248 I used a center cutting 3/4" end mill as a first step in creating the bored hole in the lower half of the head for the cylinder. A S/D drill would have worked equally well since a pilot hole was already in place. Its the hole that was used as the pivot point for profiling the radius.

This is the lower-half of the head assembly. It bolted down on the fixture from the bottom up using its 2X 6-32 mounting points



#249 I finished the bore to dimension using a small boring head. Nothing magical or complicated in this machining process.



#250 With the upper half bolted to the fixture up side down I machined out the combustion chamber. The first step was a plunge cut using a 5/8" end mill centered on the pivot/plug point, followed by cutting a trough to the center-line of the second pivot/valve point using a 3/8" end mill.



#251 In the picture below the upper head half was flipped over and bolted down top side up, drilled, tapped 1/4-32, and spot faced for the spark plug.



#252 I managed to finish up with filing,sanding, and test fitting of one head assembly for today's post. I'll finish up the other one latter on or tommorow.



My arms are still a little sore. :big:

-MB
 

gbritnell

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Very nice work Rick. Now it makes more sense to what you were trying to explain to me.
George
 

Metal Butcher

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gbritnell said:
Very nice work Rick. Now it makes more sense to what you were trying to explain to me.
George
Thanks for the compliment George.

I know that I'm not real good at explanations. Most people just smile and nod. :)

Half the time I get myself so confused, that even I don't understand! Rof}

-MB
 

Metal Butcher

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#253 Unfortunately I have just one picture for today's post. Yesterday I finished up with 4 hours of fileing and sanding the two F-Head assemblies. Today I filed all 20 of the frame plates. I started at 10:00 am and finished at 7:00 pm. These parts are much larger than what I'm used to, and took much longer than I would have imagined.

The yellow piece of chalk sitting on the file was 2" long when I started this morning. :Doh:



-MB
 
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