Stuart 10V - Missing Part I.D.

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GreenTwin

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Can anyone identify the circled part.

This is not my photo, but rather a random photo from the net.

I saw a resonably priced fully machined 10V kit on ebay, with a low bid on it, so I bid 2 more dollars, and I won the bid.

The advert says "Some missing parts", and the one I notice is the rectangular flat plate shape.

I don't need a Stuart 10V casting kit, but for that price, and fully machined, I grabbed it, and will put it on the shelf for a rainy day, or perhaps a swap for some other item I need.

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5177.jpg
 
A photo of my purchase.

Seems very nice being fully machined, not that I am against doing my own machining.

I normally would not purchase a kit machined, but the price was right.

Stuart lists this machine set of castings for $745.00, then add VAT tax and shipping across the pond.

I did well as far as the money, depending on how critical the missing piece is.

Did not come with drawings, but I don't need drawings if it is already machined.

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s-l1600.jpg
 
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Can anyone identify the circled part.

This is not my photo, but rather a random photo from the net.

I saw a resonably priced fully machined 10V kit on ebay, with a low bid on it, so I bid 2 more dollars, and I won the bid.

The advert says "Some missing parts", and the one I notice is the rectangular flat plate shape.

I don't need a Stuart 10V casting kit, but for that price, and fully machined, I grabbed it, and will put it on the shelf for a rainy day, or perhaps a swap for some other item I need.

.
View attachment 151953
Congratulations on your purchase. I almost placed a bid myself but I already have another 10h and one 10v casting kit.
It looks to me the part that missing is Stuart Part # AL605 CYLINDER LAGGING ALUMINIUM 1 1⁄8" x 3 3⁄4".
The other missing part is the 7ba spanner wrench I think?
 

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  • 10V-Parts-List.pdf
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I think you are correct.

Thanks much for that.

I don't really need this kit, but purchased it because of the price, so if anybody really wants this kit, I will consider passing it on at cost plus shipping.
It may be such a nice kit that I decide to keep it though.

We will see if it arrives intact in the mail.
It is amazing how many folks have put a bit of scotch tape on a box containing metal parts, shipped them out, and had the metal crash the end of the box open during shipping.
It has happened perhaps 5 times to me, so I never count on anything till it arrives at the door.

Its quite a shock to get an empty package at the door.
I am surprised that the shipping companies deliver an empty wrapper, but they do.

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I think you are correct.

Thanks much for that.

I don't really need this kit, but purchased it because of the price, so if anybody really wants this kit, I will consider passing it on at cost plus shipping.
It may be such a nice kit that I decide to keep it though.

We will see if it arrives intact in the mail.
It is amazing how many folks have put a bit of scotch tape on a box containing metal parts, shipped them out, and had the metal crash the end of the box open during shipping.
It has happened perhaps 5 times to me, so I never count on anything till it arrives at the door.

Its quite a shock to get an empty package at the door.
I am surprised that the shipping companies deliver an empty wrapper, but they do.

.
If you do decide to keep and assemble it, I can supply you info for making a replacement for it if you like?
 
The aluminium is actually a lot easier to work as it does not spring back anything like brass does and is also easier to work. The supplied item was anodized to make it look like the traditional blued iron but if you want bling then go with your brass, otherwise I find the aluminium paints up OK.
 
I have transitioned away from aluminum in the shop for anything except permanent pattern castings, using alloy 356.

I got tired of the tool bit and drill bit loading up with aluminum that was not heat treated, and the ease at which aluminum threads strip out.

So no aluminum in my shop except for casting work.

And while they did have aluminum at least back to the Wright Flyer engine days, and probably before, I think it was considered an exotic metal, and not normally used for engine work, especially old steam engines.

The adonized aluminum no doubt would look good, but from a personal standpoint, you will never see me wrap a piece of aluminum around cast iron engine (that is just my preference). Your chances of finding Bigfoot would be much better than me doing that.

Some folks create an alloy called aluminum-bronze, and the piece of it that someone sent me was absolutely hard as a rock.
I think aluminum-bronze could possibly be used in aerospace, but its machinability seems to be very low.
After seeing that piece of aluminum-bronze, I was cured of using any type of exotic metals.

I use gray cast iron, brass, or bronze, with aluminum 356 for pattern work, and that is it for me.
I have a lot of boat shaft bronze, but that material is so sticky as to be useless for other than ornamental purposes.

And I am phasing out brass too, since it makes for a very poor bearing material that wears out too fast.
Any brass that I have will probably be melted and alloyed into bearing bronze.

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So you will be throwing those Stuart extruded brass bearings into the melting pot along with the hot pressed brass eccentric strap/rod and conrod. ;)

And no chance of you doing any model aero engines either
 
Brass bearings ?
Yikes !

Well, I actually bought the Stuart kit because I like the Stuart brand a lot (it is an iconic brand), and it is fully machined, so I don't have to try and machine a smaller engine.

But mainly I bought it because it was 1/3 the price of the same kit from Stuart.

I will most likely keep it in its shrink-wrap package, and trade somebody something for it.

It is a great little kit; perhaps a bit on the small side for my tastes, but an ideal kit for someone perhaps looking to get into the hobby.

It was basically a steal because some of the parts were missing, but the missing parts turned out to be the wrench, and the lagging, which is pretty minor in my opinion.

I knew I would never see a 10V at that price again in my lifetime, much less a fully machined 10V for that price.

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And no chance of you doing any model aero engines either
I could do a sleeved aero engine, aluminum cast block with gray iron sleeve, but the bore would have to be 2" minimum.

So a big aero engine.

The trend these days in the model airplane world is BIG scale planes, as in like 12 foot wingspan planes.

I had a buddy who build a 1/2 scale piper cub.
I will look for those photos.
It was most impressive, and few well.
Total weight was over 200 lbs.
I think the wingspan was 18 feet.
A child could have literally flown in it.
Chainsaw engine.

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WCE4's image shows all the brass parts quite clearly, Stuart's did not use much in the way of bronze in the smaller engines yet how many 100s or 1000s have been running OK with brass bearings and also the big end and eccentric strap see just as many rotations.

Pat what will you use when it comes to making things like drip feed oilers, SERC greasers, various small electrical components, etc for your engines if you are not going to have brass in the workshop? These have traditionally been brass on full size as well as model engines and as there is no need for them to run against anything the bearing properties of bronze are not required.
 
I have some brass sheet, which I suspect was various sizes of shim stock left over from my dad's shop.

For a model engine running without load, no doubt brass would last forever.

I don't necessarily build model engines with no load.

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Also lasts well in all those Stuart engines that have found their way into small steam launches, driving dynamos, pumps, etc.

The softer grades of brass are better for cladding rather than shim stock, look for "Bending brass" or "half hard brass" CZ108 rather than the harder CZ120
 
I guess it really depends on the alloy.

There is a huge variety of brass/bronze alloys; so many that I can't really keep up with them all.

There also seems to be sort of a blurred definition of what the difference between brass and bronze is.

The old steam books often detail arguements between having a bearing material that is hard enough to last, and soft enough to not damage the journal.

It is much easier to replace a bearing than to remachine a journal on a crankshaft.

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I guess it really depends on the alloy.

There is a huge variety of brass/bronze alloys; so many that I can't really keep up with them all.

There also seems to be sort of a blurred definition of what the difference between brass and bronze is.

The old steam books often detail arguements between having a bearing material that is hard enough to last, and soft enough to not damage the journal.

It is much easier to replace a bearing than to remachine a journal on a crankshaft.

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Leading us back to babbet (sp?) bearings for exactly the same reasons.
 
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