Steam engine lubrication

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Hi Byron, I strongly advise you check the brass tube has adequate wall thickness for taking a thread. The Brass tube will be subjected to tensile loads, as well as hoop stress, and threads are horrible stress raisers. On top of that, at steam pressures and temperatures you have a loss of the order of 1/2 the yield strength of the brass..... If it is rated at 6 bar for normal room temperature, then it can only take less than half of that at superheated steam temperatures (I.E. less than 3 bar). A thread will reduce the wall thickness, thus raising the hoop and tensile stresses... This will be very significant. You can work out the safe working pressure reduction accordingly... Then you MUST consider the stress raiser of the thread causing a reduction for a factor of at least 3.5 ....
Please use compression olives, or machined conical end fittings silver soldered to the brass tubes. Just like the rest of us "Steam buffs".
Cheers,
K2
 

Bentwings

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Hi Byron, I strongly advise you check the brass tube has adequate wall thickness for taking a thread. The Brass tube will be subjected to tensile loads, as well as hoop stress, and threads are horrible stress raisers. On top of that, at steam pressures and temperatures you have a loss of the order of 1/2 the yield strength of the brass..... If it is rated at 6 bar for normal room temperature, then it can only take less than half of that at superheated steam temperatures (I.E. less than 3 bar). A thread will reduce the wall thickness, thus raising the hoop and tensile stresses... This will be very significant. You can work out the safe working pressure reduction accordingly... Then you MUST consider the stress raiser of the thread causing a reduction for a factor of at least 3.5 ....
Please use compression olives, or machined conical end fittings silver soldered to the brass tubes. Just like the rest of us "Steam buffs".
Cheers,
K2
thank you for the information I much in joy discussing these things . This little engine is full of threaded fittings which I had concerns exactly as you described I don’t realy think this engine system will ever see anything close to high pressures, now the boiler and superheater is a different story. So what you send as concerns are taken seriously I don’t really like these threaded pipes that are used and I’m thinking and working on working around and making improved connections. I agree the olive connections will be a good improvement on connections . I’ll be very cautious when getting into the advanced steam issues even my relatively simple boiler will be re examined as well as tested. I had one fitting hat had both internal and external threads . Notice “ had” the brass ipe is quite heavy wall and I’ve changed things around so there is less stress on connections . I have some stainless tubing used for brake lines this uses flared connection we have a double flare tool so it’s possible to make any kind of brake line. This stuff gets some incredible pressures at times especially disc brakes the flex hose has to be compatible too even my simple air line connection is under review to be converted to use this rather than @ decorative “ brass it’s easy to use brass as that seems standard other than copper . I see lots of copper things on the internet . It seems to work as long as the equipment is operated on condensed steam or vapor from boiling water. But “ real” steam is a different story as you pointed out. As it turns out you have been the first and only one to seem to question things . I much admire that.

I’m frustrated that I can’t get out in the shop to create things I need . The rest of the week has to be devoted to finishing the estate issues . As unpleasant as it is mentally it like high pressure steam . It has to be managed I have my own “ gages” blood pressure , blood ox content pulse monitor body temp. You would think I’m the steam engine . LOL I HAVE My own throttle.

Byron

I’m reconsidering what I wanted to do as more “ dreaming” as opposed to reality. My air compressor makes 135 psi available but I seriously doubt I could even use that. . It will be interesting to see some kind of torque curve and method of measuring it vs pressure . I’ll have the new couplings later today I think so I can finish getting these engine running
 
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Hi Byron,
Comments on Materials.
Stainless pipe for brakes, with the flared connection, is fine for Steam. I use copper brake pipe - as it is readily available and suits the size of pipework I want. I agree brass looks prettier. But Long-term, brass will de-Zincify. The Zinc will electrolytically "disappear" (it dissolves), leaving crumbly brass dust! Not good for carrying steam a high temperature. But Copper pipe does not do that, as it is just - Copper! The NWP of Brake pipe (5mm OD sold over in the UK) is about 30bar. (FOS of 8 and correlating for reduced tensile stress at Steam temperatures). So perfectly strong enough for carrying "Model" steam - which is limited in USA and Canada by the Regulations to steam at 100psi in Copper. (6Bar).
Similarly, we have discussed Aluminium dissolving in Steam (produces Hydrogen gas - VERY explosive!), but you think you are going to stay cool enough not to have a problem.
The copper pipework I use takes standard olives and compression joint nuts very nicely. BUT the rivet counters always say the fittings look "too big, and out-of-place" on my models. But they are quick, re-usable, reliable and safe - which suits me. So I make brass connectors to screw into "the job", and these have the outer-end machined to suit the compression fitting and the 5mm copper pipe. I feel safer operating steam engines that way.
Cheers!
K2
 

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thank you for the information I much in joy discussing these things . This little engine is full of threaded fittings which I had concerns exactly as you described I don’t realy think this engine system will ever see anything close to high pressures, now the boiler and superheater is a different story. So what you send as concerns are taken seriously I don’t really like these threaded pipes that are used and I’m thinking and working on working around and making improved connections. I agree the olive connections will be a good improvement on connections . I’ll be very cautious when getting into the advanced steam issues even my relatively simple boiler will be re examined as well as tested. I had one fitting hat had both internal and external threads . Notice “ had” the brass ipe is quite heavy wall and I’ve changed things around so there is less stress on connections . I have some stainless tubing used for brake lines this uses flared connection we have a double flare tool so it’s possible to make any kind of brake line. This stuff gets some incredible pressures at times especially disc brakes the flex hose has to be compatible too even my simple air line connection is under review to be converted to use this rather than @ decorative “ brass it’s easy to use brass as that seems standard other than copper . I see lots of copper things on the internet . It seems to work as long as the equipment is operated on condensed steam or vapor from boiling water. But “ real” steam is a different story as you pointed out. As it turns out you have been the first and only one to seem to question things . I much admire that.

I’m frustrated that I can’t get out in the shop to create things I need . The rest of the week has to be devoted to finishing the estate issues . As unpleasant as it is mentally it like high pressure steam . It has to be managed I have my own “ gages” blood pressure , blood ox content pulse monitor body temp. You would think I’m the steam engine . LOL I HAVE My own throttle.

Byron

I’m reconsidering what I wanted to do as more “ dreaming” as opposed to reality. My air compressor makes 135 psi available but I seriously doubt I could even use that. . It will be interesting to see some kind of torque curve and method of measuring it vs pressure . I’ll have the new couplings later today I think so I can finish getting these engine running
ive got some 1/4” copper tube that will work or intake manifold and exhaust manifold also have a bunch of 1/4” 90 deg elbows the tube slips into I’ll do a TIG silicone bronze braze when I’m ready the ports are threaded so I may make short thread cap screws with the stick I have I may have to just drill and tap mounting hole for the flanges I think it will look nice I just have not gone there yet I’m making a die to shap a collector for 4 1/4” tubes and another for the intake . If 1/2” copper is annealed it shapes easily . I used this in some scale functioning wexhaust in our Rc warbirds . Silicone bronze is very expensive but makes up for it by being very easy to braze the TIG allows easy heat adjustment I have a very smooth foot pedal too . As much as the latest pulse controls are used I’m rather old school and learned to use a pulse method with the pedal long before the automated stuff. I learned to use any part of my body that moved to control the pedal. I see well today but I still can use the pedal welding snd brazing in close quarters you operate by feel more than observation I think I seem to still have some feel left I can look at finished welds with mag glass to make sure they are correct . I’m glad I practiced “ welding sketches on my engineering grid paper my care person asked what I was doing one day . I said practicing.
She said, what artwork? I said no, these are weld seams I’m welding them ???????together ?????

Byron
 

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ive got some 1/4” copper tube that will work or intake manifold and exhaust manifold also have a bunch of 1/4” 90 deg elbows the tube slips into I’ll do a TIG silicone bronze braze when I’m ready the ports are threaded so I may make short thread cap screws with the stick I have I may have to just drill and tap mounting hole for the flanges I think it will look nice I just have not gone there yet I’m making a die to shap a collector for 4 1/4” tubes and another for the intake . If 1/2” copper is annealed it shapes easily . I used this in some scale functioning wexhaust in our Rc warbirds . Silicone bronze is very expensive but makes up for it by being very easy to braze the TIG allows easy heat adjustment I have a very smooth foot pedal too . As much as the latest pulse controls are used I’m rather old school and learned to use a pulse method with the pedal long before the automated stuff. I learned to use any part of my body that moved to control the pedal. I see well today but I still can use the pedal welding snd brazing in close quarters you operate by feel more than observation I think I seem to still have some feel left I can look at finished welds with mag glass to make sure they are correct . I’m glad I practiced “ welding sketches on my engineering grid paper my care person asked what I was doing one day . I said practicing.
She said, what artwork? I said no, these are weld seams I’m welding them ???????together ?????

Byron sorry I forgot to measure wall of the brass pipe . It’s .032 in as close as I can measure with my “ very near” caliper
byron
 

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I’ll be more gentle this time around. The flywheel made a mess on the crankshaft I can fix it but I’ll be glad to use a clamping method instead of set screws the bad part is this is the short side of the crank so not a lot of room. My thought was that the long ends would connect with the flywheel easier, plus’s it shows that in the assembly pictures. So I may have to reverse the crank on one engine . It’s not hard but tedious there are lots of screws and bearing shells.

I was adjusting the timing , engine stopped before it stopped itself . Th timing between cylinders is different by measurement . I’m goingvto look very carefully as I reset things . I think the timings Gould be the same cylinder to cylinder as the con rod bearings are in the same relative position . I’ll start with equal timing , keeping the difference in mind as a change if necessary once this is established I’ll set the other engine up the same and test them individually . The flywheel is designed to connect both engines the cranks do line up near perfect . I have a flexible coupler in case I need it . I have an interconnecting hose or pipe so the intakes can be equal . It appears this is the intent . Back in the days ofvthe big ten engine dragsters there was always a debate about equal timing vs off set both worked . It will be fun to work with this feature.
Byron
 

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I’ll be more gentle this time around. The flywheel made a mess on the crankshaft I can fix it but I’ll be glad to use a clamping method instead of set screws the bad part is this is the short side of the crank so not a lot of room. My thought was that the long ends would connect with the flywheel easier, plus’s it shows that in the assembly pictures. So I may have to reverse the crank on one engine . It’s not hard but tedious there are lots of screws and bearing shells.

I was adjusting the timing , engine stopped before it stopped itself . Th timing between cylinders is different by measurement . I’m goingvto look very carefully as I reset things . I think the timings Gould be the same cylinder to cylinder as the con rod bearings are in the same relative position . I’ll start with equal timing , keeping the difference in mind as a change if necessary once this is established I’ll set the other engine up the same and test them individually . The flywheel is designed to connect both engines the cranks do line up near perfect . I have a flexible coupler in case I need it . I have an interconnecting hose or pipe so the intakes can be equal . It appears this is the intent . Back in the days ofvthe big ten engine dragsters there was always a debate about equal timing vs off set both worked . It will be fun to work with this feature.
Byron
ive oiled things up pretty well now . Both engines turn over smoothly with no tight spots so I’m happy about that they realy don’t take much to turn them so I’ll not use any more pressure
than necessary . I plan on using less than 10 psi for initial testing I’ll measure rpm with my electronic tach . That may be enough to run both at the same time . I have hose connection to permit this.
 
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Hi Byron,
Initially, I would reckon that SAME timing is best. That way you avoid the 2 cranks "fighting" across the coupling. a 45degree "out-of-phase" may seem like a smoother power delivery from the end of the crank, but will stress the coupling mightily as the torque peaks of one crank hit the torque troughs of the other, then back again. Much better to have them "in-phase". - IMHO.
K2
 

Bentwings

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Hi Byron,
Initially, I would reckon that SAME timing is best. That way you avoid the 2 cranks "fighting" across the coupling. a 45degree "out-of-phase" may seem like a smoother power delivery from the end of the crank, but will stress the coupling mightily as the torque peaks of one crank hit the torque troughs of the other, then back again. Much better to have them "in-phase". - IMHO.
K2
that was my thought too. I though that getting big engines to run the same speed with equal pressure would eliminate or reduce pulsing the couplers can handle some depending on which style is used but we aren’t talking coupling two 800 hp engines together that run 7500 rpm or more. LOL

Back to the shop
Byron
 

Bentwings

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that was my thought too. I though that getting big engines to run the same speed with equal pressure would eliminate or reduce pulsing the couplers can handle some depending on which style is used but we aren’t talking coupling two 800 hp engines together that run 7500 rpm or more. LOL

Back to the shop
Byron
you really hit a point there I’ll deal with the heat and pressure as you cautioned . I have som magnesium anodes that I’ll try fore anti corrosion that I used on my boat these won’t be in fire situations or even melting temps I don’t like machining mag in the first place I’ve seen enough mag fires over the years that I don’t intend to even do any machine work on them. On the boat they worked very well. Just a yearly replacement with periodical inspections . I’m planning a little test later done out doors of course just to see how these work in a steam environment Zinc Is harder to come by lately but mag is still a good anodic material
Byron
 

Bentwings

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you really hit a point there I’ll deal with the heat and pressure as you cautioned . I have som magnesium anodes that I’ll try fore anti corrosion that I used on my boat these won’t be in fire situations or even melting temps I don’t like machining mag in the first place I’ve seen enough mag fires over the years that I don’t intend to even do any machine work on them. On the boat they worked very well. Just a yearly replacement with periodical inspections . I’m planning a little test later done out doors of course just to see how these work in a steam environment Zinc Is harder to come by lately but mag is still a good anodic material
Byron
that’s my thought too .

I just got another pair of couplers I though I ordered 4 so I have to go back and check. I got the damaged shaft fixed finally . The flywheel must have had a small piece of steel caught in it I got a 6 mm drill bit to slip through it but there was a tight spot. I just kept working it by hand until the bit slid through then tried the W on the shaft . It fits nice now there may be a little out of roundness but it will have to be that way . I made a sketch of the existing timing by measurement so I just have to check the piston and connecting shaft lock nuts. Then lock tite them , much as I don’t like the wicking loc tite I’ve managed to break it free by gently heating the shaft . That says something too . Hot steam isn’t goingvto do any good so I’ll have to be extra careful tightening the nuts there is not enough thread showing to double nut . I’m goingvto measure the shafts and thread count then I think new shafts with a few extra threads are in order I’ve go 2 new m 3 dies . I YHINK maybe 303 stainless might be the choice . It being a bit easier to machine I have extra stainless nuts I looked at my lock nuts but there just isn’t much room .nylon lock features did not fare well in vibration tests in industry . Best was proper torque without washers for locking adding heat just loosened lock tite .
 

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that’s my thought too .

I just got another pair of couplers I though I ordered 4 so I have to go back and check. I got the damaged shaft fixed finally . The flywheel must have had a small piece of steel caught in it I got a 6 mm drill bit to slip through it but there was a tight spot. I just kept working it by hand until the bit slid through then tried the W on the shaft . It fits nice now there may be a little out of roundness but it will have to be that way . I made a sketch of the existing timing by measurement so I just have to check the piston and connecting shaft lock nuts. Then lock tite them , much as I don’t like the wicking loc tite I’ve managed to break it free by gently heating the shaft . That says something too . Hot steam isn’t goingvto do any good so I’ll have to be extra careful tightening the nuts there is not enough thread showing to double nut . I’m goingvto measure the shafts and thread count then I think new shafts with a few extra threads are in order I’ve go 2 new m 3 dies . I YHINK maybe 303 stainless might be the choice . It being a bit easier to machine I have extra stainless nuts I looked at my lock nuts but there just isn’t much room .nylon lock features did not fare well in vibration tests in industry . Best was proper torque without washers for locking adding heat just loosened lock tite .
i didn’t notice the difference in timing at first I YHINK I’ll pull the piston valve blocks off and compare where the piston valve ports are in relation to each other. They are not the same at TDC like I thought they should be even allowing for the crank rod journals being different angles . I have new m 3 dies and some 303 stainless round stock coming so I’ll
Make slightly longer connecting rods this will give mor threads through the pistons for the attaching nut . If necessary I’ll counter bore the cylinder heads for extra clearance . What really happened was the piston nut came loose this locked the rotating assembly. It must have happens just as the assembly was stopping as there is no marks where it might have been rattling around . Lucky me I guess. I didn’t really like the mounting as it was . I wish the piston was fitted with a wrist pin rather than this bolt on method. But I see this done in other engines too . I may just reconsider the piston myself and make the modifications. There is the cylinder packing gland to consider too so the new con rod won’t be as easy as a round rod . I’m thinking some kind of straight bore with the packing for sealing. Just more complications
 
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Hi Byron, you should not need the complexity of a wrist pin on the piston. In fact the rigid connection between the piston and cross head is standard for lots of reasons. The cross-head takes the side-thrust from the con-rod (as does an infernal combustion engine piston skirt) and the thin piston takes driving pressure alternating above and below the piston, so needs the seal at the gland to maintain the pressure during that power stroke. Hence a rigid connection is required to keep the cross-head, gland and piston in true alignment.
K2
 

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Hi Byron, you should not need the complexity of a wrist pin on the piston. In fact the rigid connection between the piston and cross head is standard for lots of reasons. The cross-head takes the side-thrust from the con-rod (as does an infernal combustion engine piston skirt) and the thin piston takes driving pressure alternating above and below the piston, so needs the seal at the gland to maintain the pressure during that power stroke. Hence a rigid connection is required to keep the cross-head, gland and piston in true alignment.
K2
ok I’ll scrap that idea what you say makes sense and that is the way it works. The piston valves do slide smoothly . I got some Teflon tubing with 3 mm inside dia so I can make a solid packing that will expand as it is tightened . Also got new 3 mm dies so I can make new rods just a little longer . This wicking lock tite is like super glue it sets pretty fast , minutes and it is thickened.
Another interruption there is a large custom car show. I was a member of the group through the car club I was in back then our club won the club display 3 years in a row . Our dragster won best appearing Ali those 3?years. We eere known as activists then not letting the sponsor group get away with any thing weird. I wish I had the picture of us “ outlaws that was taken when the promised tee shirts did not arrive in time for the event our grip removed or tee shirts then some one painted “ Where are our tee shirts in black grease on our chests” all of us were guys hat got dirty at work or play . We then made a trip to the group meeting and all stood together displaying our displeasure . No riots or violence . The group was a sub division of a major group of city politicians and “ important “ people it was a very big deal back then as this group was highly respected in the public eyes. . We got our tee shirts about a week later with a price reduction.

I ran into a couple of the guys that were there at the time today. We had a few good laughs together . So it was worth it today. I’m back at now . Hopefully get a test run in .
 

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ok I’ll scrap that idea what you say makes sense and that is the way it works. The piston valves do slide smoothly . I got some Teflon tubing with 3 mm inside dia so I can make a solid packing that will expand as it is tightened . Also got new 3 mm dies so I can make new rods just a little longer . This wicking lock tite is like super glue it sets pretty fast , minutes and it is thickened.
Another interruption there is a large custom car show. I was a member of the group through the car club I was in back then our club won the club display 3 years in a row . Our dragster won best appearing Ali those 3?years. We eere known as activists then not letting the sponsor group get away with any thing weird. I wish I had the picture of us “ outlaws that was taken when the promised tee shirts did not arrive in time for the event our grip removed or tee shirts then some one painted “ Where are our tee shirts in black grease on our chests” all of us were guys hat got dirty at work or play . We then made a trip to the group meeting and all stood together displaying our displeasure . No riots or violence . The group was a sub division of a major group of city politicians and “ important “ people it was a very big deal back then as this group was highly respected in the public eyes. . We got our tee shirts about a week later with a price reduction.

I ran into a couple of the guys that were there at the time today. We had a few good laughs together . So it was worth it today. I’m back at now . Hopefully get a test run in .
I did consider the brass pipes that came in the assembly . I didn’t likevtahr some were used fo “ hang” things on or support other parts . I have the doubly ugly hose now replacing this. It still requires a brass fitting to make the hard connection. Anything I need to make will be bronze or stainless from here out . Most likely I’ll be relegated to using water laden “ steam vapor” like many others . I can see slimy messes but I’ll be able to control that I YHINK . It mainly getting things back together . In looking at timing and what I see others doing I think I’ll be ok. I just looked for some small degree wheels that I could permanently mount . Looks like a custom part I YHINK also we use special degrees tape to install on crank pulleys on the hot rods. Of cours nothing exists for our models. I even looked at whit vinyl electrical tape . Checked prices on that lately ? Well I don’t need 100 yds for sure. I did find flat white model pant so I YHINK I’ll just use that and scribe timing mark in it . Itvrenewable too . I have a distal angle square that works very well . I was justvgettingvreadyvtobre test at the stop point but I’m goingvto te set everything according to what I have gained in the last week. I had to start from an “ about” position so I’ll have much more accurate start point that I can record an make calibrated moves . Now that I have a better understandindingbofvhowctge piston valve works. Everything seems pretty well fixed now . Definitely will use low and gradual pressure. I do have a throttle valve to mount . I’ll try and put a pressure gage in the intake line so I can see what the engine is using . Another very windy nasty day today.. not going out today if I don’t have to .

In view ofvthe see though small engine tests going on I considered making a clear plastic piston valve chamber but I don’t really have an easy way to create a polished bore for the piston valve . . I YHINK it will be enough to be able to adjust the position and observe how it runs.

Byron
 

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Hi Byron,
Initially, I would reckon that SAME timing is best. That way you avoid the 2 cranks "fighting" across the coupling. a 45degree "out-of-phase" may seem like a smoother power delivery from the end of the crank, but will stress the coupling mightily as the torque peaks of one crank hit the torque troughs of the other, then back again. Much better to have them "in-phase". - IMHO.so far it’s been a bad day terrible weather. Then I just could not get the crankshafts smooth enough. I really did a number on them. They don’t look very bad but everything fits so close that thes lightest burr or imperfection locks things up . I finally got the small steel flywheel to fit and one of the eccentrics bak together . They have a central main bearing then a bolt on retaining flange these have flat head screws locating and attaching . I originally assembled them on a straight shaft to make sure the shaft holes stayed in alignment . It’s taken a while but I finally got them back together an cleaned out the shaft holes. I had to wrap a small strip of very fine Emory paper aroun the plain end of a drill bit to hone them out the retainer flange gets out of position due to the flathead screw counter sink holes . I got bit to fit now but I had to tsk the piston port cylinders off to remove the eccentrics from the crank shafts I going to got metric end mills today so I’m going to try and counter bore a couple shaft collars so I can use them as clamping locks so I can leave the set screws out . This will give me the adjustability I noted . I have some couplers that could serve the same purpose but I can save some shaft length by using the collars . There are not collars like this available that I could find. I may be able to screw a small collar to a counter bored one . That would make the adjustment easier . I did a bunch of reading on piston port or valve timing today . I YHINK what I’m trying to do is consistent to eat is done in larger scale I also looked for some small degree wheels but I think I’ll just have to mark the flywheels like we mark auto front dampeners for visible timing . They note having a small space above and below the power piston for cushioning I have that so hopefully the Port timing will be such that it pis used,
K2
 

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Minnesota
im working on things now I’ve got couplers shaft collars . I’ve even got some with bores too small. I just wish I could get to the shop to fix some of this tomorrow I’m goingvto try and counter bore a couple shaft collars with an end mill in the Mickey mous drill press. I actually have an exact fitting coupling so I may use thatvtonjojoin the engines The main flywheel has a bit larger hub and I couldn’t get a coupling for it to the two shafts I’m goingvto try and drill and tap a couple collars the screw them together temp fix. Essentially it will make a solid coupling just shorter. On eccentric cut a deep scratch in the crankshaft that just took forever to polish out. The cranks are stainless an I suspect quite hard due to work hardening in machining. They obviously used some very fine feeds as finishbis smooth but the surface is hard. My small fils just slid over the grooves . It took a lot of polishing with several grades of Emory paper to fixe the damage yet not reduce the diameter . I had to run scrap through the set screw holes to pick the bent threads out once I got that cleared I finished the bores nicely . Parts all are nice slip fits very close to original. I did a temporary mount of one flywheel and eccentric then went through the timing process I came up with. I can now verify power piston TDC and BDC then measure the piston valve position with my “ very near” calipers they or it reads metric , English English fractions to 1/64 and decimal . I can set the piston valve pretty exact now that I know that works it will be a matter of testing and seeing results then making a chart. I don’t know if system pressure, rpm and timing are related close enough to take note, but now I’ll be able to test it . Certainly better than the “ about thing in pictures . “ I have connecting hoses already made to join both engines once get both running the same tune up . Drag racing term . Since these will be operating on compressed air to start with I can call the operating pressure “ boost” since it essentially is supercharging. I’m goingvto go much easier starting this time around I didn’t have much pressure originally but I’m more conservative this time around . The hose is so ugly but it’s very strong. I’m sure I could use smaller nicer looking hose but function is the driver here.
I got a nifty very small electric screw driver for installing and removing screws. It has both 1/4” hex and some other much smaller hex . Look like watch making drivers. It’s supposed to rain and sleet allthecrestvofcthecweek . I’ll only havectongonoutvto take the garbage out . I hate to see the heat bill this month .
Byron
 
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