Powder paint for model engines

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Brian Rupnow

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I'm not ready to go back into the machine shop yet, but that doesn't stop me from thinking about things. Does anyone on the forum use a powder paint coating system to paint their models with? I have an old hot-rod friend who had a powder paint system he used restoring motorcycles, but has had a stroke and no longer uses his powder paint system. I called him up this week to see about buying it, but he had sold it a couple of years ago. I've watched videos of people using Harbor Freight (not available in Canada) and Princess Auto powder paint systems, and they seem to give a very nice even thick scratch-proof coating to metal parts. But---The system available from Princess Auto in Canada costs $225 plus 13% tax and does not include any of the actual paint powders. That takes it out of dollar range for me, so I will go on using either no paint or else spray bombs of automotive paint. Just curious-----Brian
 
I'm not ready to go back into the machine shop yet, but that doesn't stop me from thinking about things. Does anyone on the forum use a powder paint coating system to paint their models with? I have an old hot-rod friend who had a powder paint system he used restoring motorcycles, but has had a stroke and no longer uses his powder paint system. I called him up this week to see about buying it, but he had sold it a couple of years ago. I've watched videos of people using Harbor Freight (not available in Canada) and Princess Auto powder paint systems, and they seem to give a very nice even thick scratch-proof coating to metal parts. But---The system available from Princess Auto in Canada costs $225 plus 13% tax and does not include any of the actual paint powders. That takes it out of dollar range for me, so I will go on using either no paint or else spray bombs of automotive paint. Just curious-----Brian
Quinn (Blondiehacks) has been using Eastwood’s powder coat kit and powder from a number of sources. Try dropping her an email/message through her YT channel - now that she’s back in Canada she may have some local-ish sources.
 
I have the Harbor Freight powder coat package and it works extremely well. It only cost me about $60 here in the US. There has to be other sources you can get one at a better price, Amazon, Ebay, Aliexpress, the list goes on. A pound of powder costs about $15 and goes a extremely long way. I use a toaster oven from a thrift shop for small pieces and a electric stoves oven that I got for free for larger parts.
 
Sparky---That's a heck of a price difference. I will check some of the sources you mention.---Brian
Its been a few years and I am pretty sure I used one of Harbor Freights coupons and of course there is that lovely inflation everywhere. The prices you routinely mention you pay in Canada always shock me.

I am sure you would love powder coating, it is actually easier than spray painting.
 
I got a Vevor powder painting kit which seems OK. Vevor seems to come at various prices whether direct or from Ali express so check first.
 
I'm guessing you know what kind of heating system to use? I inherited an electric oven that worked fine out in my garage. I'm pretty sure a gas oven has too much stuff that doesn't work for powder coating.
 
I'm guessing you know what kind of heating system to use? I inherited an electric oven that worked fine out in my garage. I'm pretty sure a gas oven has too much stuff that doesn't work for powder coating.
Toaster oven works great for small parts that will fit. Electric stove oven for larger parts. Gas oven is bad idea. NEVER use the kitchen oven, the smell will be there forever !
 
Brian you might fine the attached of interest. It describes a method of making a simple Tribo gun for powder coating. Chris Gabel gave this lecture at the last Midlands Model Engineering show. He very kindly supplied me with a copy noting that he held the copyright but was happy for folk to have a copy for personal use, I have previously posted this presentation. The quality of the coating using Chris's method was very good and robust.
Best wishes
Mike
 

Attachments

  • Chris-Gabel-Powder-Coating-MMEE-with-notes.pdf
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Very interesting article on the homebrew Tribo powder gun ! On the last page it states that Tribo and Corona powders may not be interchangeable. That could be a consideration, powders for Corona guns are by far the most common. I never knew there were different powders for different types of guns. The company I normally buy from (Prismatic coatings) has over 7000 colors and types of powders BUT I believe they are intended for Corona type systems.
 
I'm not ready to go back into the machine shop yet, but that doesn't stop me from thinking about things. Does anyone on the forum use a powder paint coating system to paint their models with? I have an old hot-rod friend who had a powder paint system he used restoring motorcycles, but has had a stroke and no longer uses his powder paint system. I called him up this week to see about buying it, but he had sold it a couple of years ago. I've watched videos of people using Harbor Freight (not available in Canada) and Princess Auto powder paint systems, and they seem to give a very nice even thick scratch-proof coating to metal parts. But---The system available from Princess Auto in Canada costs $225 plus 13% tax and does not include any of the actual paint powders. That takes it out of dollar range for me, so I will go on using either no paint or else spray bombs of automotive paint. Just curious-----Brian

I like painting parts with Lacquer. Unless painting over old paint then Rust-oleum.

When I was painting tons of casting I would dip in Rust-oleum.

Dave
 
I'm not ready to go back into the machine shop yet, but that doesn't stop me from thinking about things. Does anyone on the forum use a powder paint coating system to paint their models with? I have an old hot-rod friend who had a powder paint system he used restoring motorcycles, but has had a stroke and no longer uses his powder paint system. I called him up this week to see about buying it, but he had sold it a couple of years ago. I've watched videos of people using Harbor Freight (not available in Canada) and Princess Auto powder paint systems, and they seem to give a very nice even thick scratch-proof coating to metal parts. But---The system available from Princess Auto in Canada costs $225 plus 13% tax and does not include any of the actual paint powders. That takes it out of dollar range for me, so I will go on using either no paint or else spray bombs of automotive paint. Just curious-----Brian
Blondi Hacks just released a video on powder coating the frame components for a Pennsy A3 Switcher. Mark Presling also does a lot of powder finishing using a repurposed kitchen oven. I'm thinking i should make the leap.
 
I just checked the Eastwood powder paint kit. (The same kit Blondi-Hacks uses) On sale right now for $180 USA comes to $256 Canadian. Plus a compressed air source (which I have) plus a toaster oven of some kind, plus shipping to Canada. Still way to much money for the Rupnow fortune.
 
I just checked the Eastwood powder paint kit. (The same kit Blondi-Hacks uses) On sale right now for $180 USA comes to $256 Canadian. Plus a compressed air source (which I have) plus a toaster oven of some kind, plus shipping to Canada. Still way to much money for the Rupnow fortune.
I realize you don't have harbor freight available to you but I just ckecked them for a price. $79 Much better than eastwoods $180 https://www.harborfreight.com/search?q=powder coating systems

Ebay seems to be $130 US. One on amazon US for $97 that looks identical to the harbor freight system.
 
The only caution I have about powder painting is the experience of a fellow modeler who had the cylinder of his hot air engine powder-coated after all the machining operations were over. This was a cylinder of fairly thin walls but it distorted during the heat curing phase and could not be corrected.
 
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