Looking for input on a cylinder block corrosion issue.

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if you are using coolant the race car guys can not use water based coolants so everybody uses Evans waterless coolant . This stuff is expensive, about $25 per gallon, but it’s amazing stuff it’s way better than water based coolant , does nt coorode and is a supplier coolant often curing over heating in race cars .
Hi Eccentric, I have just been reading #27 again, as I replied to Badhippie about filling from top or bottom, but may have confused others as I definitely woke in the night (for other reasons) and pondered what was really happening...? - So, take it that I am confused...?
In your thought experiment (My middle of the night insomnia hobby!) I reckon you have a drain on the outlet. In the model you have a tank - the engine, etc. - presumably with top and bottom connections, and a water pump to make it flow (Thermo-syphon needs a large head to work - Models do not have enough height to create a useful density related pressure difference to develop the flow required...).
Hence, with a "second tank" attached to your fish tank - probably closed, not open to atmosphere, and maybe below the fish tank, I guess you will simply fill from the top connection until all the air is expelled from the bottom (closed) tank through the top tank (as a vent) until the top tank fills to the required level?
Does that help resolve the confusion? (Or maybe I'm the only one who is confused?).
Can you post a phot of your model - and a cooling-circuit diagram perhaps?
Ta,
K2
 
Obvious issue with obvious solutions. Don't go inventing causes here. Loctite products are petro plastics and do not induce corrosion. You need to use engine coolant over cast iron and/ or steel cylinder liners. You can spay paint the cylinders in contact with the coolant.
Petro plastics products are from the field of organic compounds and can be made acidic, basic or neutral they can if improperly used cause all kinds of corrosion. They are applied as a liquid and usually hardened with time. Their use is predicated on a chemical reaction occurring. Hopefully the right one for the purpose you are using them for.
 
Petro plastics products are from the field of organic compounds and can be made acidic, basic or neutral they can if improperly used cause all kinds of corrosion. They are applied as a liquid and usually hardened with time. Their use is predicated on a chemical reaction occurring. Hopefully the right one for the purpose you are using them for.
Thanks HMEL, of course appropriate applications. As such.... Loctite products are used on plastics and ferrous and non-ferrous metals. plastics, porous and non porous organics and synthetics without issues.
 
You might be interested to know that the locktite fluid compatibility chart has a special exemption for potable water. Possibly because of the chlorine or other additives I would guess as potential problems. This loctite is not on the list. All other types of water are more tolerable to a number of products.

https://www.new-line.com/nldocs/resources/Loctite_Fluid_Compatibility_Chart.pdf
HMEL
Might have more to do with NSF ratings on specific products.


Edit, whoops did not see how old this thread was sorry.
 
Might have more to do with NSF ratings on specific products.


Edit, whoops did not see how old this thread was sorry.
Yes it is old, but most manufactures do extensive coupon tests in various media to develop their charts. Its normally not expensive to do but it does require good labs to conduct them. These charts are never perfect but they are a very good guide. Not sure how the NSF ratings are developed but many times in using products people do not pay attention to the products limitations.
 
Yes it is old, but most manufactures do extensive coupon tests in various media to develop their charts. Its normally not expensive to do but it does require good labs to conduct them. These charts are never perfect but they are a very good guide. Not sure how the NSF ratings are developed but many times in using products people do not pay attention to the products limitations.
You mean there are potentially things that JB weld can't do?! Blasphemous!


But yes, point well taken.
 
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