Fusion 360 learning ?s

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Shopgeezer

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Nice looking work. It would be interesting to see it exploded. I am curious to know the difference between Fusion and Inventor. As I understand it Fusion is so named because it is designed to produce files useful for a variety of production techniques (3D print, CNC, laser, water jet etc ). Inventor can apparently animate a model so that you can run an engine in virtual and see if anything is hitting where it shouldn’t. Do they use the same workspace for creating models? I wonder if you have to learn a whole new skillset for Inventor.
 

Technical Ted

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Another new, very good beginner, YouTube series is from Brad Tallis who also works for AutoDesk. He goes through things very, very slowly and is great for the beginner who might be struggling.

Here's one example on constraints:


Ted
 
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Another new, very good beginner, YouTube series is from Brad Tallis who also works for AutoDesk. He goes through things very, very slowly and is great for the beginner who might be struggling.

Here's one example on constraints:


Ted
Thanks for this link to Brad's channel. I have found that most fusion video producers fly thru actions wayyyy too quickly to follow and take notes, which is just as bad as the low resolution vids.
 
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Nice looking work. It would be interesting to see it exploded. I am curious to know the difference between Fusion and Inventor. As I understand it Fusion is so named because it is designed to produce files useful for a variety of production techniques (3D print, CNC, laser, water jet etc ). Inventor can apparently animate a model so that you can run an engine in virtual and see if anything is hitting where it shouldn’t. Do they use the same workspace for creating models? I wonder if you have to learn a whole new skillset for Inventor.
If you're speaking about my work I'll do exploded view later. I'm just finishing up another design at the moment and learning how to output the designs to PDF...

The one thing I haven't seen is if there is a simple way to achieve exploded view in the model space without losing your carefully plotted out origin points for the assembled product.

ps, using coils to create knurling uses loads of processing resources and slows all other subsequent graphics actions... at least with my knurling where my pattern uses 90 copies of the coil. If you must use that method apply it at the end.
 

Technical Ted

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I don't know if this will help you, but you can save "Named Views" by right mouse clicking on Named Views in the tree and saving a custom view you have created.

Ted
 
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I don't know if this will help you, but you can save "Named Views" by right mouse clicking on Named Views in the tree and saving a custom view you have created.

Ted
A quick search showed me the best method is to make the exploded view in the animation section. I haven't played with that yet
 
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A quick search showed me the best method is to make the exploded view in the animation section. I haven't played with that yet
Well, that was easy.


From finished design in the model mode go to the animation mode.

Expand the components tree... control click to select every component that you wish to show up in the animation and output drawing.

Go to transform tool in the ribbon menu. Select auto expand all, or just one level if you wish. Boom. Expanded. You may need to move parts around for clarity but that's intuitive.

Then enter Drawing mode. select sheet size, scale etc etc and export to pdf.

upload_2019-1-30_16-32-5.png
 
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Exporting exploded views using the animation mode is pretty neat and easy feature.

I couldnt hep but try it again on my incomplete electronic indexer based on PF70-5C spin indexer.

upload_2019-1-30_17-48-11.png
 

Brian Hutchings

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Many thanks to Jack3M for the introduction to Fusion 360 videos. I had already tried Fusion 360 and given up because I couldn't get anywhere with it but Lars made it look much more achievable so I will start again.
 

Jack3M

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Yes also Brad is good, but I think Lars 3 video beginner series is where to start, then they both have their place. Brad has made things clear that Lars did not and vice versa
 

n1326e

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Yes also Brad is good, but I think Lars 3 video beginner series is where to start, then they both have their place. Brad has made things clear that Lars did not and vice versa
I also found Lars' videos to be too fast for my pea brain, so I settled on Phil McWharter's series on YouTube called, IIRC, "Fusion 360 or die trying". His 'basic' lessons were what got me over the initial learning curve. So now I use Sketchup and Fusion 360 (free), I used them both for 3D printing but now I'm getting started with CNC (2.5D). For those of you into CNC, I'm just learning a relatively new open source program called CAMBAM, you might want to check it out.
 

Jack3M

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There were a few that I had to back up on. No big deal to me. You do realize you can do CAM also with Fusion?
 

lemelman

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I've been using TurboCAD for a number of years and started using F360 about 18 months ago. The difference between the two systems is considerable and initially I used Fusion only for rather simple models destined for 3D printing and switched back to TCAD for complicated drawings. With increased experience I've recently been creating rather complicated assemblies using joints etc. I've now even started to do simple simulations employing finite state analysis, which revealed unexpected weakness in the design of something for the charity for which I do voluntary work. It saved a lot of money in time and materials.
For simple things, Fusion is easy to use, but, like all CAD systems, proficiency requires experience. The numerous tutorials available help a lot, but I've found that the very best way of learning is to have a specific personal project to do. Its amazing how much you learn when you need to do something specific to your own design.
All CAD programs are complicated beasts and are impossible to use proficiently without devoting weeks or months in learning them. Once the penny has dropped you realise how useful they are.
 
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I've been using TurboCAD for a number of years...

All CAD programs are complicated beasts and are impossible to use proficiently without devoting weeks or months in learning them. Once the penny has dropped you realise how useful they are.
Amen. I began using DOS based Drafix sketch product in the 1980s. Autodesk bought out the company it was such a threat, then they migrated that DOS based product to windows and lost it's innate simplicity and ease of use. I hung onto my DOS copies and pen plotter set-up for a year as a fall-back speedy option while I slowly learned Autosketch 9 for windows. Autosketch 9 wasn't nearly worth the cost being far inferior to the old DOS and not nearly as powerful as full CAD. So I migrated to AutoCad release 12. In 2008 I went to AutoCad Lt 2008. I refuse to go to their new over priced subscription, so I keep an old desktop with xp installed.

Getting to my point, I concur 100% that to use such products well requires commitment and regular use. Before I stopped working entirely I suffered intermittent disability that kept me off work for a couple months each time. I found that returning to work on HVAC designs my CAD skills were rusty and my design times went up.

I look at new software from time to time, but to really be able to use 3D modeling efficiently and effectively you need to commit, and use it exclusively and often. That means going back over all your model plans that you know intimately and converting to 3D. That's where I landed with Fusion, because it "felt" right to me.

Fusion wont feel right to everyone. Find your match and get crackin
 

Jack3M

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...
For simple things, Fusion is easy to use, but, like all CAD systems, proficiency requires experience. The numerous tutorials available help a lot, but I've found that the very best way of learning is to have a specific personal project to do. Its amazing how much you learn when you need to do something specific to your own design.
All CAD programs are complicated beasts and are impossible to use proficiently without devoting weeks or months in learning them. Once the penny has dropped you realise how useful they are.
I agree completely with getting experience to get proficient. As such, am taking a set of drawings and making individual groups of assemblies and parts, plus the model for the casting plug.
 
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I agree completely with getting experience to get proficient. As such, am taking a set of drawings and making individual groups of assemblies and parts, plus the model for the casting plug.
I have a few plans from text books for old steam engines that I converted to cad files. I planned to convert them and then 3d model the moulds and cores and see how much it will cost to have sets cast in cast iron. That's almost my entire reason for getting into 3D. Now however I may just get 3D printed wax models cast and use investment casting techniques and aluminum at home.

That and to cnc router my model boat hulls to make fiberglass hulls from them. so many ways to output from
 

Jack3M

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TB, That is what I am doing. You could also consider brass and even bronze if you want.
 
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TB, That is what I am doing. You could also consider brass and even bronze if you want.
Direct me to cheap unlimited brass and bronze scrap stockpiles and I am all in ;)

I know I can get scrap aluminum for free many places. Big city living has some perks
 

Jack3M

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Direct me to cheap unlimited brass and bronze scrap stockpiles and I am all in ;)

I know I can get scrap aluminum for free many places. Big city living has some perks
Craigslist brass and bronze fittings. BUT I buy both new.
https://www.budgetcastingsupply.com/category-s/1855.htm for bronze,
and for brass this seems to be the best price but haven't bought there yet.
https://www.thebrasswarehouse.com/product/c87850-ingot/?gclid=Cj0KCQiAp7DiBRDdARIsABIMfoAociXt9Ujy_zvpOE_Z0okVVwY3RU1e2wo1gle_PXmT9CloByjUKCkaAogtEALw_wcB
 

n1326e

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There were a few that I had to back up on. No big deal to me. You do realize you can do CAM also with Fusion?
Yes Jack, I knew that but, for some reason, I seem to always look around for new programs :) Also, one thing I neglected to mention about CAMBAM is that it's not free. As of this date, after the trial period, it's about $150 so I've ruled it out since I'm just a hobbyist trying to keep my spending within reason. Tom
 
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