Fusion 360 learning ?s

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n1326e

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I've been using TurboCAD for a number of years and started using F360 about 18 months ago. The difference between the two systems is considerable and initially I used Fusion only for rather simple models destined for 3D printing and switched back to TCAD for complicated drawings. With increased experience I've recently been creating rather complicated assemblies using joints etc. I've now even started to do simple simulations employing finite state analysis, which revealed unexpected weakness in the design of something for the charity for which I do voluntary work. It saved a lot of money in time and materials.
For simple things, Fusion is easy to use, but, like all CAD systems, proficiency requires experience. The numerous tutorials available help a lot, but I've found that the very best way of learning is to have a specific personal project to do. Its amazing how much you learn when you need to do something specific to your own design. Tom
All CAD programs are complicated beasts and are impossible to use proficiently without devoting weeks or months in learning them. Once the penny has dropped you realise how useful they are.
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lemelman, I second your statement ...." I've found that the very best way of learning is to have a specific personal project to do." It sure works wonders for me too.
 
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n1326e

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Here's another tid-bit for those looking for basic CAD software. I started out, and still use, 'TinkerCAD'. For some reason I always revert back to this program when my brain needs a rest from Fusion 360. Tom
 

petep

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Being a newbie to CAD, I have experienced many of the issues mentioned thus far. I agree wholeheartedly with lemelman. I don't seem to have a problem sketching etc but my big problem is understanding the basic the concepts of designing a model with numerous components/bodies & how to assemble them all - in a logical sequence. I have found the following to be very helpful, especially the second site.
http://aucache.autodesk.com/au2016/sessionsFiles/18157/11492/handout_18157_PD18157-Eichmiller-AU2016.pdf
And
https://docs.google.com/document/d/11JxN3XLyVWVTwCPbGEFvPc9nE6kiqCvUTo84CpIIL5s/mobilebasic#h.xqoj4brav9c
Pete
 

BillH

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Yes Jack, I knew that but, for some reason, I seem to always look around for new programs :) Also, one thing I neglected to mention about CAMBAM is that it's not free. As of this date, after the trial period, it's about $150 so I've ruled it out since I'm just a hobbyist trying to keep my spending within reason. Tom
Fusion360 was designed to do one thing, kill Solidworks. Autodesk has done an amazing thing offering Fusion360 for free to hobbyists. I started with Solidworks exactly like everyone else, with a pirated copy. I now get to use Solidworks with my EAA membership, so it is legit, and of course, I use Fusion too. Fusion360 is better, and the built in CAM is professional too. There is literally no reason to use any other CAD software anymore. Bravo to Autodesk, and I say this with absolute hate towards Autocad. Solidworks no longer has any relevance for me.
 

Jack3M

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Bill I happen to know one of the muckey mucks there. Not much in communication, but we have a hobby we have shared in the past. I would like to copy and send him your response. I tried 4 times to understand how to use this software. Once I got it. I tossed the pirated copy of SW. They (the Autocad Family) listen to the customer. They know they would get pirated so they make things this way for those of us having fun and real business that has solid footing pays. That is the way it should be.
 

Naiveambition

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I've been messing with fusion for about a year off and on, and with moderate success. I also had to scrap all the learning lessons from autodesk and just dive in making a model. Just diving in goes against most of my learning intuition, but seems to be the way to learn fusion. I still have a issue with design concepts, but have came to this conclusion, if making a single part, save or finish before components. Multi files of the model work better for me. Once components are made the landscape changes. My take for components are for use in drawing where there is more than one part,need a part to move, or for drawing multi parts from or on previous sketches. Anything but a one peice model will need components. And always fix the problem first, don't say I'll fix it later, this leads to confusion and mostly other problems later, that cause all kinds of weird issues.
Fusion is nice to me for workability, schooling not so much, but a little time messing will do new people wonders. I do wish there was a place to go that offers real world explanations like fusion for dummies, that teach the concept of "WHY"they are doing what they are doing vs these are the buttons you click
 

Jack3M

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Naive... I am telling you watch the 3 vid series of Lars'. He tells you why. It is just the basics to build on. I am a learn best from doing person, but you have to start with the basics. You by your post have missed some important concepts...like body and component.
 

Naiveambition

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In my defense I have watched a boatload of different videos including Lars . With his help I was able to start drawing right away so no fault of his.
Somewhere someone posted its best to find a program that thinks how you view the part. I'm looking for "design intent", not how to model, and the reasons why I need to model this way or that way.
Also many autodesk contributors have stated their is no one way or right way to get things done. The times that's it does matter is having enough understanding of "design intent", to know when to model in correct sequence to get desired results. This seems to be the confusion for most e.g. Components and bodies.
Many of times while modeling you do one wrong move and your drawings go bezerk, . Ok back out and find out why, again "design intent" , not how to get my desired affect , but why did it do that.
Maybe it's just me that's missing it but I also am technically challenged on anything past a calculator. The phone, iPad , computer, smart tv are all past my mechanical thinking. Life seemed easier before I had things "think" for me. ;) I mean I have a hard enough time thinking for me, I don't need something else doing it too:):):)
Im sure like most things experience counts and fusion is no exception, I do believe that about anyone can work thru it and be drawing the first day but the memorization of how and when are gained thru time or as stated above by just doing a personal project to finish. I would like to say I really like the fusion 360 product , and its capabilities are prob. more than I'll ever need and don't want to throw anyone off of trying to learn it, just push thru and it will become clearer.
 

Glorfindel

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The numerical world is not as easy as it look.

Many of the videos out there are lacking basics 3d design rules.
 
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