Bolton No.2 Mill Engine

Discussion in 'A Work In Progress' started by jcreasey, Sep 11, 2019.

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  1. Nov 5, 2019 #21

    Jacob P.

    Jacob P.

    Jacob P.

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    Great progress! Once I get more experience with machining, I’m going to tackle a PM Research No. 5 vertical steam engine build. I have the castings and have been brainstorming how to go about the machining. I’m very much a beginner, and these photos will be useful in guiding me how to go about it. Keep up the good work! Looking forward to seeing the finished product.
     
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  2. Nov 5, 2019 #22

    jcreasey

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    If you are a bit nervous making an engine from castings it's a good idea to try making an engine from bar stock first. Those are great because if you make a mistake you can easily replace any part. There are a lot of wonderful designs by Elmer Verburg for which plans are freely available.

    Good luck with it in any case!
     
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  3. Nov 6, 2019 #23

    bobden72

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    Looking good
     
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  4. Nov 11, 2019 #24

    petep

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    What an amazing build. Thanks for sharing it with us. You make it look so easy - I'm half way through building the Bolton No 7 & have found it more difficult than I originally thought using castings. Your photo's are brilliant too. Maybe you could give us a few tips on how you get such good photos. Thanks again. Cheers Pete
     
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  5. Nov 11, 2019 #25

    jcreasey

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    Thanks Pete!
    I take all of my photos with my iphone. It's a fairly recent one I think about a year old. I think it's important to make sure the lens is clean. I often retake a photo after cleaning some schmutz off of my lens. Also I think it's a good idea to have plenty of light but to avoid a single point source of light that produces hard shadows. Also I like to zoom in a bit so everything is nice and big.

    Good luck with your engine. It's definitely a challenge building from castings! Mine is even trickier because the castings I have are version 1 and the prints are the revised version. I'm finding the differences as I go which is an added challenge.

    Some more photos coming soon as I did a bunch more on the weekend.
     
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  6. Nov 11, 2019 #26

    jcreasey

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    This instalment covers my initial work on making the crankshaft. At the moment it is still a round disk but I am planning to make it a bit more interesting shape in due course. Once again the castings were a bit meagre for this part so I sliced off half an inch of bronze bar I had sitting on the shelf.

    First step was to face it and drill and tap the center. This was supposed to be 1/4 40 but I went down to 3/16 - 40 so that I would have a nice firm boss for the flywheel to but up against.
    IMG_1084.jpg

    I didn't take any photos but the next step was to put a thread on the end of the crankshaft.
    I just single pointed that as I wanted to do everything possible to get things concentric.

    Once that was done I screwed the two parts together and mounted them between centers.
    I didn't bother with a dog as there was enough friction to drive things as I was taking nice light cuts with a very sharp tool.
    This let me clean up the crankshaft part ensuring it was as concentic as possible to the main shaft.

    IMG_1085.jpg

    Turning between centers makes it very easy to flip things over to finish the other side.
    Not much room for a dog here so it was lucky I could get by with just friction.
    Lots of stickout on this tool but it was very sharp and still cut ok.
    I still use the faceplate just to make sure my spindle nose is protected.
    IMG_1087.jpg


    Now that everything is concentric and parallel I detached the shaft again and setup in the mill using some parallels and a little V block so that I could drill and tap the hole for the crank.
    IMG_1088.jpg

    IMG_1090.jpg

    That's about it for the crankshaft disk. Later on I will need to reduce it's thickness and diameter but I am waiting till a few more parts are done so that I can figure out where everything goes. A lot of stuff is coming together around the cross head and it is all quite interdependant.
     
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  7. Nov 13, 2019 #27

    jcreasey

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    Next task was the con-rod. This started out as a little gunmetal casting which I cleaned up in the mill.
    IMG_1091.jpg
    Once I had things nice and flat I drilled the two required holes. The plan called for 3" between centers but I decided to let the casting be my guide and put things in the middle of each end.

    IMG_1093.jpg

    Then I needed to solve the problem of holding this thing in the lathe so I decided as always to do it the most complicated way possible.
    I made up some brass fixtures to clamp each end so that I could hold one end in the chuck and support the other side with the center. I made some pins to fit the holes each end and threaded the other end.
    If you haven't tried a solid tungsten slitting saw I would highly recommend them!
    IMG_1095.jpg

    I just used a screw on the small end. Once everything was aligned and tightened I squirted each end with super glue for good measure.
    IMG_1097.jpg

    Final step was to use my taper turning attachment to machine a nice taper. The part was flipped to do the other side. I used a nice rounded form tool to give me some nice curved shoulders each end.
    IMG_1098.jpg

    And there you have it. The plan called for a 1/16 relief on the side between the two ends. I did that on the back side but it didn't look as nice so I left the outer side unrelieved. When I cleaned up the sides of the big end I just supported it on pins through each end. This gave it a jaunty non parallel look. I'm not sure if I like that too much but I guess it will be ok.
    IMG_1104.jpg

    Thanks for reading and for the great comments. More soon!
     
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  8. Nov 13, 2019 #28

    delalio

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    This is coming along beautifully! Well done!!
     
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  9. Nov 13, 2019 #29

    Larry G.

    Larry G.

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    Thank you for taking the time to post excellent photos and detailed explanations.
    Where some model makers would have been satisfied to touch up the connecting rod with a bit of filing and belt sanding, your "most complicated way possible" approach produced a fine result.

    Your toolmaker mindset is producing an excellent product.
    I look forward to seeing more.

    Larry
     
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  10. Nov 15, 2019 #30

    LorenOtto

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    Thank you for posting your build. You photos are very clear and the extra steps you take to turn a dreary set of castings into a thing of beauty and elegance are extraordinary. I am enjoying watching from afar.
    Loren
     
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  11. Nov 15, 2019 #31

    Emers

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    Enjoying your build I am a new model builder myself ( 1 year) I like to watch every bodies builds keep up the great work.
    Cheers
    John
     
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