AutoCAD LT vs Draftsight vs DoubleCAD XT

Discussion in 'Software and Programming' started by twebb, Feb 28, 2011.

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  1. May 28, 2014 #21

    littlelocos

    littlelocos

    littlelocos

    Littlelocos Model Engrg HMEM Sponsor

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    While TurboCAD is not a subscription software service and doesn't require that you upgrade each year, they don't like it when you skip a year. It looks like you're still in good shape and can upgrade from V19 OR V20 to V21 for $69.99. For that, I'd go for it.

    See: http://www.turbocad.com/TurboCAD/TurboCAD-Windows/Upgrade/Upgrade-Center/TurboCAD-21-Deluxe-Upgrade

    For the Pro/Platinum version I'm running it costs me about $300/year to keep up with the upgrades which seem to come out each Spring. Usually each new version has about 8-10 or more key new features within the software itself -- plus upgrades to the 3D and rendering "engines" that run in the background. These are the same engines that run in the background of some of the higher-dollar packages and what helps the software to stay compatible with the mainstream packages as well.

    For Version 19, I sprung for the printed manual. It's the same manual distributed as PDF with the software, only printed and bound. Both have advantages like PDF being searchable, but there's still nothing like curling up next to a fire with an honest-to-goodness software manual. (geek humor, sorry) :-0

    There is also a link to an online version of the manual as well as YouTube videos, etc. for training. There are also some non-sanctioned sources of help. I could look them up later this week if you'd like.

    Hoping this helps,
    Todd.




     
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  2. May 28, 2014 #22

    VieuxZep

    VieuxZep

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    Hi,
    Does anyone know Bentley's MicroStation ?

    Thanks.

    P.S. : sorry for my poor English ;) (You know that Frenchies are very bad with foreign languages)
     
  3. Jun 1, 2014 #23

    BaronJ

    BaronJ

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    Hi Todd,

    Unfortunately Turbo Cad doesn't run under linux ! Fortunately I don't run Windows anymore. :)
     
  4. Jun 2, 2014 #24

    AnvilJack

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    To my surprise, I have found some 80-odd tutorial videos for using TurboCAD on the TurboCAD DVD. I have used the first 20 of these over the past week, which were mainly about setting up the environment, units, printing, using viewports, etc. But the help I wanted to overcome the first hurdles were right under my nose.

    I have ordered the current update to version 21 of TurboCAD Deluxe.

    I also have DraftSight, but it is nowhere near as comprehensive in 3D as TurboCAD, and my engineering drawing books emphasise the advantages of working in 3D.

    To develop my skills I am using Sketching for Engineering Design Visualization by Duff and Ross 2009 Delmar ISBN - 13: 978-1-435-45362-3; and Engineering Drawing 8th edn Boundy 2012 McGraw-Hill Australia ISBN - 13: 978 - 007101583-7.

    Both books integrate CAD exercises.

    I would be interested to hear how other forum members have developed their CAD skills. (I figure it will take me months to be useful, and years to be skilled.) Thanks.
     
  5. Jun 2, 2014 #25

    BaronJ

    BaronJ

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    It doesn't take long to become familiar with any drafting program. I was taught technical drawing at school using a pencil, T square and a drawing board. Going from that to a drafting board was thought a big step up in ease of use at the time.

    I became involved in the development of "Turbo Cad" in the early days ! Being able to do drawings on an 8086 based computer was another revelation. Then came along "Parametrics" The ability to create a model and then use that model scaled to whatever size in what ever direction you wanted.

    A lot of engineering drafting is being able to visualise what you want and then construct the 2D or 3D representation. I tend to figure out what I want before I draw it up. I understand that "Turbo Cad" is good at 3D. Draftsight does leave something to be desired but then they do have to get people to buy the software.
     
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  6. Jun 6, 2014 #26

    AnvilJack

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    I must agree with BaronJ: with a little continual practise, some freehand pencil sketches where the ideas are basically firmed up, and about ten hours of video watching (and monkey see, monkey do, again and again), I have become somewhat confident to prepare very basic shop drawings in TurboCAD.


    Then I looked across at some other software: DoubleCAD XT, and Draftsight. I was surprised how quickly I could make sense of what to do.

    Now, a couple of weeks on CAD doesn't make me any more than an overconfident upstart, but I do feel "under way". I have met a handful of people who are bewildered souls, with the same few weeks of exposure to CAD.

    It is a matter of 1) having the drawing concepts in any media, and 2) learn everything you can for a ramp-up start to the software of your choice. Read a little, draw things. Go again.

    All of my serious learning and efforts have been in TurboCAD Deluxe, and, so far, I am enjoying using it. Well thought out program, in my view.
     
  7. Jun 6, 2014 #27

    kvom

    kvom

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    I've been using Draftsight for a few years now for all my 2.5D CNC work. So far 99.9% of the parts I've made have been done this way.

    I recently acquired a copy of Cubify Design, a parametric 3D design program. I have been drawing the parts for my latest project (Joy Valve Engine) using this software, even though none of the parts require 3D machining. I have some extra steps needed to obtain the DXF files, and the drawing takes a bit longer, but there are advantages in being able to examine the part to be made in 3D. And it allows me to view cross sections for complex parts to ensure that I transcribed the printed plans correctly.
     
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  8. Jun 6, 2014 #28

    BaronJ

    BaronJ

    BaronJ

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    Yes ! Once the pennies start to drop its surprising how quickly you become familiar with how things need to be done and put together.

    One of the things that you will find, particularly if you are poor at maths, like me, is using the cad program as a visual calculator. For instance if you have a lever from a fixed point with a pivot some distance away moving in a linear manner, how big to make the slot so it doesn't bind.

    example.jpg

    Just a quick hand drawn sketch. The slot length will change depending on how far the constrained bar has to move.

    HTH.
     
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  9. Jun 10, 2014 #29

    AnvilJack

    AnvilJack

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    My TurboCAD User Guide, over 1300 A4 size pages, arrived today. Almost a phone book.

    I've spent a while looking through some of the sections. My first reaction is that this book will make further progress with TurboCAD so much easier.

    I understand that supplying software with such a large printed manual is much more expensive than simply supplying the same program via download or via a DVD, but surely the increase in user friendliness and so user base would make it all just good business sense.

    That said, this manual is a further reason to warmly recommend that people seriously consider TurboCAD for developing their plans and models for shop work.
     

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