A different twist on aluminum ingots

Discussion in 'Home Foundry & Casting Projects' started by old redneck, Jan 19, 2014.

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  1. Jan 19, 2014 #1

    old redneck

    old redneck

    old redneck

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    I’m very much a novice, having barely stuck my toe into the pool of foundry work. With that in mind, this idea may hardly be new. While waiting for my local feed manufacturer to get me some bentonite, I have been casting ingots in my muffin pans that have held tons of lead for bullets in the past. I looked in my scrap pile and had an idea that at least part of my ingots can be cast into other forms that might be more useful while still fitting into the crucible.
    I bored a piece of round stock that will cast a shape easily made into a v-belt pulley or an adjustment knob (who hasn’t broken one of them?) and a piece of square tubing will cast a piece useful for many projects. I cut a piece off the rectangular casting to build an indicator holder/carriage stop.
    The aluminum will fall out of a smooth steel mold when it cools. I see many other possibilities in the scrap bin. This whole casting thing may consume more of my precious time and resources than I already waste on my metal work hobbies. Oh well, my grown kids are probably not expecting much inheritance anyhow.
    The indicator holder has some rough machining in places, I was cutting pretty heavy and hand feeding. I never get that when I use the auto feed, but it is pretty slow.

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    Walltoddj likes this.
  2. Jan 21, 2014 #2

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

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    It is generally not a good idea to stick your toe in the pool at the foundry. It is a little hot. 😄😄😀😁😁😁😁

    Sorry sad humor from my die casting days.
    Hey what would the world do with out knobs and pulleys. You have the right idea though, having precast shapes can get you through those winter projects when the snow is too deep for casting.
    Enjoy life leave them your castings and machines. I haven't done any casting myself since leaving the foundry many years ago. Just too many projects that keep end up left hanging.

    The various alloys vary a lot when it comes to machinability. Often we don't really know what the alloy is either. When all else fails post processing to smooth everything out may be needed.
     

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