Stuart Compound Twin Build -

Discussion in 'Engines From Castings' started by jpdenver, Jul 1, 2019.

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  1. Sep 7, 2019 #21

    jpdenver

    jpdenver

    jpdenver

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    So now just working with the Sol Plate, I got it where I wanted it and continued to drill the tap holes.

    DSC00289.JPG


    While I was at it I also prepared the bearing bolt holes.
    And the Sol Plate mounting holes for if/when I find it a home.

    DSC00290.JPG


    Of course I have to tap.

    DSC00291.JPG

    Paused for a moment to see how things were lining up ---

    DSC00292.JPG


    Then went back and finished the tapping for the bearing studs.

    DSC00293.JPG


    Another couple of views.


    DSC00294.JPG

    DSC00295.JPG


    And finishing up for today ---
    I found a Base Plate from my D10 build, maybe I'll clean it up and use it for the base -

    DSC00300.JPG


    Thanks for reading -
    All comments welcome.

    Next time --- The Steam Chests


    Regards,
    Jim
     
  2. Sep 8, 2019 #22

    Jayarebee

    Jayarebee

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    So nice to see that those matching holes came out located symmetrically within the sole plate's corners. A perfect job of placing the ten most crucial holes in the engine.

    John
     
  3. Sep 9, 2019 #23

    jpdenver

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    John,

    Thanks for all your guidance on getting this project started.
    Did Dorian come thru your part of the country?

    Working on the steam chests - More to come.

    Jim
     
  4. Sep 11, 2019 #24

    jpdenver

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    STEAM CHESTS

    Started working on the two chests. The casting was very close to finished size.
    So lots of skim cuts. Add to that file work and finish up with my linisher for polish.

    I did the Low Pressure Chest first, then the High Pressure, and then the covers.

    No drilling yet.

    DSC00301.JPG DSC00302.JPG DSC00303.JPG DSC00304.JPG DSC00305.JPG DSC00306.JPG DSC00307.JPG DSC00308.JPG
     
  5. Sep 12, 2019 #25

    jpdenver

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    Finishing up the Steam chests -

    I guess holes come next.
    I plan to drill the covers first and then
    use those to locate the holes in the chests
    and then the block.

    Then I guess it is time to drill for the
    covers too.

    Thanks for reading.
    More to come.

    Jim DSC00309.JPG DSC00310.JPG
     
  6. Sep 13, 2019 #26

    jpdenver

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    Time to Drill.

    Guess I need to drill holes sometime.

    First I drilled the holes in the Steam Chest Covers.

    DSC00311.JPG

    Then I used the cover as a template/jig for the Steam Chests.

    DSC00312.JPG

    Then I used the Steam Chests to locate on the Cylinder Block.

    DSC00313.JPG

    I Then drilled and tapped a couple of holes in order to temporarily mount the Chest.

    DSC00314.JPG

    Using 2 studs to hold the chest in place, I used the "clearance" drill to locate the placement and then drilled for tapping.
    After the holes were drilled, I used and Number 2 Tap followed by a Bottom Tap to prep for the studs.

    I only went in 1/4 of an inch. The drawings do not give a depth.

    Then I added the studs and tested the fit.

    DSC00316.JPG

    And finally the cover.

    DSC00315.JPG

    Tomorrow the High Pressure Set.

    Thanks for reading,

    Jim Pope
    Denver
     
  7. Sep 14, 2019 #27

    jpdenver

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    High Pressure Steam Chest

    Followed the same process.

    First use the Chest as a template.

    DSC00317.JPG

    Use the "Clearance Drill" as a marker. Then tap a couple of holes to hold the chest in place.

    DSC00318.JPG


    Then continue to mark and drill the remaining holes.

    DSC00319.JPG


    All done with the first part of the steam chests,

    DSC00320.JPG

    DSC00321.JPG

    Cylinder Tops and Bottoms next.

    Thanks for reading,
    Jim
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Sep 17, 2019 #28

    Jayarebee

    Jayarebee

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    Hi Jim - Yes, Dorian did roar through here but nothing like down South - the ocean is cooler up here.
    You have done a lot of work on your engine in a relatively short time! You must be quite pleased to see the results - John


     
  9. Sep 22, 2019 #29

    jpdenver

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    Finished up the Steam Chests by drilling and reaming the glands for the slide valve rod.

    DSC00330.JPG DSC00331.JPG
     
  10. Sep 22, 2019 #30

    jpdenver

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    Crosshead Bracket

    This is a Bronze Casting - known as gunmetal in some places.

    It came fairly rough, lots of flashing.

    There are two drawings for the bracket. One for the version without the reversing gears,
    and one showing the addition of the rod from the reversing gear kit.

    There are conflicting measurements.
    The thickness of the bracket is 1/4 inch on the first set of plans,
    and is reduced to 3/8 inch on the set from the reversing gears.

    DSC00335.JPG


    I chose to go with 1/4 inch.

    After cleanup and reducing the thickness of the bracket,
    I needed to drill for the rod.

    So I mounted the bracket in a vise, and attached it to an angle bracket.
    making sure all is level, square, and plumb.

    DSC00332.JPG


    Then I located the starting point on the "top" rod

    DSC00333.JPG DSC00334.JPG

    Then the drilling -

    I used an assortment of drills, starting small and then larger.
    Then I used a long drill to get a pilot hole thru the bottom
    bracket.

    I used a small mirror to watch the progress from below.

    DSC00336.JPG DSC00337.JPG

    DSC00338.JPG

    Then finished with a reamer.

    DSC00339.JPG

    DSC00340.JPG

    Then I used the rod as a mandrel in the 3-jaw and left the other end a little "loose" in the tailstock drill chuck.
    Worked the ends to be symmetrical to the rod.

    DSC00342.JPG
     
  11. Sep 23, 2019 #31

    jpdenver

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    Continuing with the bracket.

    Still needs some polishing, but first
    I worked on the holes for mounting on the legs.

    DSC00343.JPG

    Mounted in the vise.
    Drilled and Reamed to size.


    DSC00344.JPG

    Trial fit on the legs.

    DSC00345.JPG

    Very tight. As it should be.
    Some more views.

    DSC00346.JPG DSC00347.JPG




    Thanks for Reading.

    Jim Pope
     
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  12. Sep 23, 2019 #32

    Jayarebee

    Jayarebee

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    Jim, my plans both show the same dimensions as yours: the 1980 drawing for the non-reversing bracket shows 1/4" thickness while my 1970 diagram for the reversing bracket is 3/16". I made mine 0.213" thick for some reason. Even at that it is a little too thick as I could hardly get the crosshead back washers to clear the bracket when bottoming out (and I used even smaller rectangular washers rather than the ugly(!) round ones suggested).
    A little judicious milling on the top of the bracket just where the slides meet it would solve that problem without needing to make the entire bracket thinner.

    I can't see why it should be different between the plain and reversing engines. However there is a different location specified for the bottom holes on the slide brackets between the Compound and Twin (which I thought were identical in that respect). On the Compound the holes are 1/8" from the bottom of the slide - on the Twin it's 3/32". That extra 1/32" clearance would make a difference to the sliding back washers...

    Nice progress!
    John
     
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  13. Sep 28, 2019 #33

    jpdenver

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    Thanks for all your advice John.

    I am taking a little time off the job to work on my relationship with the new shop steward.


    fullsizeoutput_191.jpeg

    Work will resume in a day or two.

    Thanks for reading,

    Jim Pope
    Denver,CO
     
  14. Oct 2, 2019 #34

    Jayarebee

    Jayarebee

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    Bet your old shop steward has gone back to school - however this one looks pretty capable as well.
    I spent a little time over the last few days putting up webpage about a small marine gas engine model that I built - but all the while still thinking about our compounds!
    - John
     
  15. Oct 7, 2019 #35

    jpdenver

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    Went back to work on the bracket and slides.

    First - located drilled and tapped the holes in the bracket.

    DSC00348.JPG

    DSC00349.JPG

    DSC00350.JPG

    Then started on the slides. First a little layout.

    DSC00351.JPG

    Then I drilled the corners of the slot.

    DSC00352.JPG

    Followed by the use of a rounded 3/16 mill.

    DSC00353.JPG


    Then the countersink.

    DSC00354.JPG

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    And finally in place.

    DSC00357.JPG

    DSC00356.JPG

    The slots still need a little cleanup with a file.

    So what next?
    Pistons ?
    Crankshaft?

    We will just have to see.

    Thanks for reading.

    Jim
     
  16. Oct 7, 2019 #36

    Jayarebee

    Jayarebee

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    Beautiful countersinking Jim. Getting that right is often more difficult than meets the eye and surely it is a sign of good workmanship.
    After the pistons, glands and crossheads are done you will be able to determine how accurately everything lines up and slides. That's the important part. The cranks and connecting rods then should be just a simple fitting job.
    I think that hound dog is keeping you working well! - John
     

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