'New' Machines

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mhh

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:D :D :D three new machines! Brought them home this Saturday!
First three pictures is a small hand operated surface grinder, the main intention is that we'll use it for sharpening various knives for woodchippers. A really nice little 'Svend Jakobsen' grinder with coolant trough the spindle should be perfect for that! :)

Last picture is of a cylindrical grinder, also a 'Svend Jakobsen' This one is in a horrible state (and on top it tipped over in the back of the car and the motor bracket broke off) and we're considering a complete overhaul with new bearings and perhaps even a scraping if that should be necessary. Currently it's pulled apart in the larger pieces but It will have to be pulled completely apart and cleaned, But that is always a great way to spend a few days! :D

The last little beauty is a eeeeeh the only translation we could come up with is 'sikke machine' hehe but we'll try to get some pictures taken tomorrow and you can tell us what it is.

sjp1.jpg


sjp2.jpg


sjp3.jpg


sjr1.jpg
 

mhh

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Pat J said:
MHH-

Nice machines. I have seen a number of machines scrapped due to a cracked frame, but I also saw my dad braze a number of large machines back together that looked hopeless, and they ran for years, and are still running.

I think some of the secrets to brazing cast iron is to open up the crack into a groove, and to wrap the piece in an fireproof blanket before it can cool, so that it cools very slowly, to prevent cracking.

I think another trick it to preheat the piece to prevent stresses and cracking.

Engine block remanufacturing plants also extensively use techinques to repair cracks in cast iron engine blocks. You can also build up cast iron surfaces with a plasma spraying machine.

Pat J
So far as I've heard you actually have to do both things when welding cast iron or it will crack.
But thankfully it won't be necessary to weld it back together. Because the way it broke I can just make a few extra holes in the plate and thread it back together! ;D

But thanks for the info! :)
 

bentprop

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"new"old machines are so nice to play with.I'm still lusting after a surface grinder,but they're to expensive here.
BTW,you have too many caravans,more than 0 is too many :big: :big: :big:
 

mhh

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bentprop said:
"new"old machines are so nice to play with.I'm still lusting after a surface grinder,but they're to expensive here.
BTW,you have too many caravans,more than 0 is too many :big: :big: :big:
The pictures are actually from the guy that sold it to me ;D So I'm caravan free! ;D I prefer an indoor bed anytime!
 

mhh

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Finally some more pictures!
First five is of the cylindrical grinder, next the surface grinder and last the eeeeeh 'sikke machine' I really don't know what it's called in english! so any suggestions are welcome! ;D

























 

shred

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mhh said:
Finally some more pictures!
First five is of the cylindrical grinder, next the surface grinder and last the eeeeeh 'sikke machine' I really don't know what it's called in english! so any suggestions are welcome! ;D
Maybe a bead-roller for putting neat edges on metal sheet? What do the round parts that go on the shafts look like?
 

njl

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Yep I think your right Shred, I saw the exact same machine on "American Hot Rod" last night on the Quest TV channel.

Nick
 

arnoldb

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Nice score MHH.

Shred and Nick are pretty much right; I don't know the true name of the roller in your last picture, but it is used to roll edges onto sheet metal - not just cosmetic, but also for edging to form lap joints or angled corners, and even for forming strengthening V's and so on.

In your photo of it, on the wooden base, there are two rollers and two nuts visible; The rollers are used as a pair to roll 90 degree angled edges on sheet metal, and the nuts retain them on the shafts.

I wish I could get my grubby paws on that one - it is a valuable tool for doing sheet metal work, and I actually have a home-brew build of one on my tuit list.

Regards, Arnold
 

d.bick

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In the U.K. we call it a hand-powered swager or hand-powered jenny (you can get them motorized). They fetch a fair bit of money on flebay.
As pointed out you can put a bead along the edge of metal or some tools allow the edge to be turned over to make a small flange.
I use one at work (see photo)
Some great tools
Dave Bick


DSC00908.JPG
 

mhh

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Thanks for all the replies regarding the beadroller or swager! :D I already knew what it is used for and have used it already :D But it is always nice to know what it is called in english! Thanks again!
 

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