My first engine, a PM research #5

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Nikhil Bhale

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PS, can you show me the compressor design?
I have downloaded this from some website.
Its from some old DIY book. I don't think I am allowed to post material here that may be copyrighted or generally downloaded from some dubious sites.
Its very simple reciprocating design with ball valve for delivery side and inlet valve on piston itself.

I have an ex-fridge compressor I have been using since the 1970s.
That's a good idea. I would try and find some fridge or AC compressor.

Rgrds
Nikhil
 

Richard Hed

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My home town does not have many industrial manufacturing units or big workshops. We have some lathe shops that cater to mostly automobile repairs. We have two shops that sell all the common cutting tools required by machinists. There I can get a 8mm countersink for about USD 2. So countersink must be fairly common to buy in industrial cities.
But you will be surprised to know that neither the shop or the workshops have heard about carbide insert tooling. All they use is HSS tools.
If I need something I usually order it from Mumbai (Bombay) where everything is available.
Indian manufactured tools are more costly then Chinese imports.
I always feel that Indian tool manufacturers lack the business acumen for online trading as online shopping for tools is very difficult.
There are some websites but they are B2B and you have to order for a minimum quantity which is expensive for hobby purpose. The reason for this may be that DIY culture in India is non existent.

Rgrds
Nikhil
Ah, I see! Well even here in the US, carbide is often too expensive for me to buy even tho' I get it when I can. I suppose the price of carbide is too high for even the average shop that does automobile repair. I imagine India is somewhat like the Philippines which I have extensive knowledge, where the average shop is very small with very few tools. However, the people of the Phils. are very clever and ingenious in what they can do with very few tools. I have also watched some vids of Indians doing extremely cleveer things with junk materials. Things so clever that I want to do what they have made. If the vids are anything like typical Indian culture, then indeed, India has a DIY culture. HOwever, these Vids, may be from non-typical people.

WEll usually, one only needs HSS anyway. Carbide is rarely something anyone actually needs for a cut, but when that is needed, HSS will simply not cut it so carbide is the solution. In the Philippines I live in a small place that the local community is about 40,000 people, where in the US I live in a town with about 25,000 people. The size is comparable, as in the way the two places count people is different. In the Phils, they count the people in the countryside who will do their shopping and selling in the town center, but in the US, the count is ONLY the town itselft and not the country side that will do their shopping in the town. so the two places are actually about the same size. In US, there will be 5-6 shops that sell to automobile parts, 5-6 that sell hardware parts and 2-3 that will sell industrial parts. These places are huge compared to the shops in the Phils.

The Phils will have 2-4 shops that sell exclusively to motorcycles, and 1-3 tiny shops that repair motorcycles and cars. If you want something that is even the least bit unusual, you have to go to the big city (Cebu or Dumagete on another island) or order it from one of these shops. Machine tools would NOT be in one of these shops, they would be in the city. ANyway, as an example of how awful these hardware stores are, in the US, one would ALWAYS find welding supplies that are quite extensive with several sizes of welding rod from 1/16" to 3/16" and many types for many alloys and metals. But in the Phils, one finds only 1/8" rod! Even the best welder is going to have trouble welding thin materials with this stuff. It's like trying to kill a mosquito with a cricket bat! I tried to get people to understand how smaller rod works better for small material but they simply can't get that idea. I have to order 3/32" specially for the work I do. One can lower the amps (heat) significantly on use of smaller rod.

I suspect that in India, the manufactories are generally small, and suffer from a lack ability to use their machines all week , all day (24/7) which would help simply by using their materials/space/time costs to the maximum. Can you enlighten me on one question? Does India have a culture with imaginative, inventive people?

PS, the book design depends how old it is that you can post. HOwever, you CAN post the name of the book or magazine.
 

Nikhil Bhale

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Does India have a culture with imaginative, inventive people?
Yes definitely. There is even a word to describe it. JUGAAD. This word even made an entry into the Oxford dictionary.

In India most of the shops are privately owned and not some big chain franchisee. So the shops only stock hot selling items. No owner will cut his margins by stocking on items that may sell once or twice in a year.

PS, the book design depends how old it is that you can post. HOwever, you CAN post the name of the book or magazine.
I will post the PDF here. If admins are not happy they can remove it please. And sorry for the mistake.
 

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Richard Hed

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Yes definitely. There is even a word to describe it. JUGAAD. This word even made an entry into the Oxford dictionary.

In India most of the shops are privately owned and not some big chain franchisee. So the shops only stock hot selling items. No owner will cut his margins by stocking on items that may sell once or twice in a year.


I will post the PDF here. If admins are not happy they can remove it please. And sorry for the mistake.
I like that, JUGAAD, How do you pronounce that? Is the PDF a book or a magazine? Can you tell me the name? All I saw was "Workshop hints". Is that a book or mag?

Once I was getting Indian recipes for chicken and found this word: "murg" and didn't know how it was pronounced. I went to work for an Indian in USA who had an apple orchard and I was asking him about "murg'. Of course, he had no idea what I was talking about till I said "chicken" then he pronounced it more like "moorkh". Well how is one to learn if we use phonemes that are only in English for phonemes in other languages? LOL
 

Nikhil Bhale

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Well murg and moorkh are totally different. Murg is chicken and Moorkh is a fool/ dimwit. So I dont know but did you here it properly?

I dont know about the book. Its only copy that (I have 2pages from it), As I saud I would like to copy the design concept of that compressor and make it with what I have.

Rgrds
Nikhil
 

Richard Hed

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Well murg and moorkh are totally different. Murg is chicken and Moorkh is a fool/ dimwit. So I dont know but did you here it properly?

I dont know about the book. Its only copy that (I have 2pages from it), As I saud I would like to copy the design concept of that compressor and make it with what I have.

Rgrds
Nikhil
Well it's the fact that different languages use different phonemes. I was in China for six months and could not get some phoneme that was pronounced with tongue at back of upper teeth and was like an "szts" . Couldn't get it, tho' I had a good teacher to learn from. I was pronouncing murg like in English, but that is not how it is actually pronounced. "moorkh" is my English approximation to how my Indian friend pronounced it. He rolled the r too.
 

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