Lubrication for open geared Metal Lathes

Discussion in 'Machine Modifications' started by JimDobson, Jun 13, 2019.

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  1. Jun 13, 2019 #1

    JimDobson

    JimDobson

    JimDobson

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    I know everyone has there favourite product, but CRC TAC-2 for me is just absolutely brilliant and lasts and lasts.

    Really quietens down the gear noise.

     
  2. Jun 13, 2019 #2

    Cogsy

    Cogsy

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    TAC-2 is a good product for open gears or chains, any of the decent motorcycle chain lubes work fairly well also. You've reminded me that I need to spray a bit of lube around next visit to the shed.
     
  3. Jun 13, 2019 #3

    JimDobson

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    How often do you pump oil in those ball bearing nipples (if you have them in your lathe) Al ?
     
  4. Jun 13, 2019 #4

    Cogsy

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    That's a tough question. Probably not as often as I should, but more like when I notice the visible surfaces are looking a little dry. I know when I do give them a squirt everything seems to run smoother and easier so definitely too long between lubes. At different times of the year I can go months without getting out to the shed at all so I don't have a set schedule like I should.
     
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  5. Jun 13, 2019 #5

    deeferdog

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    Because I'm near the ocean and rust is constant reminder of its proximity, I spray all my machines with a mixture of kerosene and engine oil. The stuff works its way into every nook and cranny and keeps everything lubricated. I do this on a very regular basis.
     
  6. Jun 14, 2019 #6

    JimDobson

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    Thanks AL.
     
  7. Jun 14, 2019 #7

    JimDobson

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    I live right next to the ocean as well. I have never tried kero and engine oil but will give that a try on some items that I have outside under a lean to that I always have a problem keeping rust away from.
     
  8. Jun 14, 2019 #8

    DJP

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    Kerosene and Automatic Transmission Fluid is my home brew lube for cleaning and rust protection.
     
  9. Jun 14, 2019 #9

    XD351

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    I use lanotec and i can attest that it works well , when you uncover your lathe and it looks like it has just had a shower but not a speck of rust on it you know you are onto a good thing ! Only donside is if left on long enough it goes waxy and is a bit harder to get off but some cheap spray degreaser gets it off relatively easily.( i buy in bulk from supacheap or repco when on special ) .
     
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  10. Jun 14, 2019 #10

    fcheslop

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    For open gears I tend to use motorcycle chain lube or what evers to hand working on the principal any oil is better than none
    For general rust proofing Tooling spray does a good job for long term protection Outside Storage Protection Spray works well but a swine to get back off
    https://www.moleroda.com/product/mould-protection-spray/
     
  11. Jun 15, 2019 #11

    JimDobson

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    Thanks for the link, I have some outside tools in a lean to (and I'm right on the ocean) that that spray would be excellent for.
     
  12. Jun 15, 2019 #12

    Cogsy

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    Jim - the Lanotec product that XD351 uses should also be a good choice for rust-proofing stored tools and is not overly difficult to remove as far as I know. It's a lanolin based product so it's not only good on your machines but on your hands as well (lanolin is the oily stuff sheep make and keep shearers hands in good condition).
     
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  13. Jun 15, 2019 #13

    JimDobson

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    Al I have a couple of litres of Lanotec antifoul left over (I don't use it on my boat anymore) I might give that a try on some of my outdoor tools and machinery.
     
  14. Jun 16, 2019 #14

    clockworkcheval

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    Motor cycle chain lube sounds like an effective option; thanks. Part of my machines, mostly the woodworking variety, live in the back of an open shed. I fight the rust with wool grease. Apparently Australian sheep farmers noticed that steel posts do not rust where sheep use them as rubbing posts. It works! It comes over here as rather solid grease, so I mix it 50/50 with light oil for easier application.
     
  15. Jun 18, 2019 #15

    lennardhme

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    My anti rust solution is to cover my machinery with a woolen blanket [cheap from an op shop] . I spray the inside with Lanotec, one of my favorite products, & that seems to emit a "mist"that coats everything & keeps it in top nick. I live in a wet mountainous area & find this is a great solution.
    cheers
    Lennard.
     
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  16. Jun 18, 2019 #16

    clockworkcheval

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    Ah, I checked. Same stuff. Lanotec is based on wool grease.
     
  17. Jun 18, 2019 #17

    JimDobson

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    Its great for cracked hands and heels as well :)
     
  18. Jun 19, 2019 #18

    DJP

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    I skip the medical benefits and use LOCTITE Maxi-coat when I need corrosion protection on automobiles. It's similar to the factory coating used on BMW cars.

    Our vehicles sit outdoors in all weather so I look for proven commercial products first.

    Just a suggestion for your consideration.
     
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  19. Jun 19, 2019 #19

    DJP

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    I forgot to mention Cosmoline which is the military version of protection for metal. It's hard to remove after 50 years of storage so maybe not the best for machines that need to run when power is applied. Cosmoline is available in commercial quantities but I prefer modern sprays like Maxi-coat for ease of use.
     
  20. Jun 22, 2019 #20

    ignator

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    I've been using a product STP, which is an oil additive. It has the viscosity of honey. But I can't say it works as good as the OP's CRC TAC-2. It does do the same webbing behavior while operating. But when the machine is off, it drips down to a catch paper towel.
    So in search of a better solution, I found gear lube specific to open gear lubrication. I ended up purchasing JET-LUBE OG-H. This contains Molybdenum disulfide. This additive is a must for any use in my autos. The tests of with and without always show a major decrease in operating temperatures of gear reduction uses (from the sales pitches I've seen).

    So my first install of this grease, it does not drip off like oil. I will have to wait and see if it stays in place, and keeps the gear noise reduced. The gear noise is what I always used to indicate putting a few more drops of STP on them.

    As for machine rust, 35 years ago, I moved from a city close to the Canadian border (just south of Manitoba) it was dry there. My new machine shop was enclosed but not sealed from humidity (an add on to a detached garage, it had a sliding barn door). I kept coming home from work with surface rust on my lathe ways. I was using a bed sheet as a dust cover. This I later found, to slow the warming of the lathe during the heat and humidity rise of the summers here in Iowa, so the lathe stayed below dew point which caused this surface rust. A 40watt light bulb fixed this until I built a tightly sealed shop, which I run a window A/C to control humidity. I never see rust on my machines now.
     
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