Easy gasket making - with a 3D printer

Discussion in '3-D Printers' started by Cogsy, Dec 31, 2017.

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  1. Dec 31, 2017 #1

    Cogsy

    Cogsy

    Cogsy

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    I copied this idea from a post by Michael-au in his Peewee V4 thread and decided to give it a go. Very pleased with the results and it's super easy (if you have access to a 3D printer).

    First up, I modelled the underside of my cylinder head in a free online CAD program, then printed 2 copies.

    IMG_2105.jpg

    Then I punched a 1/8" hole in a piece of 0.3mm Teflon sheet (cheap off ebay) and bolted it between the 2 printed templates. The second hole was punched once the Teflon was between the templates so it would be in the right spot. You can see another set of templates for the other head in the background.

    IMG_2106.jpg

    Then it was a simple matter of trimming the edges, cutting the big holes and punching the small ones. For the 'punch' I used a piece of appropriately sized rod, drilled a hole into the end to leave a very thin wall, then gave it a gentle file to sharpen the edge a bit. It worked ok but tended to leave the holes a little ragged as they were punched unsupported. Next time I'll reduced the diameter of the very end of the punch so it accurately locates the hole but leaves it undersize, then enlarge it after removing from the template. Or I guess I could make the 'bottom' template with just shallow depressions instead of through holes for all but the two holes to bolt them together. That would give support but would mean modelling 2 different pieces per gasket. I guess I could even have used a drill instead of the punch which may have worked (although the wife frowns at power tool use inside the house and I made my gaskets on my coffee table in the lounge where my 3D printer currently lives).

    IMG_2107.jpg

    Here is the roughly finished gasket.

    IMG_2108.jpg

    And finally with it sitting against the head it suits. Not bad for a first attempt and will definitely do the job.

    IMG_2119.jpg

    I recommend it as an option to consider for gasket making, especially for the small, difficult to cut gaskets like those for carbies, manifolds, etc.
     
  2. Jan 1, 2018 #2

    michael-au

    michael-au

    michael-au

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    Looks good Cogsy. much easier to make gaskets :)
     
    Cogsy and H. K. Barrows like this.
  3. May 17, 2018 #3

    peter2uat

    peter2uat

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    See, it's quite easy to make parts by 3D printing. The more complex things take a lot of thinking and tinkering. I'm on my way building a small "garden-sized" railway locomotive. The rails for a 300cm dia circle as well as a 120cm circle, a few straights and 2 manually operated turnouts as well as a few pieces of running stock (small diesel loco and 4 different wagons - just for pushing around - no powered loco at this time) I have finished already, so now it is on to a battery powered steam loco. A slow build, but coming along quite nicely. The body is more or less finished (apart from painting it matt black and putting in some aluminum foil for the lamps). Now on to the drive train...

    002.jpg
     
  4. May 28, 2018 #4

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

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    Nice idea!

    While this is something I've done at work and not on a model engine, I've made quick gasket punches with a center drill to produce the sharp edge. Even soft steel can be good enough in a pinch. You use either the right OD rod or turn a piece to the proper size and then run a center drill in until sharp. This doesn't solve the large OD holes as the center drills only take you so far but that sharp edge sure beats trying to punch with a blunt surface.
     
  5. May 28, 2018 #5

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

    Wizard69

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    Peter

    Nice work on that 3d print. Something like that just begs for questions so?

    1. Is the printer a home built or commercial unit?
    2. How long did it take to print?
    3. Is it one piece or a glue up of several prints?
    4. How long for the CAD/CAM work?

    I ask because i have this long term goal to build a live steam engine but before i get to the point where i can even start on such a project id like to cut my teeth on rolling stock and simpler things.

     

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