American LaFrance Steam Fire Pumper

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a41capt

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Larry, your work is beyond spectacular! 11 years of building on a piece of machinery and all of it beautiful. As a retired 42 year firefighter that spent most of those years fighting fire off of American LaFrance engines, your steamer has found a place in my heart. The Phoenix (Arizona) Fire Department, where I was a firefighter, had two steamers back in the day. One was a two horse rig and the other a full on three horse rig and lovingly cared for through their lives. Unfortunately, when World War Two came along, they were surrendered to the scrap drive and all that’s left are pictures…

John W
 

jkarol

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Larry, I just came across this thread it. What great craftsmanship! I have always wanted to build this model but now Coles Power Models is out of business. Do you still have the drawing set, bill of materials, etc. Would you be willing to sell them or a copy of the drawings?
Regards, Jim Karol
 

steamin

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Larry, I just came across this thread it. What great craftsmanship! I have always wanted to build this model but now Coles Power Models is out of business. Do you still have the drawing set, bill of materials, etc. Would you be willing to sell them or a copy of the drawings?
Regards, Jim Karol
Yes, I will be glad to help out anyway I can. Shall I get a cost estimate of all the paperwork for you ??
 

steamin

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Larry, your work is beyond spectacular! 11 years of building on a piece of machinery and all of it beautiful. As a retired 42 year firefighter that spent most of those years fighting fire off of American LaFrance engines, your steamer has found a place in my heart. The Phoenix (Arizona) Fire Department, where I was a firefighter, had two steamers back in the day. One was a two horse rig and the other a full on three horse rig and lovingly cared for through their lives. Unfortunately, when World War Two came along, they were surrendered to the scrap drive and all that’s left are pictures…

John W
Sir John, you are very kind with your words. When I read your post I got chills running up and down my back. Being able to share the talents my Lord has blessed me with is what my model making is all about. Then to help bring back fond and very special memories for someone through my creativity makes it extra special for me. Again, thank you for your kind comments and God Bless,
Larry
 

steamin

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Sir John, you are very kind with your words. When I read your post I got chills running up and down my back. Being able to share the talents my Lord has blessed me with is what my model making is all about. Then to help bring back fond and very special memories for someone through my creativity makes it extra special for me. Again, thank you for your kind comments and God Bless,
Larry
Question: the hose that the firemen used to fight the fire, how was it transported ??
 

Aussie

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Gentlemen;

As a Retired Career Firefighter, from the Antipodes (a.k.a. Australia,) We tend to do things a bit differently, down here.

However, in my retirement, as an Archivist / Researcher, for the Fire Services Museum of Victoria, I can offer the following:

1./ The hose was carried on a seperate Hose Wagon, or Reel.

2./ Depending on the era, the hose being used would have been stitched and riveted leather, later replaced by woven canvas.

3./ The steamers, due to weight, were horse drawn, by between one, and three horses, depending on size. The three horse hitch was largely a North American practice, most other places using the two horse hitch.

4./ The hose wagons / reels were drawn by one, or two horses. Although smaller reels were located in out stations, and manually drawn to fires, as required.

One of these days, when I catch up to all my other projects, I might get back in to my shed, and complete my Shane Mason Steamer model.

Respectfully

Ian Munro A.F.S.M., M.I.Fire.E.
Senior Station Officer - Retired.
Metropolitan Fire Brigade
Melbourne.
 

Bob Wild

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Great. First you show me how to make the wheels and now the hose fittings. I’m still puzzled as to how to make the hoses. From the photos I’ve seen on the Fire King there is a hose permanently connected to the pump which runs down the side of the engine and round the front.
Bob
 

a41capt

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Gentlemen;

As a Retired Career Firefighter, from the Antipodes (a.k.a. Australia,) We tend to do things a bit differently, down here.

However, in my retirement, as an Archivist / Researcher, for the Fire Services Museum of Victoria, I can offer the following:

1./ The hose was carried on a seperate Hose Wagon, or Reel.

2./ Depending on the era, the hose being used would have been stitched and riveted leather, later replaced by woven canvas.

3./ The steamers, due to weight, were horse drawn, by between one, and three horses, depending on size. The three horse hitch was largely a North American practice, most other places using the two horse hitch.

4./ The hose wagons / reels were drawn by one, or two horses. Although smaller reels were located in out stations, and manually drawn to fires, as required.

One of these days, when I catch up to all my other projects, I might get back in to my shed, and complete my Shane Mason Steamer model.

Respectfully

Ian Munro A.F.S.M., M.I.Fire.E.
Senior Station Officer - Retired.
Metropolitan Fire Brigade
Melbourne.
Ian,

First and foremost, hello Brother from a 42 year retired firefighter!

Here in the states, they still use hand-drawn hose carts for competition. The “Muster” is a series of competitions consisting of hose cart race, bucket brigade, “make and break” (lay out the hose, charge the line, knock down an object with the hose stream, and break the couplings), ground ladder raise, and many many more events. These events are very competitive because, as you well know, firefighters would rather take a beating than lose at anything, so lots of injuries of course!!!

These gatherings are also where departments roll out their antique apparatus to show off, sometimes a steamer will show up, and the operating ones always draw a huge crowd.

Do you folks do anything similar?

John W
 

LorenOtto

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Ian,

First and foremost, hello Brother from a 42 year retired firefighter!

Here in the states, they still use hand-drawn hose carts for competition. The “Muster” is a series of competitions consisting of hose cart race, bucket brigade, “make and break” (lay out the hose, charge the line, knock down an object with the hose stream, and break the couplings), ground ladder raise, and many many more events. These events are very competitive because, as you well know, firefighters would rather take a beating than lose at anything, so lots of injuries of course!!!

These gatherings are also where departments roll out their antique apparatus to show off, sometimes a steamer will show up, and the operating ones always draw a huge crowd.

Do you folks do anything similar?

John W
Some years ago my wife's uncle was a fireman with the Long Beach, California Fire Department and he invited us to a "Muster" held at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles. What a hoot! Huge crowd - lots of water on everybody. Thanks for the memories.
 

steamin

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Thank you to all who have shared some great information and stories of past musters. Some time ago a gentleman from New York shared a story how an American LaFrance shot water higher and further than any of the modern day fire fighting equipment on hand. Thank you again for your input. Spent this afternoon and evening finalizing the plumbing of the pump body. Sure glad I keep notes. What I did many years ago sure did not make much sense at first. But my notes and sketches came through for me. The pictures below shows the jungle of pipes and valves. I will make up a sketch sometime that will explain all the valves function and piping runs. Till later, Larry
 

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Aussie

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a41capt & LorenOtto;

Apology, for the delay, I don’t trawl the form every day, then see something, I’ll reply to, but get distracted.

Yes, in Victoria, and some other States, Reel Running is a summer competition. Although, there is a slow move to include motor events, in tandem.

The various Districts run competitions throughout the summer, leading to the State Championships, in March. There are also parallel Junior, and Rural Championships, as well.

The actual events vary from a one day picnic, to a weekend carnival, but rarely a full on “Muster”, of the type you are familiar with. Most of the Championships usually also include a “Torchlight” parade, in the evening of one of the days.

Respectfully

Ian
 

steamin

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Gentlemen;

As a Retired Career Firefighter, from the Antipodes (a.k.a. Australia,) We tend to do things a bit differently, down here.

However, in my retirement, as an Archivist / Researcher, for the Fire Services Museum of Victoria, I can offer the following:

1./ The hose was carried on a seperate Hose Wagon, or Reel.

2./ Depending on the era, the hose being used would have been stitched and riveted leather, later replaced by woven canvas.

3./ The steamers, due to weight, were horse drawn, by between one, and three horses, depending on size. The three horse hitch was largely a North American practice, most other places using the two horse hitch.

4./ The hose wagons / reels were drawn by one, or two horses. Although smaller reels were located in out stations, and manually drawn to fires, as required.

One of these days, when I catch up to all my other projects, I might get back in to my shed, and complete my Shane Mason Steamer model.

Respectfully

Ian Munro A.F.S.M., M.I.Fire.E.
Senior Station Officer - Retired.
Metropolitan Fire Brigade
Melbourne.
a41capt & LorenOtto;

Apology, for the delay, I don’t trawl the form every day, then see something, I’ll reply to, but get distracted.

Yes, in Victoria, and some other States, Reel Running is a summer competition. Although, there is a slow move to include motor events, in tandem.

The various Districts run competitions throughout the summer, leading to the State Championships, in March. There are also parallel Junior, and Rural Championships, as well.

The actual events vary from a one day picnic, to a weekend carnival, but rarely a full on “Muster”, of the type you are familiar with. Most of the Championships usually also include a “Torchlight” parade, in the evening of one of the days.

Respectfully

Ian
Ian, great read. Thank you. Sounds like the gatherings we have here in the states of old tractor and steam traction engines and anything else that is steam related. I looked up the “Stand Mason” steam pumper. What a great looking piece of equipment. Glad to see that it is well documented. I do hope you can get back to your model of it soon. I know it will be awesome. Till later, Larry
 
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