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A little about myself HSM history

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Tin Falcon

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Introducing Tin Falcon
Because this board is brand new I thought I would take this opportunity to introduce myself. I post under the handle of Tin Falcon on this board and a couple of others. Some of you already know me. I have been interested in metal working for many years mostly reading blacksmithing books and a couple of the Gingerly how to build a Lathe etc series. At one point I thought it would be cool to build my own bicycle frame. My experience with machining really started in 1996 when I transferred into the fabrication shop of the N.J. Air National Guard unit at the Atlantic City International Airport. They sent me to school for welding & machining full time for the summer of ’97, and I got paid for it. Yes this is a Home shop machinists dream.
I did not have a home shop until the summer of ’98 I started with a humble Grizzly 7x10 mini lathe and a hand me down drill press and started making pen and pencil sets. Soon I added a band saw and belt sander. I got the little grizzly rather than a pen lathe because I knew I wanted to do metal projects as well. In the early part of 2000 I took a job as an all around craftsman at a model shop. The place made high end models and training equipment for schools and industry. I did welding, machining painting, assembly work etc. It was a fun job and I learned a lot but the owner had no clue how to treat people. The place had a high turnover rate.
In the winter of that year I was hired with the air guard as an aircraft structural mechanic full time. Yeah!! I get to go to another metal working school the following summer. This time the training was for sheet metal work and corrosion control / painting. The fall of that year I was just settling in to life in the new job and with the family after not seeing them most of the summer. Sept 11 the WTC Twin towers were attacked. At about 11 am that day I walk into the shop and my boss says “By the way you have been on active duty since 0600 this morning.” This was actually a real blessing. One in retrospect I should have taken better advantage of. Here I am the ”Maytag Man”, waiting for something to break so I can fix it. I am on the night shift from 8 pm to 8 am with full access to real machine tools sheet metal tools and reasonable amounts of training/scrap cutoffs. I used the opportunity to start machining my PM research 1B casting kit. Unfortunately my supervisor did not seem to like me looking busy while the others were catching up on watching DVDs.
In October of that year I visited the Edison workshop in E. Orange NJ. A great trip if you ever get the chance to go. I also made a side trip to Micro Mark and added a Mini Mill to my collection of tools. I later added a South bend 9” Lathe and an atlas shaper.
I have also spent a year working in a precision specialty machine shop doing precision grinding and operating a CNC lathe. I also worked for most of a year in a friend’s fabrication shop doing structural steel work and welding.
By the summer of 2003 I started exhibiting my small engine collection at the first Iron Fever show. The show was enough of a success that my family and I have not missed an Iron Fever Cabin fever show since. I will be posting more on the engines in the gallery section. The Tin Falcon handle is because I was a tin knocker on the Fighting Falcon.
Regards
Tin


I decided to bump this for the sake of new members please read post # 33 for more explanation.
me
 

tattoomike68

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Its great to have you here, Im glad you found this place. :)
 

rake60

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I like your introduction idea Tin!

I'll add mine.

I've been a machinist since 1978. Started out in a production
shop cutting threads on gas meter couplers. After that I spent 18 years
running vertical boring mills. Now I operate a CNC lathe. It's a long way
from the air collets and manual levers of the old production shop.
An average work week is 50 hours.

I collect and restore antique engines, so initially my home shop was set up
to make parts for those engines. Then one day I decided to try to build a
small running steam engine from scratch. An addiction was born!
As soon as I finish one I'm digging through stacks of plans looking for the
next project.
 

1Kenny

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Hi Tin,

It is nice to meet you.

I think I have seen your pins on another site, they are very pretty.
 

wareagle

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Well, to keep with tradition:

I have been a commercial/industrial electrician for fifteen years. I am now in management, and don't get to do field work very often these days. Over the course of my career, I have worked on several high profile projects, and have experience with just about every facet of the electrical industry. From high voltage distribution systems, controls and automation, fire and security systems, to communications and fiber optic cabling, I have been neck deep in it. I am still learning the trade as it changes every day, and the more I know, the dumber I feel! As a side note, my advise for the electrical stuff is going to be limited. I would feel bad if someone were to get injured or seriously killed while following my advise!

Growing up my father took me under his wing and taught me mechanics and general metalworking when I was growing up. The bar was set high with him, and that pushed me to do things better and better. We built race cars in our garage, and those were some of the best times. In the more recent years, we continued working on hotrods together and in my early adult years, we were continuously trying to out do each other. It was really fun. I started learning precision machining, and he was honing his sheet metal skills. We figured between us we could handle just about anything in front of us. All of that ended in 2003 when he passed away. I have a young son that I intend on passing my knowledge on to, and building small model engines seems like one of the betting things for us to do together (my reason for being here with y'all).

My machining started as a product of September 11. We were working for a large airline when all of that happened, and as a result of the fallout from the airline being grounded, we didn't have anything to do. I started hanging out in the machine shop and one of the machinists started teaching me how to do basic mill and lathe work. Our stuff didn't get rolling for two months, so during that time I had an informal course in the machining trade. The hook was set.

A milling maching (10x50) was found for $500, and the guy I bought it from said it didn't run. After checking the windings in the motor, I bought it and rebuilt the head and cleaned up the ways and bed. The electrics were pretty much toast (no problem there :wink: ), so everything electrically was redone. When I turned it on the first time, I had less than $1,000 invested in it. Since then, I have bought a lathe, and have several acessories for the lathe and mill both.

Here I am today. Reading books, looking at pictures, and participating in boards such as this empowers my learning and knowledge for this hobby/trade. I have come a million miles, but I have a billion to go, so I am still plugging away at learning and making plenty of mistakes along the way. But most importanlty, I am having fun!
 

tattoomike68

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I started in college taking drafting, welding and machine shop shop classes. I did not want to be a machinist but drafting/engineer tech jobs we few and the pay was too poor for me.

I got a job at a foundry machine shop and worked there over 2 years. I got to run some big lathes 60" inch + swing. I was doing manhole rings and covers. half the time I worked for the pattern shop.

Later I worked for a tattoo artist and made good money for a few years, it was a dirty job and there was too many weirdos in that job.

I worked for a screw machine shop as a lathe/mill/screw machine repairman. Thats where I learned how to work on spindles and other parts of machines, they about worked me to death.

Lastly I worked at some job shops that I loved working at, lots of hydraulics and farm repair type work. The job shop was great, torch a bad part off, lathe out a new one, do some milling , weld it back on. Every day was a little bit of everything.

That came to an end in 2002 when I hurt my back for the last time and had surgery and have never been the same. Walking is a chore now.

Now days I tech admin for some web sites and tinker in my garage.
I sure miss working in a shop for a living.I do some small odd jobs when they come around.
Building models is something I can do without breaking my back and gets me back into the shop.

I bought a new smithy midas 1220 for home in 2005 , its been fun to have a lathe/mill at home. my woman and I build wind chimes and do artsy stuff around the place.

My brother owns a machine shop here in town so any machine tool I need to use I can go up there and help myself. I also get most any of the metal I want for free in the remnants and drops. :p
 

Tin Falcon

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Posted by Canyonman
When it came time to re-enlist, I signed back up as a Armorer/Instructor. And again I soaked up all I could find.......I returned to the States and ran a small Range for awhile, then retired.
So you were a "Red Hat"?? That was another one of my part time careers did that for 11 years.
I did my best to write the short version.
Tin
 

rake60

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De Oppresso Libra, Gentlemen. :wink:
 

Tin Falcon

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Rake : The scales are overloaded??????
Tin
Hey guys did not mean divert the direction of the thread. Let's hear about your background and why you are here.We had a good thing going there. lets hear about your talents.
Tin
 

nkalbrr

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Well lets see attended machine tool technology class during my jr/sr years in hs( 81 grad). Have not touched a mill,lathe or any other real metal working tool since. Work as a RN in an Emergency Department. I have scratch built models for my son and for myself (styrene, wood etc). My father in law rekindled my interest when he purchased a Grizzly 3-1 and gave me his old Craftsman 6in lathe( currently undergoing repairs). we have attended N.A.M.E.S. show in Toledo, Portersville Pa (steam engines) and Coldsprings near Brookville Pa (hit and miss engines).I look forward to building again.
 

Canyonman

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Yes Tin,

I was a "Red Hat" I haven't heard that term for a few years! :lol:

Ken
 

JimHs

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Hi all,
I go by either JimH or JimHs on various metalworking sites. I am an electrial engineer by education, but have done software for the past 30 years. Grew up in my dad's machine shop, although not allowed to touch the big tools. About 10 years ago the bug came back and I started outfitting a shop and building stuff. Jut acquired a benchtop CNC mill so am learning CAM and improving my limited CAD skills. I use TurboCAD.
Jim
 

gt2ride

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Jim What kind of CNC mill did you buy. I am thinking of adding one to my shop. I have an old Bridgeport Mill and three lathes.
 

jagwinn

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Location
Bloomington, Illinois USA
Also in response to e-mail received, I will elaborate on the post I made earlier (the last one on page one [if using Avant browser])

I own a lathe, but it is not setup, it is in 5 pieces in the shop, and must wait til the yard work is done before attention can be directed towards that end.
It is a Craftsman 12", and was obtained from a co-worker along with a Delta floor model drill press and some other tools and attachments.

I have never constructed an engine. I am on this site to learn how.

I have made numerous parts as required by my job as a Packaging mechanic of 27 years.
Machines I work on are mostly French (Kalix) and Italian (Marchesini) and that other country {US} Resina.
I troubleshoot production machines in a cleanroom that has 11 lines running phameceutical and cosmetic products.
At the end of and order, the machine is diassembled by me and sent to the sanitizer washroom. When it returns, I re-assemble for the next product. With my share of the lines (5 lines) {as there are 4 mechanics in the room} my shift is very busy indeed.

What I enjoy on this site is the plans. I see many mechanical priciples in the plans that I recognise on the machines I work with. And, I know of some mechanical devices that I think can be adapted to small engines. I look forward to the time that I can devote to develope some of them.

I went to school for AutoCAD since 1993. As that part of the hobby, I like to take the drawings found in old textbooks and put them into AutoCAD. My favorite, and one I want to construct someday, is the Gould fourplex piston water pump, the drawing of which I found in a book titled "Engineering Drawings".

However, everything else aside, I am a student of the Bilble and a child of God.
My wife is Deaf, and is in the Deaf ministry teaching Bible studies to Deaf.

So, Life is Good! I will mostly stay in the background on this forum, I read it everyday, until that time when I have something to contribute.

If any one needs anything of me, my e-mail is

johnagwinn@yahoo.com

I will close with saying that I was on about 4 other sites, and have quit them with the exception of the Chaski site, as I find this site more to my liking in relation to where I am in this hobby.

Keep up the good work, Rick!
May God bless and keep you and your household.

John
 

lane

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I`ll try to introduce my self. I`m Lane after 2 years or trade school I went to work in Oil field machine job shop in spring of 1969. after about 4 years moved on to a tool and die job shop for 7 1/2 years then to a high precision job shop for 6 month . Then I found a home at least for 23 years in a specialty shop building automation machinery and equiptment ran shop for a few years and became supervisor of assembly dept their in 1998 till 2001 when people who bought the business laid every one off.Went back to doing machine work in 2001 General job shop type. Started my home shop in 1975 with a Atlas lathe and a Burk mill I just went from their . Some of you may know me from the HSM site and the NAMES show. I have been a regular their.IF you haven`t seen it check out my web site TWO BUDDIES.
 

namonllor

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Lane,
I went to your page and I must say the Bridgport blew me away. Now that's what I'm talkin' about. If I only knew what you have forgotten........
Ren
 

Canyonman

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Jim,
I doubt anyone here would claim the arrogance to answer to "expert" but we all strive for success and willingly help each other. If we laugh, it is with you, not at you.

Lane,
If I only knew what you have forgotten........
Well Said Ren.

I'm really impressed with the group assembling here. I hope we continue to attract talented, tolerant people.

Ken

It's better to remain silent and be considered a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt.
 

lane

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I will give you a bit of free advice.Dont let some one tell you you cant do something with you machines.Some times not knowing any better You can do the impossible.But on the same don`t be afraid to ask questions. I fully be leave their is not a right or wrong way to do something in the shop Yet some ways may be better.because of reason unsee to operator at the time.Their is nothing better than experience ,but you only gain it by trying different methods. Every day I read on Home Machining Sites well I cant grind my tool right or get the knack of sharping a drill a drill is a little tricky and in 5 minutes I could teach you how but I am not their so you are on your own. But a lathe tool don't matter that much Just keep the part that is not cutting from rubbing and it will work and once you get something to cut don't be afraid to experiment the next time you grind one.
Once in a shop I was working in we had quite a number of apprentice. We had a job set up for them drilling a bunch of small holes in some parts. Trying different people to get the job out the broke drill right and left along with messing up parts. Finely the foreman had a new guy doing the job and I was to keep a an eye on him . He was making good parts and not braking drills so I say ok. At brake time the foreman went around checking out the progress,and called me back their we looked every thing ok but when e saw the drill he was drilling with we did not know what to do. The whole end was broken of But the parts were good holes on size and location .So we decided not to tell the guy he could not do that because he was doing what we wonted SO some times ignoranceis bliss.
 

Cedge

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What a fascinating group we are assembling here. I've read of skill sets among this crowd that are more than a little impressive and maybe even a little intimidating to a novice machinist like myself. I suppose it's only fair that I join in the introductions. My name is Steve and I'm a relatively newly minted hobby machinist.

My past is somewhat checkered, having done a little bit of a lot across my 52 years. Being a less than stellar student in a time when that it got you a free trip to southeast asia. I managed to draw to an inside straight and spend my military time stateside assigned to remote and isolated places few ever heard of. Long range Coastal Radar sites are almost never near anything resembling civilization.

I was an electronics tech on some of the largest radars in the USAF inventory. Since these sites are pretty self contained, I was cross trained as a Paramed and for rough terrain search and rescue, as part of a community outreach program designed to augment local services in the very rural areas where we were stationed. 4 years of 24/7 on call status is about as much fun as I could stand.

When I left the service I went to work in a family run business where I worked as a heavy transportation mechanic, rigger, metal fabricator, electrical troubleshooter and hydraulic repair, foreman, salesman and eventually bought the compnay after the owner was tragically killed. I've been CEO for a number of my own companies over the years, of which the last sold with a non compete agreement that I'm still bound to honor.

I'm retired now and along the way I've self taught myself in computers, advanced digital graphics, photography and now machining metals. I did a stint as a high end web site designer and had some success at it until 9-11 when everyone put their money away. I'm a published author of a book on advanced digital graphics techniques and still dabble a bit in that online community.

I picked up my Micromark 7x14 lathe and its evil sister, the Mini-mill nearly 3 years ago and spent most of that time making modifications and building tools for the pair. I'd been in and out of machine shops for 20 plus years but had never had the chnace to turn the dials on any of the equipment. Part of my past was doing designs and drawings for parts needed by our hydraulics shop and proofing them with the machinists. I got to see how these things were done and it always fascinated me. Three years later, I'm building my first model engine, thanks to the enthusiasm shown on this board.

I'm now sales manager for the Jensen Steam Engine company as well as working to help them design and test potential new products for their unique 75 year old enterprise. I also do factory authorized restorations for their clients who have engines ranging as far back as 1932. You might say I got bitten real hard by the miniature steam engine bug....LOL. I've collected steam engines for about 20 years and the collection can be seen by using the link provided in my signature below.

That's the short version of who Steve is. Add in being the eccentric grandfather to 4 perfect kids and my life has been and still continues to be rather full.

Steve
 

Canyonman

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Welcome Aboard Cedge.

I really want to ask if we can get a discount, besides we've got the Cedge! :)

Sorry, Crude attempt at Humor, you know , we've got the Cedge {Edge} :roll:

But that would be rude and I'm sure you have heard them all; just couldn't resist! :)

You are another valued addition to this fine group. Welcome.

Tin:
When you first brought this idea up I thought "Well, Here's another lame, corny attempt at drawing membership, Booooriiiiing".......... :roll:

BUT!!! I'm man enuff to eat my words! This has become one of my favorite threads on the Board!

Please Pass the Salt! :lol: :oops: :D

Ken
 
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