Zip Wall for Shop Heat Containment?

Discussion in 'The Shop' started by SailplaneDriver, Jan 18, 2020.

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  1. Jan 18, 2020 #1

    SailplaneDriver

    SailplaneDriver

    SailplaneDriver

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    I have a small portion of our unheated three car garage set up as my shop. I live in the Seattle area and we get some cold spells. The garage stays above freezing but it is not plesant working in the 40s F. I have a radiant heater that swivels back and forth which works well enough when it's not too cold. It can't keep up when it's in the 20s outside.

    I was thinking about barriering off the shop portion using a Zip Wall or something similar so I could use a heater and contain the heat in the area I'm working in instead of the whole garage. Zip wall puts up a plastic sheet from floor to ceiling and is primarily intended for dust containment. I was wondering if any of you have experience using it to keep in heat.
     
  2. Jan 18, 2020 #2

    MikeG

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    I've been using one for several years and it works great keeping the heat in the shop and not heating up the rest of the garage.

    MikeG
    Colorado Springs, Colorado
     
  3. Jan 21, 2020 #3

    kwoodhands

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    I built a 8'-0" x 12'-0" enclosure that was removable for a customer. This was a pantry in his garage.
    I screwed 1/4" plywood on each side of 3-1/2" metal studs 2'-0" on center. The studs had fiberglass insulation taped to the studs. The long side has three 4'-0" panels , short side has two 30" panels and a 3-0 door.
    Other sides are outside walls that were insulated and sheet rocked when the house was built.
    Each panel has two angle clips screwed to the top and bottom of each panel. Cats cut in where necessary between joists to anchor the clips. Bottom clips screwed into plastic anchors on the floor. Ceiling was insulated in the room and 1/4" plywood screwed to the joists. Plenty of shelf space on the outside walls. More free standing shelves attached to the studs . He heats the room with an oil filled electric heater when necessary.
    He keeps the pantry 45° when it is very cold outside. I built this 20 years ago ,I don't think he ever removed the panels. His idea was to take the room down in the spring and early summer.
    The zip wall is better than heating the entire garage.
    mike
     
  4. Jan 22, 2020 #4

    SailplaneDriver

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    Warmed up a bit so I'm gonna put this on the shelf until the next snow. Now if I only had in-slab heating to keep my feet from getting so cold.
     
  5. Jan 22, 2020 #5

    Brian Rupnow

    Brian Rupnow

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    My office is at grade level with a cement floor, and I get miserably cold feet in the winter.--I bought a heated rubber mat that plugs into 110 volt wiring and has resistor wires molded into it. I can't remember where I bought it now, but it works great. Probably a web search will let you find a supplier.---Brian
     
  6. Jan 22, 2020 #6

    SailplaneDriver

    SailplaneDriver

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    Brian, that't a great idea. How do you think it would work in a shop environment with metal chip?
     
  7. Jan 22, 2020 #7

    Brian Rupnow

    Brian Rupnow

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  8. Jan 24, 2020 #8

    ignator

    ignator

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    I've been heating part of my workshop for many years now with plastic sheeting. It does keep most of the heat in the space. My shop is 30x40 with 11 foot ceiling. So I installed the plastic wall to make a 30x12 foot space. It's much colder here in Iowa, I use a 3KW radiant heater up at the ceiling. And keep the space around 65F. The electric bill is pretty big for 4 months of the year, as it's on 24/7. I have a 240V base board thermostat to control the heater.
     

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