Whittle Aero V8

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terryd

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Thanks for the additional info Terry, seems the engine was an easy to start motor, just a few flicks, says a lot for the build quality.

Eric's build article and plans were in the UK Model Engineer magazine during 1996.
Hi,

Yes I'm sure they were but originally he had them published in EIM starting in June 1993 onwards, which was his favourite magazine at the time and it was those articles he showed me, I'm unsure as to how ME got the rights as there was a lot of rivalry between the two publishers before EIM was sold to Warners, I was remonstrated with by the then editor of ME when I mentioned an exhibition sponsored by EIM. Eric never mentioned the ME series to me even though we were friends at the time. By the way, the engine was based on the De Havilland Cirrus engine.

Stay safe and healthy,


TerryD
 

mertkan37

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xpylonracer

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Correction to my statement re starting date of the Eric Whittle V8 engine build series in the UK magazine Model Engineer, it commenced 21 April 1995, not 96 as said earlier.
 

terryd

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A bit on the large size compared with Eric's 10.6cc engine.

TerryD
 

mertkan37

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[QUOTE = "terryd, gönderi: 355467, üye: 3769"]
Eric'in 10.6cc motoruyla karşılaştırıldığında büyük boyutta biraz.

TerryD
[/ALINTI]
Benzin mi yoksa nitro mu kullanıyor?
 

xpylonracer

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Eric Whittle's engine runs on methanol and castor or synthetic oil + there is a very small amount of oil in the sump that splash feeds the bottom end. A small amount of nitromethane can be added to the fuel but if doing so it is best to drain the oil from the sump after running and thoroughly flush the engine with lay-up oil to prevent corrosion of steel parts, especially the bearings.
 

mertkan37

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There are two different versions of the engine plan I shared above.
 

methuselah1

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I am embarking on one of these; I've made the cylinders (remarkably with the same grooving tool) from EN16T, the pistons will be next after they have been honed. I got into it, and I made six extra while I was there... For another "one day maybe" project!

My question is this, though- I don't have CNC, and don't want it either; how are items like the timing gear cover machined manually, with the profile of the lugs for where the securing bolts pass?

I don' t often get stuck these days, but I'm stumped by this one!
 

xpylonracer

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Eric did it on a manually operated rotary table, mark out the 2 end radius points and the straight lines at a tangent to the marked rads, the end with the stud lugs will need another radius to the dimension over the lugs, machine to this greater radius first then move the machine axis so the tool cuts to the first radius marked, using 2 table rotation stops to prevent cutting into the lugs, remove the material between the lugs. If you don't want to set each stud centre to table centre for cutting the lug OD you can use a file to remove the small amount of material left.
You will have to set the work radius centre on table centre for each end before moving 1 axis the radius + 1/2 cutter diameter so the cutting edge of the tool is on the scribed line.
Are you in the UK ?
 

methuselah1

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Well, no pain, no gain. I'll only be doing it once, and at least I have the machine for it- a MkII BCA. Thank you for the description, xpylon.

I am in the UK, I'm crippled, so I split my time between lodgings in Hatfield, Herts for work, and my house in Luton, Beds, where my machines are. I can' t drive anymore. All is not lost, however; I work in the University machine shop, and if I catch up with university work, I'm allowed to do my models!
 

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