Two Cylinder Stationary Steam Engine

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Xlmyford

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Hello.

In November I´ve started my new project.It´s a steam engine, based on drawings by Mr.Erich Jenczok.

Since then,I did some of the necessary parts already.
In the forefront,I had some respect, not to say fear of fabricating the main block,drilling all the steam holes.Fortunately,it worked out very well.
To save some money,I used aluminum for the cylinder block and locktited brass liners into it.


The only real disaster I experienced, has been a broken M2 tap, while tapping hole 11 or 12.
Because of that evil beast of tap,which is still laughing at me from the hole,I had to drill some new holes around the right cylinder.To avoid asymmetry, I did the same to the left one.



Some of the parts I made.

A new experience has been excentric turning.

I did it that way.

The first thing I did,was turning a piece of stainless down to 16mm.



On the mill,looking for the center.



2.7 mm out of center,that´s what the drawing said.



center drilled



drilled out to 5mm.Gentlemen,please regard my automatic brush lubrication system ;)



Back to the lathe,finding the center of the excentric hole by two dead centers and a dial indicator.



I took the parting tool to turn the excenter.
and a very moderate feed rate.
Nevertheless,at the beginning it banged hefty.



Low revs.



Voila,the excenter.Looks good to me.



Looking for the "normal" middle again,
to cut the groove.



Parting off



Next part to make will be the crank shaft.


I hope my English is not too bad and that this report is not boring you too much.

Ralph
t.b.c.
 

njl

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Looking good Ralph, thanks for posting.

Your English is absolutely fine and your thread is not the slightest bit boring, it's very interesting to see your set up and how you approach the tasks, so please keep us updated with progress.

I noticed your parting tool, it looks well supported, I've never seen one like that before. I just use a HSS blade type in my Colchester.

Also what does the "ALE" on your DRO display mean. A DRO is on my wish list for the future, one day I'd like to add one to my Bridgeport Mill.

Nick

 

dreeves

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Great looking engine. We all have broken a tap or two or three :big:. The trick is to not throw the part across the room when we do. You came up with an easy fix with minor changes. Most of the time I do the first with a few dents in the wall. Keep the post coming can't wait to see it running

Dave
 

Xlmyford

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Hello Nick.
Thank you for your nice words.

Actually the parting tool is a Glanze grooving tool ,sold by Chronos,UK.



The tool is clamped to a rear tool post,say upside down.
Inverse parting is a great thing,IMHO.
It is less likely that the insert will break,using it this way.




The abbreviation "ALE" stands for Absolute.On my SINO-DRO you can switch the reading
between Absolute and Incremental.The abbreviation for that is "INC".
I can highly recommend the SINO.

Ralph
 

Xlmyford

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Hello,Dave.

I prefer to call me stupid,old idiot or a.....e;something like that,you know.
To be honest,sometimes I blame god for my mishap.I´m pretty sure he understands.
It´s much cheaper that way.

Cheers,Ralph
 

Philjoe5

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Ralph,
Nice work and thanks for sharing it with us.

Using 2 dead centers and a dial indicator to dial in a part on the 4 jaw is a new technique to me and I'll have to try that in the future.

From the views of your cylinder block it appears to me to be an oscillating valve design, is that correct?

Also could you provide a bit more detail about this engine (bore, stroke, availability of plans etc)?

Looking forward to your next progress report

Cheers,
Phil
 

jthulin

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I was thinking that "ALE" was what you rewarded yourself with for a job well done :big:

For this post you deserve an ale Ralph!
 

njl

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Thanks for the tooling info Ralph, I know Chronos and have used them myself on occasions for tooling and metal stock.

Well said Jthulin - I was thinking along similar lines. :)

Nice work Ralph.

Nick
 

Xlmyford

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jthulin said:
I was thinking that "ALE" was what you rewarded yourself with for a job well done :big:

For this post you deserve an ale Ralph!
Interesting association.
I would prefer Guinness,but a good cornish ale is also welcome.But I would never drink beer while working with machinery.
Cheers,Ralph
 

Xlmyford

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Philjoe5 said:
Ralph,
Nice work and thanks for sharing it with us.

Using 2 dead centers and a dial indicator to dial in a part on the 4 jaw is a new technique to me and I'll have to try that in the future.

From the views of your cylinder block it appears to me to be an oscillating valve design, is that correct?

Also could you provide a bit more detail about this engine (bore, stroke, availability of plans etc)?

Looking forward to your next progress report

Cheers,
Phil
Hello,Phil.
To dial in the OD in a 4 jaw chuck,
there are two well made videos on Youtube,one is by mrpete 222,or Tubal Cain from Illinois.This guy is well versed in engineering.
[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npJfKhkS0QE&feature=channel_video_title[/ame]
Another good one:
[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KMhx4DbyDg&feature=related[/ame]

My method,actually it´s not mine,but used by me, is meant to make a part running true around a hole.
Self-evident,you´ll need a hole.You´ll need a dial indicator,two dead centers,or one dead and one live center.That works as well.

Begin with rough setting.

Then dial in by small steps.You got to make sure that the front dead center is turning together with your chuck.Sometimes it gets stuck and you get false readings.
You need two chuck keys to make it quick and simple.


The steam engine will have a bore of 12mm and a stroke of 14mm.

Some years ago,the drawings have been published in a German model engineering magazine or a booklet, now given from hand to hand.
That means in our days, via email by a pdf.file.

The steam control will be done by two round bodys with inner inflow.
Sorry,but I didn´t manage to find the correct English terms for the German words:Rundschiebersteuerung mit innerer Einströmung.
Maybe a drawing can help.


Cheers,Ralph



 

bearcar1

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Hello Ralph, and welcome.

I have to agree with Nick and the rest of the members. I am enjoying your posts tremendously and can understand your train of thought without a problem. The pictures are all well accepted and help to clarify any questions that may arise. Please continue to post up your progress, it is always refreshing to see how others obtain their results. That valve arrangement I have seen referred to as a 'spool' or 'bobbin' valve. I suppose because it looks like one of those things in profile. Thanks for sharing with us.

Ciao :bow:


BC1
Jim
 

arnoldb

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Hi Ralph, and thanks for posting. Some nice progress Thm:

Like Jim noted, what you show is a spool valve, also called a piston valve.
The "innerer Einströmung" part is "inside admission" in English valve terminology.
(not trying to show off; just trying to be helpful :))

Your English is just fine, and you're not at all boring; I'm looking forward to the rest of your build!

Viel Spaß!

Kind regards, Arnold
 

Xlmyford

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Hello.
Thank you all for your kindness.
"Inside admission" and "piston valve",that terms seem to make sense.
Thank you for that.I´m always trying to improve my English.
I would never assume that someone of this community is willing to show off at my cost.

Back to the machine:

Today I started to make the crankshaft.
A piece of brass has been turned down to 22.5mm.
The plan asks for 22mm,I left some material to true the crank,once it will assembled.





Centered and drilled to 5mm.



Cutting in the crank webs.
6.5mm deep, to clear the bolt holes, which will be the next task.
The bar was supported by a live center.



On to the mill,drilling the first hole for a crankpin
The drawing says: 7mm off center.
Don´t forget to countersink the holes a trifle.Looks better.





Back to the Myford for cutting off the first web.



Two times more to go.



The middle web needs two holes, 90° away from each other.
You have to go 7mm in X and 7mm in Y.

Turning the crank pins and the shaft in a collet.This parts are made from stainless.



Back to the mill,adjusting the crank web to 7.5mm by a sel-made spacer.Actually it´s just a piece of FCMS.
You have to assure the distance is kept all-around.

Then I sat the first dowel pin and locktited it in.



My concentration went down and I decided to quit for today.Better then to break a drill.

Unfortunately I´ll have to work this weekend and I´m not sure if I will find some time to go on with the crankshaft.

Cheers,Ralph
t.b.c.
 

Philjoe5

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Thanks for the information and the progress update. I like the piston valve arrangement and at some point I'd like to try building a model with that type of valve.

Your numerous photos are appreciated, especially the way you're building up the crankshaft.

Cheers,
Phil
 

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