New 3D Printer. . . Have no clue what to do.

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stevehuckss396

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So my 2 boys got me a 3D printer for Christmas. Got it built. Turned it on and set the Z height and leveled the pallet. Have not loaded the filament yet. It also has a separate box that the rolls sit in that is heated and has rollers to spin the roll on. It's an Ender 5 Plus. Will print 350 X 350 X 400. I loaded some slicer software that came with it. Loaded some stl files in it and the parts were miniaturized. I assume because I work and save in inches and the slicer works in Millimeters.

Just don't know what to do. Dont know how to run the machine. Never even seen one working in person. Should I watch video's on youtube? How do I learn how to use this thing?
 

dnalot

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Loaded some stl files in it and the parts were miniaturized.

I recently bought my first 3D printer (resin type) and I too found my parts loaded tiny. The slicer probably has a feature for scaling (mine does). I don't now why but at some point the files loaded in the correct scale. The scaling feature is handy for allowing for shrinkage. I watched a lot of you-tube video's and had no problem getting started with prints. It took a few failed prints until I figured out how to determine the correct settings for the type of resin I am using.

I am printing with a castable resin so I can start printing patterns to be investment cast.

Mark T
 

Mike N

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So my 2 boys got me a 3D printer for Christmas. Got it built. Turned it on and set the Z height and leveled the pallet. Have not loaded the filament yet. It also has a separate box that the rolls sit in that is heated and has rollers to spin the roll on. It's an Ender 5 Plus. Will print 350 X 350 X 400. I loaded some slicer software that came with it. Loaded some stl files in it and the parts were miniaturized. I assume because I work and save in inches and the slicer works in Millimeters.

Just don't know what to do. Dont know how to run the machine. Never even seen one working in person. Should I watch video's on youtube? How do I learn how to use this thing?
I create my parts in Fusion 360. I draw my parts in inches I need to save the file in Millimeters. If I forget, I just scale the part times 25.4 it will enlarge the part to the correct size.
 

stevehuckss396

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Thanks Mike I figured that out about 30 minutes ago actually. I printed a couple cookie cutters yesterday. Learned that I had my heat set way too low.

What slicer program do you use. I'm trying to use the software that came with the printer. I setup the heat for the nozzle and table and shortly after the code starts running the table is off and the nozzle temp goes to 190 even tho i set the software to 240. Upsetting!
 

RM-MN

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Look at the gcode the slicer produces. The first few lines define what the temperature should be for the bed and the nozzle.

I use Cura as the slicer but then have Octoprint running the gcode. It allows me to specify a temperature offset if I don't like what Cura puts out or if I want it to run hotter or cooler during the print.
 

MarshSt

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3D printers are good fun but can be frustrating at times. I also use the Cura slicer and have edited the post to add some additional code that helps with troubleshooting/ remembering which settings work. I will chase it down see if I can upload it. FYI: Don't let anyone put the cookie cutter in the dishwasher, it will turn into a pretzel. Been there done that.
 

Michael Rosenbauer

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Hello stevehucks396 I call you Steve that nick is to long;).
1. Your Ender is a good choice witch is usable.
2. All materials have different melting temps and I always make a Tower to see how different temps work at the filaments.
3.It is also necessary to adjust the speed of printing to the material for exampe TPU with 30mm/s PLA 65mm/s
4. Without experience CURA works very good for you, also the g code. With more skills you can go to OCTOprint.
5. You need to align the printing plate to your hot end nozzle. 0,1mm high. Use a feeler gauge for that.
Go to thingyverse at the web an print some nice examples for the first time and see what your printer can do!:)
If you want to design your own stuff Fusion 360 is higly recomendet.
 

Michael Rosenbauer

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Ahhh and yes you tube tutorials for 3D Printing are highly sugested. The guys who testing the new printer stuff and filament from different suppliers gives you a good overview. My " sidewinder x1" has the same printing size and I changed a lot at it due to you tube sugestions.
 

retailer

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I use Fusion360 hobby version - it has a built-in slicer - the process is - design the part - switch from design to additive manufacture - select the printer - output gcode - it is very similar to cnc milling, but probably a bit easier in that you don't have to worry about defining tool paths.
 

awake

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I like PrusaSlicer - which despite the name, is not limited to Prusa printers. For YouTube videos, there are several good choices; I tend to like Thomas Sanlederer, and also Maker's Muse. I believe Tom had a series in the last year or so on how to get started with 3d printing.
 

MMER1116

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I started 3d printing 3 years ago. After testing a number of design software packages, I settled on Fusion 360 hobby version. A great tutorial on YouTube is Paul McCorter: Learn Fusion 360 or Die Trying. It's about 16 videos around 20 minutes each, walks through the basics and makes using 360 easy and understandable. Highly recommended. The only issue is Fusion has been upgraded a number of times in the last several years and the selections covered in the tutorials have moved around a little.

After a project is designed, Fusion will export the file directly into your slicer for printing. Once you get the hang of it, it's a snap. Good luck.

Mike
 

crec

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There are several good slicer programs out there. Fusion will do it, but if you do not have fusion I would use either Cura or Slic3r. PrusaSlicer is a derivation of Slic3r and is also very good.
As to the original issue, the slicing programs work in millimeters so if you export in inches you can use the scale function in the slicers to multiply the size by 25.4.
I would also say watch vids on first layer issues. They can be frustrating when you start out.
 

SteamChEng

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One of the best YouTube channels for learning that I have found was Teaching Tech. He has a companion 3D printing website on GitHub with a lot of gret help too. I just started 3D printing last summer and found his tutorials extremely understandable and helpful. I have an Ender 6, which came with a Creality branded version of Cura slicer. I have since moved on and use the current regular version of Cura for my slicing, although I did experiment with Prusa Slicer too.

Teaching Tech 3D printing site: Teaching Tech 3D Printing

Teaching Tech YouTube: TeachingTech

His 3D printing site has tutorials and actual 3D printer calibration instructions with appropriate gcode included. As I mentioned before, I found it very understandable and extremely helpful as I learned about my printer and how to get the best results.
 

ddmckee54

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I agree with crec, PrusaSlicer is very good. I use Simplify3D for my slicer, I bought it a few years ago and at the time it was pretty much the Gold Standard for slicers... now not so much. The current version of PrusaSlicer will do ALMOST everything that S3D will do, and the price certainly is right.

A number of years ago I found a g-code simulator for 3D printers. While I was waiting for my first 3D printer kit to be delivered I played around with the available slicers using the simulator to evaluate how they preformed. I found that Cura would sometimes miss putting support where it was needed, a 3D printer will NOT start printing in mid-air. Because of that issue I shied away from Cura, I realize that they have probably fixed that problem, but once burned and all that.

I also found that Slic3r would leave a gap in the perimeter if it could not fit in a complete perimeter. S3D on the other hand gives you the option of deciding if you want to fill this gap, either with solid infill or a single line. Let me tell you, the first time you hear and see a printer trying to fill a 0.5mm gap in the perimeter with solid infill at 60mm/second.... talk about shake-rattle-and roll! I believe that the new versions of PrusaSlicer will also fill in this gap, don't know about Cura but I would guess they probably do too.

I used Slic3r for a couple of years, and I absolutly HATED the way it handled support, I always found it extremely difficult to remove, consequently I avoided using support like the plague. S3D lets you manually add supports where ever YOU want to put them, or remove them from areas where you don't think they are absolutely needed. I don't know if PrusaSlicer or Cura will allow you to do this. I do know that the PrusaSlicer now allows for 0 top layers on the support, Slic3r used to use the same number of top layers on the support as it did on the part, which is what made it so hard to remove.

I like Simplify3D, but if I had to make the choice between downloading PrusaSlicer for free, or paying for S3D - it would be a MUCH harder decision tpday than it was years ago when S3D really shined. When you add in the fact that S3D DOESN'T have a printer profile for my MP10 and an update, while promised, is unlikely in the foreseeable future....

Bottom line, slicers are kind of like cars, Ford-GM-Mopar-whatever they all get the job done - you just have to pick the one that you like.

3D printers can get kind of addictive, I used to have 1 and not I've got 3. I use mine to make a lot of different stuff, repair parts for lamps and lawn fertilizer spreaders, dust collector parts, Christmas presents... The list just goes on and on.

Don
 

Foozer

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For the times forgotten to set sketch to metric - Barbarian Plugin
Aqua Net and Isopropyl Alcohol are your friends -
Spare nozzles, drive belts, stock fans, tubing fittings and tubing for those times when -

Print a few dozen tetris blocks - Save the accuracy fiddling for later. Print the simple blocks to settle down what works for you. Sticks to the plate, walls look good, little to no stringing.

And this is going to happen once in a while . . .
 

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Mike N

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Thanks Mike I figured that out about 30 minutes ago actually. I printed a couple cookie cutters yesterday. Learned that I had my heat set way too low.

What slicer program do you use. I'm trying to use the software that came with the printer. I setup the heat for the nozzle and table and shortly after the code starts running the table is off and the nozzle temp goes to 190 even tho i set the software to 240. Upsetting!
I use Cura slicing software.
 

MarshSt

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I located my g-code update (Curasettinjector.txt) for the Cura slicer 4.9.1. You add this at the end of the original "End Code" code and it will include all of the print profile settings to the end of your g-code post for each part you print. It's a couple hundred extra lines and I use WinMerge to compare those sections if I need to figure out what I changed and forgot to write down. It is great for helping keep track of what changes you make and whether they worked or not. You can view the gcode file with any text editor and see exactly what the printer was commanded to do. Not sure what your g-code experience is but I attached a couple lists as well. See the attachments for the code file and how-to.
Steve
 

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skyline1

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3D printers can get kind of addictive, I used to have 1 and not I've got 3. I use mine to make a lot of different stuff, repair parts for lamps and lawn fertilizer spreaders, dust collector parts, Christmas presents... The list just goes on and on.

Addictive they sure are, you have been warned !

I'm in the same boat as you I started with a "Build it yourself" I3 clone kit, (GEEETech),

Assembling one yourself is a really good way to learn how they actually work and how to fix them if they go wrong. And actually pretty easy, anyone with the skills to build a model engine will find assembling a 3D printer a doddle.

Seeing it actually work for the first time turning an idea into solid objects I was left feeling what is this "witchcraft" and from then on I was hooked, In no time it seemed to be running almost 24/7 making all manner of strange objects.

I loved the thing and still do but I started to get a desire for something a bit bigger so enter printer no 2.

A few weeks after my order a delivery man came struggling up the path with an enormous box, this was my new Anycubic Chiron. On unpacking it I was beginning to think I had "bitten off more than I could chew" It was HUGE ! but I found a place for it and set it to work. Despite some shortcomings which any Chiron owner will tell you about ! it can make some amazing (really big) things.

I made the classic Benchy Boat test model for a friend, but this one was 4x normal size and I could have gone even bigger with ease. He was delighted with it.

So now I have big stuff sussed out I am looking at the other end of the scale, small high detail items. Printer No 3 will be a resin one.

So from one addict to another Don you are not alone.

Best Regards Mark
 

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