Making a D1 4 Chuck reciever for a rotary table.

Discussion in 'Machine Modifications' started by deere_x475guy, Jul 18, 2009.

Help Support HMEM by donating:

  1. Jan 16, 2016 #41

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    34
    Graeme,

    I myself never heard back from deere_x475guy, so I ventured to make my own. I can send to you a Pro/e cad file and or 3d PDF of the one I made if you'd like? You can take dimensions from either.

    Let me know.

    Mike
     
  2. Aug 12, 2016 #42

    coalburner

    coalburner

    coalburner

    New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ninefinger,
    Thanks, I still haven't heard back from this guy so anything you can send would be appreciated
     
  3. Aug 15, 2016 #43

    prophub

    prophub

    prophub

    Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2009
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hi Ninefinger,

    If you don't mind, could I get a copy of the PDF too?

    Thanks!
     
  4. Aug 16, 2016 #44

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Ex Bogstandard HMEM Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,693
    Likes Received:
    660
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Aeronautical Engineer
    Location:
    Crewe, Cheshire, UK
    Actually, Bob disappeared a few years ago from this and all other sites.
    The last time I spoke to him on Skype, he was going into production for himself, charging well over $400 for the finished article. Whether he ever got it up and running I have no idea, but I have seen some, a few years back being sold on the Bay.
    I wouldn't think there was much call for them as they are so bulky and also expensive to make, much cheaper to do what I did, I made an adapter to convert my D1-4 nose to Myford thread and use cheaper smaller chucks.
    So that the chucks could be swapped from lathe to RT (which also has a Myford thread nose) and vice versa with the job still being held in the chuck. It takes only a couple of minutes to convert the lathe back to D1-4.

    John
     
  5. Aug 16, 2016 #45

    kvom

    kvom

    kvom

    Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2008
    Messages:
    3,111
    Likes Received:
    585
    I have a D1-3 adapter that I made from the spindle of a parted-out lathe. I have mostly mounted it in mill vise vs. rotab.
     
  6. Sep 22, 2016 #46

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    34
    I have put into the downloads area some files for the D1-4 adapter. I hope that will help a few people out. I have not included a proper drawing yet as I'm in the process of learning Autodesk Fusion 360 and I haven't got there yet! Hopefully with the included files most people will be able to work out the required dimensions. One day I will get around to creating the drawing for this and I'll add it. I might do it as part of my exercises in learning Fusion 360....
    **Edit - I thru together a rough drawing with most required dimensions and added it***
    As to why I choose to go this route? My lathe uses the D1-4 chucks and I have 3 of them. All I wanted was a way to take the chuck from the lathe to the mill. Seemed like the best way to do it - 1 extra part that will stay bolted to my rotary table for extended periods. My mill is CNC and I'll eventually add cnc to the rotary table and I will be able to do 3 + 1 milling (I can do that now too, just program in a pause so I can rotate the part manually). Expensive to make? If I recall it was a $35 Canadian piece of steel and my time which although not free was time well spent.

    As for bulk - I intend to use it mostly with the axis parallel to the X-axis on my mill. I'm also not too concerned with Z space on my mill as it has ~18" which is plenty even when all the pieces are stacked up if I do use it pointing up.

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2016
    H. K. Barrows likes this.
  7. Sep 23, 2016 #47

    bazmak

    bazmak

    bazmak

    BAZMAK HMEM Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    2,120
    Likes Received:
    1,178
    Not being critical but just a comment.In an early photo you showed a hex collet
    block being gripped in the mill vice with flat to bottom and jaws gripping
    the corners.I would use it the other way,gripping the flats and locating the corner on the bottom of the vice.Which is the correct/preferred way
    Regards Barry
     
  8. Sep 23, 2016 #48

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Ex Bogstandard HMEM Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,693
    Likes Received:
    660
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Aeronautical Engineer
    Location:
    Crewe, Cheshire, UK
    He is long gone Baz, but I have to agree with you.

    But for anyone else reading, put a parallel under it as well, then you will know when it has been tapped down perfectly square.

    John
     
  9. Mar 29, 2017 #49

    skrewd

    skrewd

    skrewd

    New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Old thread I hope still works. I too would like to see your version of the plan. New to the forum, new to machining but now finally tooled up. Full size Bridgeport clone, vertical shaper, 1340 lathe, and a 4 x 6 bandsaw ready to slice that 57 lb slug down to size. A great starter project for the 10 inch rotary table. Thanks either way.
     
  10. Mar 29, 2017 #50

    MachineTom

    MachineTom

    MachineTom

    Senior Member HMEM Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2010
    Messages:
    885
    Likes Received:
    121
    While there are few limited situations that swinging the chuck from lathe to mill makes good sense. Overall I consider it a poor use of time to make a D-1 adapter. A 4" 3 jaw and a larger 4 jaw mounted to an RT make much more sense in terms of usefulness. IMHO

    A milling machine with a good DRO has a bolt circle program built in, and much quicker to use that an RT. As well as tangent functions, Arc segments on a mill are doable, but need handwork to be finished, an RT would not need handwork to finish, but setup calculations are often lenghty, and cutting arc's is not that easy in either case.
     
  11. Mar 29, 2017 #51

    skrewd

    skrewd

    skrewd

    New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have a single axis cnc adapted stepper motor attached to my 10 inch RT. I plan to use this in my conversion to a 4 axis cnc platform. The mill will be able to out perform my lathe at the task I am working toward. So yes I want a d1-4 adapter, just wanted numbers not opinion.
     
  12. Mar 30, 2017 #52

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    34
  13. Jan 6, 2019 #53

    jeep534

    jeep534

    jeep534

    Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2013
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    3
    Ninefinger,
    This is a very cool project , one I would like to make. I am going to mount a chuck to my bridgeport today to make a spanner socket (think little fingers) and it is kinda thin ( mill vise will crush)
    any drawings or build notes or drawings would be greatly appreciated.

    Happy Hunting
    archie
     
  14. Jan 8, 2019 #54

    vib

    vib

    vib

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2019
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Switzerland
    Hi everyone,
    Sorry to be qite à lurker but it's never easy to commit in a community when you have another one in your native language ;)

    I would be very interested in the drawing also, any chance to get it?

    Thank you
     
  15. Jan 8, 2019 #55

    kaolsen1728

    kaolsen1728

    kaolsen1728

    New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2017
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Pharmacist
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Ninefinger:

    I'd appreciate it if you would save the Fusion 360 cad files to the DWG format. Then those of us that use other cad programs can open them.

    Ken Olsen
     
  16. Jan 9, 2019 #56

    justintime

    justintime

    justintime

    Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2010
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    retired Mould Maker / Machinist
    Location:
    South Jersey , USA
    Hi,
    Are those dimensions / specs available in Machinery's Handbook ?
     
  17. Jan 11, 2019 #57

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    34
    No - the spindle dimensions for the D1-4 style are only listed in the ASME spec which is copyright protected - you can find some of the details on-line but I eventually gave up and bought the spec.
     
  18. Jan 11, 2019 #58

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    34
    There are drawings in the Downloads section. Looks like its on the 2nd page now, and the link I posted previously doesn't bring me there anymore, but a quick search should let you find it. The pdf's should have all the needed info to build your own. As mentioned in this thread I'd make it a slightly larger diameter if I were to do it again.
     
  19. Jan 11, 2019 #59

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    ninefinger

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2010
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    34
    Ken, attached is a DWG of the drawing - I can't export a DWG of the model itself. Also attached is the pdf for convenience of those looking for it.
     

    Attached Files:

Share This Page