Let's talk milling machines

Help Support HMEM:

goldstar31

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2010
Messages
3,364
Reaction score
1,232
Location
Twixt Tyne and Tees
I have a very similar "mill-drill" (Neither one nor the other, but a compromise). And it too has been modified to take an extra locking bolt to prevent rotation.

Nuff sed.
K2
I probably have same thing or sumular but like K2, I can live. within the parameters of the tool.
Whilst the neighbours might rightly 'take umbrage' at a larger tool, the question becomes more serious where planning permission has unduly to br sought for large premis es that might conceivab;ly be regar d ed as 'business' premises and - should permiddion be given, it would automatically not only attract r ates and goimg into a a higher basnd but lsrger rates and the nreddity to make business tax returns under in the case. of the UK - case 1 Schedule D whereas the normal Schrdule E exists.
Of course it doen't end there but as the notional value of the property inevitably rises- i.e, the 10.9% but being business premises- in whole or i psrt- arracts the dreaded Capital Gains tax.

I'm still with it in tax knowledge and those who sell on E-BBay from what is ostensibly their home - or indeed 'work from home; during the pandemic- are lible to prison or a fine and TREBBLE the tax which would have been due.

The HM Revenue have made no concessions ffor deaths through Covid-19 nor that people have had no alternative but to 'work from home'

As I learned many years ago in the Law part of accountancy---- IGNORANCE OF THE LAW IS NO EXCUSE.
So you think that playing about with an ov ersize lmll is exciting.

You ain't seen nuttin' yet
 

clockworkcheval

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporter
Joined
Dec 5, 2017
Messages
106
Reaction score
97
Location
Netherlands
Noise is not a big issue in my old countryside farm. My next neighbour 1 mile off is the nursery of my brother. He mainly employs farmer-kids from age 14 - 20 who try to save up for their first motorbike. Their daily noise easily surpasses any noise from my workshop. The top-sound is made by his annual nursery barbecue, when many village kids are introduced to their first serious encounter with alcohol. Somewhere early evening the party is joined by the local fire fighters who extinguish the abundant bonfires. And another year of relative quiet. My brother never complains of any noise made by me or my chainsaws.
 

MRA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2012
Messages
242
Reaction score
65
I have a very similar "mill-drill" (Neither one nor the other, but a compromise)...Don't blame the tool, just learn to live within its limitations...
I enjoyed your comments above, and it made me remember I had some updates to do on my own mill-drill thread (that is, doing what most people say is time-consuming and somewhat futile - turning a pillar drill into a miller). If anyone would like to see an alternative take on the mill-drill idea, have a flick though this. I think the link may work to the latest updates, and you can scroll back if you want to see more of this silly quest. Sorry the pictures are not very good - my shed is very small and crowded, hence the 'multi-tool' approach.


cheers
Mark
 

roncohudd

Member
HMEM Supporter
Joined
Apr 11, 2013
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
All my Bridgeport's was purchased over a 4 hour drive in LA or SF.
So good luck on finding it local.

Dave
I've been using my Bridgeport for about 8 years. Had to change the power feed from the old Bridgeport to an aftermarket. I've been using R8 Colletts for all my machining life. My Japanese Honeoye was a better machine than the Bridgeport although the Bridgeport is fine for my retirement days.
 

SmithDoor

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2009
Messages
945
Reaction score
133
Location
Clovis Ca
I put a servo type power feed on my mill.
Did put on power feed on yours ?

Dave

Yes, I had cleaned up the machine when I took those pictures. It definitely looks a wee bit more used at the moment - even though it has been sitting unused for two or three years!
 

awake

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporter
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
1,183
Reaction score
494
Location
North Carolina
These are NOT industrial quality tools - cost but a small fraction of a decent tool, so respect the tool you can afford, for what it can do, and don't expect "industrial" cutting speeds and feeds. Even though mine has a 1.5Hp. Motor, and FWD-REV control, I always tap by hand rotation so I can "feel" the cut. - Avoids broken taps, especially on a complicated job, or casting. (Easy to release the motor belt tension, to free the quill).
I like the machine, despite its shortcomings.
Don't blame the tool, just learn to live within its limitations, until you need or can afford better. This is a Hobby, to be enjoyed for as long as possible, not a business where speed and time are money.
Yep, that's what I did with Big Red, and though on a different scale, that's what I continue to do with the Bridgeport. Part of machining is knowing the limits of the tool. But part also is creative fixturing that lets you work beyond those limits. I did a lot of that through the years on Big Red, machining some parts that significantly exceeded the limited table travel. It is all about the fixturing!
 

awake

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporter
Joined
Sep 4, 2019
Messages
1,183
Reaction score
494
Location
North Carolina
I put a servo type power feed on my mill.
Did put on power feed on yours ?
I started to - worked up an X-axis power feed based on a windshield wiper motor. It did not perform very well, and I was needing to work on other projects, so it got set aside ... and has stayed in a drawer for the last 10 years or more. Now moot, since the BP has a power feed. The thing that really would have transformed the Big Red experience for me would have been a DRO on the table (even just a converted 12" digital caliper) - my lead screws were 6 tpi, which works out to .166666666" per revolution of the hand wheel, which works out to a major pain in the rear for calculating positions. I worked up a table that helped, and just got used to doing the calculations ... and as I said, did a LOT of milling on that little machine, in spite of its many limitations and compromises!
 

willray

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2014
Messages
92
Reaction score
34
As I learned many years ago in the Law part of accountancy---- IGNORANCE OF THE LAW IS NO EXCUSE.
So you think that playing about with an ov ersize lmll is exciting.

You ain't seen nuttin' yet
Just... Wow.

I have never in my life been so happy to live in a pretentious little upstart of a colony that decided that they'd had enough of this!

Will Ray
 

SmithDoor

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2009
Messages
945
Reaction score
133
Location
Clovis Ca
I purchased a power feed from Harbor Freight for large bench mill at same as did mill.
Later I purchased from Shars still new in box. I use dial indicators (2" stroke) on other tools I used on Big Red too.
It cheers the DRO like new.

Dave

I started to - worked up an X-axis power feed based on a windshield wiper motor. It did not perform very well, and I was needing to work on other projects, so it got set aside ... and has stayed in a drawer for the last 10 years or more. Now moot, since the BP has a power feed. The thing that really would have transformed the Big Red experience for me would have been a DRO on the table (even just a converted 12" digital caliper) - my lead screws were 6 tpi, which works out to .166666666" per revolution of the hand wheel, which works out to a major pain in the rear for calculating positions. I worked up a table that helped, and just got used to doing the calculations ... and as I said, did a LOT of milling on that little machine, in spite of its many limitations and compromises!
 

MRA

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 13, 2012
Messages
242
Reaction score
65
Just... Wow.

I have never in my life been so happy to live in a pretentious little upstart of a colony that decided that they'd had enough of this!

Will Ray
I think Norman might be a little confused (or is no longer in the UK?). Most of the country has been working from home for the last 15 months. There is no tax situation (though my gas bill certainly knows all about it, with people here all day through last winter).
 

BaronJ

Grumpy Old Git.
Joined
Dec 6, 2013
Messages
1,299
Reaction score
760
Location
York, North Yorkshire
Yep, that's what I did with Big Red, and though on a different scale, that's what I continue to do with the Bridgeport. Part of machining is knowing the limits of the tool. But part also is creative fixturing that lets you work beyond those limits. I did a lot of that through the years on Big Red, machining some parts that significantly exceeded the limited table travel. It is all about the fixturing!
Hi Guys,

Talking about fixturing this is how I fastened my 6X4 bandsaw body to the mill table in order to mill out the slot that the blade drops into. I put a solid metal block in there in order to support cutting thin slices of material.

04-08-2019x004.JPG

I used three pieces of M8 threaded rod to hold it and stop it moving.
 

BaronJ

Grumpy Old Git.
Joined
Dec 6, 2013
Messages
1,299
Reaction score
760
Location
York, North Yorkshire
I started to - worked up an X-axis power feed based on a windshield wiper motor. It did not perform very well, and I was needing to work on other projects, so it got set aside ... and has stayed in a drawer for the last 10 years or more. Now moot, since the BP has a power feed. The thing that really would have transformed the Big Red experience for me would have been a DRO on the table (even just a converted 12" digital caliper) - my lead screws were 6 tpi, which works out to .166666666" per revolution of the hand wheel, which works out to a major pain in the rear for calculating positions. I worked up a table that helped, and just got used to doing the calculations ... and as I said, did a LOT of milling on that little machine, in spite of its many limitations and compromises!
Hi Andy, Guys,

I designed and built an "X" table feed using a window screen wiper motor for my mill which I use to this day ! I certainly cannot criticise its performance, it certainly has no lack of power or speed. While the motor is reversible I built a tumbler reverse into the drive chain which gives me forward/stop and reverse. Its not commonly known that the wiper motors are not designed to be reversed.
 

goldstar31

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2010
Messages
3,364
Reaction score
1,232
Location
Twixt Tyne and Tees
As fas I am aware the Tax law has not changed.

If it has, plesse quote chapter and verse--- From the Finance Act.

The British Constitution ( Professor A V Dicey writing on it) reminds us that if '-

The Law is an ass
It is the LAW.
He. went on to remind us. that a country gets the government that t desrves.


i
 

SmithDoor

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2009
Messages
945
Reaction score
133
Location
Clovis Ca
The joy of spinning head and parts it just part of the hobby.
In my case fixed. No special bolts that titan to max or beyond.
Just a simple torque arm.

Dave

I have a very similar "mill-drill" (Neither one nor the other, but a compromise). And it too has been modified to take an extra locking bolt to prevent rotation.
But I have changed the original bolts for new high-tensile, and have no problem with rotation any more. Dynamically, I try and set-up so all milling forces/reactions are not developing torque on the head, but are directed towards the mill column. But that isn't always possible. Due to a very tight corner, the head is always at an angle to the carriage travel anyway, so I can only minimise the torque, not eliminate it. I hesitate to use the extra tapping as a locking bolt, as I don't want to damage the column, and the original location is wrong for me anyway. I have to raise and lower the head sometimes for drilling, or changing from milling to drilling, or chuck to bed of carriage. So judicious and careful lighter cuts and feed ensure I don't generate the torque that would cause slip of the head on the column anyway. When slip did happen, I found it was many tiny incremental movements, not a single slip. So you can't detect it happening. But a dab of typists correction fluid on the column/head that cracked at the first slippage showed me what was going wrong, and why the cut wasn't as the scale on the feed.
These are NOT industrial quality tools - cost but a small fraction of a decent tool, so respect the tool you can afford, for what it can do, and don't expect "industrial" cutting speeds and feeds. Even though mine has a 1.5Hp. Motor, and FWD-REV control, I always tap by hand rotation so I can "feel" the cut. - Avoids broken taps, especially on a complicated job, or casting. (Easy to release the motor belt tension, to free the quill).
I like the machine, despite its shortcomings.
Don't blame the tool, just learn to live within its limitations, until you need or can afford better. This is a Hobby, to be enjoyed for as long as possible, not a business where speed and time are money.
Different folks, especially blokes!
Nuff sed.
K2
 

Richard Hed

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2018
Messages
1,092
Reaction score
238
Location
Seattle
has anybody got one of these:
Grizzly G0757 - 9" x 39" 2 HP Horizontal/Vertical Mill with Power Feed

I'm thimpfking of buying one but want to know what other people thimpfk. There are only two reviews on it in the Grizz site. Does anyone know anything about it?
 

roncohudd

Member
HMEM Supporter
Joined
Apr 11, 2013
Messages
6
Reaction score
1
has anybody got one of these:
Grizzly G0757 - 9" x 39" 2 HP Horizontal/Vertical Mill with Power Feed

I'm thimpfking of buying one but want to know what other people thimpfk. There are only two reviews on it in the Grizz site. Does anyone know anything about it?
Don't know much about the Grizzly mills, but my Grizzly 13 x 40 lathe is awesome. So is my machine vice and rotary table.
 

SmithDoor

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2009
Messages
945
Reaction score
133
Location
Clovis Ca
If Big Red had longer table would be helpful.

But for small size is helpful in a small shop space and if you move too.

I use dial indicator for positing and not notice the lead screws was 6 tpi.

I did read on internet use a drill motor and simple worm gear box.

Dave

I started to - worked up an X-axis power feed based on a windshield wiper motor. It did not perform very well, and I was needing to work on other projects, so it got set aside ... and has stayed in a drawer for the last 10 years or more. Now moot, since the BP has a power feed. The thing that really would have transformed the Big Red experience for me would have been a DRO on the table (even just a converted 12" digital caliper) - my lead screws were 6 tpi, which works out to .166666666" per revolution of the hand wheel, which works out to a major pain in the rear for calculating positions. I worked up a table that helped, and just got used to doing the calculations ... and as I said, did a LOT of milling on that little machine, in spite of its many limitations and compromises!
 

Latest posts

Top