Spring Winder - Build your own springs

Discussion in 'A Work In Progress' started by jlchapman, Oct 28, 2019.

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  1. Oct 28, 2019 #1

    jlchapman

    jlchapman

    jlchapman

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    I've been working on my Webster engine(more webster goodness) . I got thinking about the springs. Looked at McMaster Carr, some were close. Then I decided why not make my own. Ordered music wire from McMaster Carr. Tried making a couple of springs. Not so easy without a fixture. So here is my first attempt.
    First attemp spring.jpg
    A couple of more attempts, but same results. So I searched the MEB magazine index. In issue 19 there is a Spring Winder by Dario Brisighella, Sr.
    SpringWinderDone.jpg

    So I ordered some 1.250 square aluminum bar. When the aluminum came I started on the fixture. First thing was get the dimensions of 1.25 x 1.0. So I took my face mill and cut one side down to 1.0"
    face mill.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2019
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  2. Oct 28, 2019 #2

    jlchapman

    jlchapman

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    I like to drill using my milling machine instead of the lathe. I mounted the body in the vise, found the center. Drilled first using a 1/4" bit to 3.25". Then used a 31/64" to finish the hole. Then used a 1/2" chucking reamer. I pulled the body out of the vise to compare with the drawing. I noticed I forgot to offset the 1/2" hole by .250. So I milled down another body and drilled another 1/4" hole first. I did some fancy layout this time with a sharpie so I wouldn't screw up again.
    Drilling.JPG

    When drilling that deep(3.250) with the 1/4" drill bit be careful because your flutes will be covered. Clean out often.
    IMG_4209.JPEG
     
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  3. Oct 28, 2019 #3

    jlchapman

    jlchapman

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    I'm going to post an isometic view of the spring winder. I hope that doesn't violate any copyright laws. I sure the moderators will let me know. Its hard to talk about the build without pictures of the assembly.
    IsoView.jpg
     
  4. Oct 28, 2019 #4

    jlchapman

    jlchapman

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    Now that I have drilled and reamed the 1/2" hole down thru the body. The next item is the brass pressure jaw(c). Its the upper part of the jaw, the lower part of the jaw is part of the body. I had never machined a 90 degree angle before in a piece of round bar. YouTube to the rescue. So I searched for how to cut a V groove on a milling machine. I'll just go over the basics from the video. I'm a hobby machinist, there probably is a better more accurate method.
    1. Mount the brass rod in the vise at a 45 degree angle.
    2. Using trig book a 45 degree angle is .707. So take half the diameter of the 1/2" brass rod. .250 time .707 = .177
    3. I used an edge finder to locate the low side of the rod. Set the x axis to zero. Then move over .177 and that is the center. Zero out your x axis now.
    4. Now move over the top edge and touch off with an 1/2" end mill. zero out the z axis.
    5. Move off the rod and raise the z axis to .176. Also move the x axis to zero.
    6. Now your ready to cut. Move both the z axis and x axis .050 for your first cut. All your cuts need to be equal movement on both z and x axis.
    7. I kept making cuts until the jaw looked like the plans.

    After my first test cut:
    IMG_4199.JPEG

    After the last cut:
    IMG_4200.JPEG
     
  5. Oct 28, 2019 #5

    Brian Rupnow

    Brian Rupnow

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    For springs as light as those used on the Webster, you don't need any specialized equipment. Use 0.010" or 0.015" diameter music wire from a guitar shop, put a piece of 1/8" or 3/16" diameter round stock in the lathe 3 jaw chuck, and trap the end of the wire under one of the jaws. Put the lathe on it's lowest speed and hold the free end of the wire in a set of vice grips, keeping tension on the wire as it wraps onto the mandrel. For tension springs, lay the wraps of wire next to each other without any gap. For compression springs, some folks use a piece of threaded stock in the lathe and lay the wire into the roots of the v shaped threads. The fixture you are building is great for heavier music wire.
     
  6. Oct 28, 2019 #6

    fcheslop

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  7. Oct 30, 2019 #7

    jlchapman

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    Brian - Thanks for the info. I tried using the lathe and at its slowest I didn't have the control I wanted. This spring winder is easy to make and will make a nice tool addition.

    fcheslop - Thanks for the website link. Part 2 was very informative.
     
  8. Oct 30, 2019 #8

    Gordon

    Gordon

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    I made the one you are making and used it for quite a while but it was hard to make a consistent spring and half of them ended up as a snarled bird's nest. I now have a VFD on my lathe so I can slow it way down. By setting threads per inch everything comes out looking good. I have made a wire guide which fits in my tool post so that the wire is fed in right next to the mandrel and keeps my fingers out of the way.

    That being said there is some merit in making new tools and that one certainly works for small non critical springs. I probably could have improved my results with a little more practice and more patience.
     
  9. Oct 30, 2019 #9

    jlchapman

    jlchapman

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    Gordon

    Thanks for the reply and your experience using the spring winder. I would be interested in the wire guide you made for your lathe. Maybe a picture.

    I'm almost done making the spring winder, so I will give it a whirl. Making the tool allowed me to try a couple of machining operations I have not done before. One of the great things on this website is learning new ways to machine parts. I'll admit, I just love to machine parts and try new operations. Its a good stress release since I still work

    Jerry
     
  10. Oct 30, 2019 #10

    Gordon

    Gordon

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    I need to learn how to add pictures. I can take a picture with my phone. I can save it to my PC but after I save it I cannot figure out where it went. It is someplace but I have no idea where. I will do some more investigation. Obviously taking pictures is not something I do on any regular basis. I have a couple of pictures but they are out in cyberspace someplace.
     
  11. Oct 30, 2019 #11

    jlchapman

    jlchapman

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    What phone do you have?
     
  12. Oct 30, 2019 #12

    Gordon

    Gordon

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    I have an iPhone SE. As I said I can save the pictures to the PC but I have no idea where they go. I tried emailing them to myself and they show up in my email and I can save them to my drive or download them. I will keep looking. I have done it in the past but I don't remember how I did it.
     
  13. Oct 30, 2019 #13

    jlchapman

    jlchapman

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    When downloading from email there should be a download notification on the lower left side of your screen. If you click the up arrow, you can click on 'show in folder', and it will take you to the picture.

    Otherwise you should be able to find it in your download folder.
     
  14. Oct 30, 2019 #14

    Gordon

    Gordon

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    IMG-0226.JPG IMG-0246.JPG OK I think that worked. I really am not the dumb. I work with my computer all of the time but this just did not seem to work.
     
  15. Oct 31, 2019 #15

    editor123

    editor123

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    jlchapman,
    I just ran across this article. Nice build. The design and drawings were published in Model Engine Builder in issue # 19. I have no objection to showing the build pictures although the isometric drawing of the winder and any other drawings are copyrighted by me. I'm OK about you posting the isometric drawing although you should have asked permission. Please do not distribute any other drawings.
    If someone wants detailed drawings of this winder, the cost of a digital issue is just $6 e-mailed to anywhere in the world. www.modelenginebuilder.com if you want to take a look at the back issues.
     
  16. Oct 31, 2019 #16

    jlchapman

    jlchapman

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    Gordon, Thanks for posting the pictures. I like how simple it is.
     
  17. Oct 31, 2019 #17

    Murph

    Murph

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    If you search for the patent as "Blaner" and "Spring winder", you'll find all the drawings you'll need to make one.

    I bought one of the Blaner spring wonders a while ago, love it!
     
  18. Nov 1, 2019 #18

    Gordon

    Gordon

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    It looks to me like that design and publishing of the drawings would be in danger of infringing on the Blaner patent unless the patent has expired. It looks like they are still selling that design.
     
  19. Nov 1, 2019 #19

    editor123

    editor123

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    The patent was in 1935 so it has expired. I was given the article by the author without a mention of an existing product. Done deal now and no way to detract it if there is a infringement. But I think 80+ years means it is expired.
     
  20. Nov 1, 2019 #20

    Murph

    Murph

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    Blaner made these in six different sizes back in the 30's, nobody has made those in decades!

    I'm a locksmith by trade, have a Blaner, a Porter Advance, several of the Hjorth winders to be used with.a lathe, and a Perkins spring coiler-one of the first to not require a mandrel for.a pattern or guide!

    Also have the Hook-on forming pliers for making the ends on extension springs.
     

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