Select 816 B Lathe Acquired

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As to the chuck, it is in very good condition. It is also very accurate. That is why I would like new jaws for it, as opposed to another chuck. The soft jaws idea may be a worthwhile option that I will research further. Thank's BaronJ and Norman.

As to the grease on the spindle bearings, that is what I will continue with because it appears that this lathe was designed with that in mind. The overheating could have been due (I guess) to all the old gummed up grease around the bearings. We will see.

As to the Logan 816 lathe, I just looked at some photos, and there is a similarity in appearance. Thanks, David. I will certainly delve into this deeper.

As to the link, BaronJ, I checked that out before I bought the lathe, and it helped sway me into buying it. Thanks.

Hi Danuzzo, Guys,

Please try and find out what the manufacturer intended about lubrication for that spindle bearing. I don't see any venting for allowing grease to escape, so pumping grease in will eventually fill the voids, and with nowhere for it to escape it will cause the bearing to rapidly heat up.

While high temperature grease is normally used on taper roller bearings used on motor vehicle wheels, there are also strictly allowable amounts and grades of grease that are applied.
 
If it says made in England then it's a fair bet it might be a P&B chuck. Does it have about a 3/4" circular depression in the face where a decal might have been. All my 3 P& B's have this but the decals have long since disappeared. Contact them and supply the numbers. They'll tell you if they can replicate the jaws.
RonW

The 600 group of companies now own P&B ! They wanted an arm and both legs for a set of 100 mm jaws for mine. They also wanted the serial numbers from the chuck ID decal.
 
If it says made in England then it's a fair bet it might be a P&B chuck. Does it have about a 3/4" circular depression in the face where a decal might have been. All my 3 P& B's have this but the decals have long since disappeared. Contact them and supply the numbers. They'll tell you if they can replicate the jaws.
RonW

No circular depression at all. There is a # on the face: "6612-1", the jaws also each have the # "016397". The face and the jaws of course also have #'s 1 to 3 on them. One the back of the chuck is where it states "Made in England". It has only 1 key insert on the perimeter.
 
BaronJ, I do think that the grease can escape. There was grease that was escaping on both the front and rear bearings. The reason it can escape on this lathe is that there are no seals. There is just a cover plate, which, if removed, allows one to see the roller ends.
 
I did get it all together today, and even had time to do a few test cuts. Ran nicely. No heating of any significance of the bearings. Maybe the old grease that was solidified was causing the overheating. Runs a little quieter, probably because of the bushing in the pulley and new belts. I really like this lathe :).

The only difficult part was getting the large bull gear to move forward to it's position on the spindle. I probably made a mistake by hitting the front of the spindle with a wooden mallet to get it to slide on because I caused the front bearing to hit against the race. Hope I did no harm :eek:. Most of the hitting with the mallet, after I realized that I probably should not be hitting from the front, was on the pulley while rotating it to different positions to move the bull gear to its forward position.

If I ever decide to replace the spindle bearings, I will have to figure out a better way, if there is one, to get that bull gear into position.
 
No circular depression at all. There is a # on the face: "6612-1", the jaws also each have the # "016397". The face and the jaws of course also have #'s 1 to 3 on them. One the back of the chuck is where it states "Made in England". It has only 1 key insert on the perimeter.

Could be a "Herbert" one. If it is they ceased to be years ago. You will need to take the jaws with you when you go looking for some replacements. As I said I got mine from Cromwell's here in the UK, MSC in the US probably has similar parts and if you can get into a branch they will be able to advise.
 
To disassemble or re-assemble lathe spindles, don't beat on it but pull instead with a threaded bar and washers/spacers. Here's pulling spindle out of a 9" South Bend. Re-assemble in reverse order...

John
 

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John, Thanks, I will certainly use that method next time. Great method. I wish I would have thought of it before the pounding.
 
As an update, I ended up purchasing a new Shars 5" 3 jaw chuck and a backplate. Should arrive next week. The back plate is machined with holes; but, I will have to cut to fit the shoulder. Chuck comes with 2 sets of jaws.
 
...

From your photos, looks like roughness inside the cone pulley bore from lack of lubrication.

Your roller bearings don't look too bad. I'd leave them alone, try oil lube and proper preload. I have several old late 1940's horizontal mills with similar bearings. Not nearly as nice looking as yours but still running fine and cool with proper preload...

John

John, I was reviewing this thread, and I noted that I neglected to comment on the fact that you were spot on with your assessment of the worn cone pulley bore and as to the bearings 👍.

I have been keeping the cone pulley lubed with oil. As I have posted, a bronze bushing was placed in the bore of the cone pulley which is cast iron, and it revolves around the spindle which is some kind of steel. Have you or anyone else heard of any issues of galvanic corrosion between these dissimilar metals in a lathe?

Update as to the chuck, I did get it, and machined the adapter for a good fit. It is a very nice chuck; however, I am somewhat disappointed in it's weight and amount it sticks out, unlike my other chucks. This thing weights about 13lbs, while my other chucks are less than 9lbs. and don't stick out very far. It isn't as easy to lift the new chuck. It turns balanced. I just hope it is not too heavy for my spindle and bearings.
 
We have one of these lathe's in our shop. The spindle belt is shot and needs to be replaced. Can you provide some instruction on how you replaced your belts? I'm mostly concerned about the disassembly of the spindle. But could use any help, tips, or tricks you can provide.

Thanks!
 
We have one of these lathe's in our shop. The spindle belt is shot and needs to be replaced. Can you provide some instruction on how you replaced your belts? I'm mostly concerned about the disassembly of the spindle. But could use any help, tips, or tricks you can provide.

Thanks!
If it's a vee-belt and you don't want to disassemble the spindle, just use a segmented belt.

Flat belts are usually made to be joined with a pin, though some folks don't like the 'tick' every time the joint comes around...
 

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This thing weights about 13lbs, while my other chucks are less than 9lbs. and don't stick out very far. It isn't as easy to lift the new chuck. It turns balanced. I just hope it is not too heavy for my spindle and bearings.
I also have a large chuck on my 9". Nothing bad has happened yet and the advantage of removable jaws outweighs any other consideration. All my machines have bronze bearings in iron castings, so I don't think galvanic corrosion is an issue on machine tools with this material combination.
 

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As you know the Myford lathe uses oil not grease, when I first got it, every zerk was full of grease, it had the drip feed oilers on it
so the last owner knew not to put grease on the bearings...
 
We have one of these lathe's in our shop. The spindle belt is shot and needs to be replaced. Can you provide some instruction on how you replaced your belts? I'm mostly concerned about the disassembly of the spindle. But could use any help, tips, or tricks you can provide.

Thanks!
I reviewed this thread and photos, and a few posts back, I learned that one should not try to hammer the spindle out. I used a threaded rod similar set-up like comstock-friend showed in a previous post when I, subsequently to this lathe, did my South bend 9 belt replacement. Are you having issues with yours?
 
I am pleased that this thread has somewhat been revived. There is not a whole lot of info out there on this lathe. It is still serving me very nicely. It is my go to lathe, although I also have a 4 -1/2 foot SB9a (1941) that works very nicely and is a great lathe. The Select lathe is just easier for the small stuff I do.
I also repaired one of the gear tumbler levers to where it is working great and not wanting to pop out of gear. Also did some work on the apron. The bronze bearing the machinist put in the cone pulley is also working great. In my opinion, this lathe works great now. It just needed a little "love" :) .
 
I reviewed this thread and photos, and a few posts back, I learned that one should not try to hammer the spindle out. I used a threaded rod similar set-up like comstock-friend showed in a previous post when I, subsequently to this lathe, did my South bend 9 belt replacement. Are you having issues with yours?
I was trying to gather as much information as I could before digging in to this unit. We only use this lathe to second op some plastic parts. While it doesn't see any hard use, it's also been a little neglected.

I'd like to get it back up and running in the short term, so I'm going to try the segmented belt that Comstock-friend recommended. The flats in the bottom of my pulleys are much smaller than the one on his machine. Hopefully the belt will ride deep enough.

I'll schedule some time after the new year to pull the spindle if needed.
 
I was trying to gather as much information as I could before digging in to this unit. We only use this lathe to second op some plastic parts. While it doesn't see any hard use, it's also been a little neglected.

I'd like to get it back up and running in the short term, so I'm going to try the segmented belt that Comstock-friend recommended. The flats in the bottom of my pulleys are much smaller than the one on his machine. Hopefully the belt will ride deep enough.

I'll schedule some time after the new year to pull the spindle if needed.
Good to hear you have resolved it. I would not have pulled the spindle on mine if it wasn't primarily because of the worn cone pulley, that gave gave me a chance to check why the bearings were heating up.
 
Just browsing, and saw this remark: "segmented belt that Comstock-friend recommended. The flats in the bottom of my pulleys are much smaller than the one on his machine. Hopefully the belt will ride deep enough." Are you talking of a segmented Vee-Belt? If I understand correctly, you are talking about belts for this?
1698569760638.png

V-Belts must contact the flanks of the Vee and never touch the flat at the bottom of the vee. - Just in case you were expecting that to happen...
K2
 
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