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russevertz

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I found this at the junkyard and thought it was a water pump, but now I am wondering if it is a steam engine. I have heard that sewing factories had personal steam engines for each sewer. Any insight or internet links would be welcome. It is about 18 inches long with about an 8 inch flywheel so give a size idea.

Happy to join the group here. I have built a few wobblers and want to get some Hit & Miss engines going since I am a blacksmith too.
 

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Not a Rotary valve as the valve won't do a full 360deg

It is a "rocking" valve that just moves in an arc. As the adjustable lever moves the cylindrical valve back and forth it will divert air/steam to one of the two plugged passages that can be seen in the first photo just below the valve and into the cylinder, at the same time the opposite end of the cylinder will be connected to the exhaust which is the hole in the top of the cylinder with the stub of pipe sticking out.
 
I found this at the junkyard and thought it was a water pump, but now I am wondering if it is a steam engine. I have heard that sewing factories had personal steam engines for each sewer. Any insight or internet links would be welcome. It is about 18 inches long with about an 8 inch flywheel so give a size idea.

Happy to join the group here. I have built a few wobblers and want to get some Hit & Miss engines going since I am a blacksmith too.
Welcome to the group

Dave
 
I'm more inclined to go the sewing machine route as at that size I would say it was made to power something small, what would often be termed a "Workshop" steam engine here. The Dunbar No2 "Popcorn" engine also has a rocking valve although it is not one of those it could well have served a similar purpose to what a small electric motor does today.

I'd just give it a good soaking and see if the engine can be turned over by hand, don't apply too much force to the flywheel so it slips as that will throw the timing off as the valve is driven off the flywheel rather than a separate eccentric. If it does turn over try about 10psi of air into the hole in the top of the steam chest while flicking the flywheel round.
 
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