My Squeeze Hole

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Bogstandard

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Here is a little insight into how I do things. First off I built a prefabricated sectional concrete workshop, 16ft x 9ft internal measurement after first laying a 6" thick concrete base, then fully lined the inside and ceiling with 2" insulation board faced with plaster. This keeps me warm in the winter with just a small fan heater.
This first pic shows my outside stash, all obtained from either the recycling yard or friends donations, the copper tubes on top are about 4" diameter, plus my sash weights which supply most of my cast iron.


This next shot is coming in from the door, notice not a lot of room. the machinery consists of, on the left a 1960's Herbert surface grinder, in the middle an Atlas 10F 42" bed lathe and on the right a standard type mill drill with a cheap 3 axis DRO fitted. I have to go sideways thru the gap and usually end up with watering eyes because the handles reach parts other handles don't.


This one shows the shop from the machinery end with the metal prep area on the left and build area on the right.


Bit of a closer view of the metal prep area plus my inside stash on the bottom shelves.


Build area consists of a small brazing/heat treatment area plus a marking out area. Next along is another marking area with my tapping stand followed by the engine build area.


This last shot is my workhorse, The Atlas 10F lathe, nearly 70 years old, but I have brought it right up to date by fitting a Timken roller bearing head, Myford resettable dials, quick change toolpost plus loads of other small modifications. This lathe is now super accurate, especially since I fitted a 5c collet chuck.


I live in here 6 to 8 hours a day.

John
 

rake60

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Nice shop John!
Add a beverage cooler and toilet and I'd NEVER leave it.

Only problem I see is that old lathe, but I'm willing to help you out on that.
I'll SWIM over and haul it home on my back to help you get rid if it. :wink:
70 years old and it will last another 70. They just don't make them like
that anymore. I'd be willing to bet it's still as solid and rigid as it was new.
You have a real treasure there!
 
B

Bogstandard

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Hi Rake,
You wouldn't be able to move it, coupled with a very heavy custom made stand, it just never moves. I check it with a level every now and then and it hasn't moved at all in five years.
Just keep it well lubed and clean and these pre-war lathes will last forever. But you wouldn't believe the state it was in when I purchased it.

John

Addition

I have just rediscovered this post, and would like to say, this lathe will be the most difficult thing to replace. It had become part of me and broke my heart when it was carried away. Funny how you can get attached to a bit of metal.
 

nkalbrr

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Nice shop, I would love to have it in my back yard
 

1Kenny

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John,

What is the machine with the two fly wheels on it? Fourth image on the right side of the bench.

Kenny
 

lugnut

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Kenny, I'm going to bet it's a punch press of some sort.
Mel
 
B

Bogstandard

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Hi Kenny,
Mel has got it in one.
It is called a toggle press.
It is hand operated but the 'flywheels' help to make for a very strong punching press. With a correctly angled punch, 3/16" brass sheet is punched straight thru. I use it mainly for blanking out brass and copper discs and pressure assembly of parts.
Not many about nowadays, but if you can get hold of any old stuff, snap their hands off.
As you can see from my shop, oldies are goodies, well made and last forever. You only have to look at my old lathe, late 1930's, made in the US, built like a brick s***house and the main part of it is a cast iron girder. Sixteen gears, reverse on the leadscrew and motor plus power cross feed, and by swapping the gears around will cut almost anything that will ever be wanted, including metric, left hand and multi start. It would cost a fortune nowadays to get a lathe that gave you all this. It is a shame that this one has to go, not enough swing on it for some jobs I am contemplating and as you can see, I don't have enough room to fit two in there.

John
 

Lew Hartswick

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John, you are likely to have problems if/when you try to machine those
sash weight. I hear they have nasty hard spots in them.
...lew...
 

tattoomike68

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I think John knows how to cut hard cast sash weights.

I just wish he would adopt a 39 year old Yankee tattooed kid who likes to make stuff. ;)
 
B

Bogstandard

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Lew,
Thanks for the advice, but I have my own techniques on cutting sashweights. I use them all the time to make cylinders for my little engines. Basically, cut off 3" from the opposite end of the loop, cut off the loop and what is left is usually very good for what we are making. About 60cents for a 12" length by 1.25" diameter, at that price it is worth the trouble of getting it out of the rough
I think in the posts somewhere I describe how I do it.

Mike,
I would love to adopt you, but I think you may be a bit big now for bouncing up and down on my knee, and no way would I shave you in the morning or change your diapers.

John
 

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