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Mediocrates

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Hi everyone,

Was a DT teacher, taught across the range of subjects, also A level engineering and product design (which taught me more than the kids I think!). Retired a few years ago, love working with metal, thought I’d give the ML7 a go. Needs fettling but looks fun.:)
 

GreenTwin

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Welcome.
I had two types of teachers in college; those who had never made/built anything, and those who had.

I greatly valued the teachers who not only understood the math and all the concepts of engineering, but could also put that knowledge into plain words that could be used and applied to building practical things.

Not too long ago, I decided to try model building.
It was very frustrating at first, but as they say in the Monty Python movie "I got better" (betuu as they pronounce it).
There is only one way to get better, and that is to practice and build.
If you don't succeed at first, try try again.

One teacher use to say "the best way to finish.....(fill in the blank), is to START on the.......(fill in the blank)".
Looking a picures is one thing; machining the parts yourself is a whole differerent thing.

Welcome, we look forward to seeing what you come up with.

Pat J
 

SmithDoor

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Welcome to the group

Dave

Hi everyone,

Was a DT teacher, taught across the range of subjects, also A level engineering and product design (which taught me more than the kids I think!). Retired a few years ago, love working with metal, thought I’d give the ML7 a go. Needs fettling but looks fun.:)
 

Steamchick

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Hi Mediocrates, Enjoy the Engineering, Machining knowledge, and Design stuff here. But avoid politics please, that upsets too many people who make models because that's what they enjoy doing. After 60 years from being a child in "engineering", I have learned bucket loads from the experts on this site.
Your knowledge is as welcome as your willingness to learn.
Thanks for joining us.
K2
 
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The ML7 is the ideal lathe for home machinists; rugged, easy to maintain and plenty of spares available on the interweb after-market. Make sure you replace the toolpost with something more modern and try to buy a lathe complete with a gearbox. Enjoy!
G
 

DickG

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The ML7 is the ideal lathe for home machinists; rugged, easy to maintain and plenty of spares available on the interweb after-market. Make sure you replace the toolpost with something more modern and try to buy a lathe complete with a gearbox. Enjoy!
G
Myford Super7 is a much better machine than the ML7. Better spindle bearings, 60 tooth bull wheel is better for dividing, longer cross slide, better top slide mounting system, clutch as standard, better range of speeds, faster top speed. Fit a 1 HP 3-phase motor driven from an inverter gives you variable speeds. DickG.
 

jpadirl

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Myford Super7 is a much better machine than the ML7. Better spindle bearings, 60 tooth bull wheel is better for dividing, longer cross slide, better top slide mounting system, clutch as standard, better range of speeds, faster top speed. Fit a 1 HP 3-phase motor driven from an inverter gives you variable speeds. DickG.
How does the Super 7 compare with Tri lever. Is there any benefit in changing the top slide from the 7. No experience so all help appreciated. Regards J.
 

DickG

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The TriLever is still just an ML7 with a system of selecting from three belts without having to manually change the belt from one pair of pulleys to one of the other two sets. It doesn’t have all the other improvements that the S7 has.
You could fit a complete S7 saddle, cross slide and top slide to get the advantages, but you would still be left with the spindle bearings, only twelve speeds rather than the sixteen of the S7, a slower top speed, a more awkward back gear selection system and a bull wheel with an odd number of teeth making dividing very difficult. The S7’s longer cross slide allows you to have a back tool post in place almost permanently making parting off easy and the S7’s top slide allows the top slide to be easily swivelled 360 degrees.
Even better would be a Super7B with the screw cutting gear box. DickG
 

abby

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Please don't start the which lathe is best argument , they are all better than nothing.
Hi M where in the WM are you from ? I am near Cov.
Dan.
 

Richard Hed

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Please don't start the which lathe is best argument , they are all better than nothing.
Hi M where in the WM are you from ? I am near Cov.
Dan.
LOL, that's absolutely true. I had a crappy Enco for about 15 years before I got a real lathe. I kikt and screamed at the cruddy little kiddy toy, but it did a lot of work. Now that I have a real lathe, the Enco just sits there taking up room.
 
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