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100model

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A while ago I disassembled a industrial sewing machine for cast iron melting so as a bonus there were some small gears that could be useful for making model ICE engines. Al these gears were made in steel except one.

photo 1.jpg

These are right angle drive gears that could be used for a side shaft ICE engine. They are 2:1 ratio and the large gear is 43 mm dia. small gear is 22 mm dia. 30 X 15 teeth

photo 2.jpg

I found another one but left the gears in the original housing so I know the distance between shaft centers.


photo 3.jpg


One of those two industrial sewing machines right angle bevel gear that are 2:1 ratio as well. I am not sure which gears had SIMANCO stamped on them which could be singer sewing machines.


photo 4.jpg


In my never ending quest for scrap cast iron an izuzu engine was dismantled and found the distributer drive had the same gears as the first two photos but the driver gear is larger than the driven gear. These are too big for models but one of these days I will make a full size side shaft hit and miss engine.

photo 5.jpg
photo 6.jpg



So I dismantled a modern sewing machine and found that that the driven gear is made out of plastic so if you think that is a bad idea have look at the next photo. Plastic gear is 27 mm dia. and the small gear is 12 mm dia, cams and gears are all made from plastic
 
I forgot to mention that the gears and plastic camshaft came from a Briggs and Stratton lawn mover, engine model number 550 ex.
 
I recall someone bringing their car into the gas station I worked at years ago, and the timing belt gear had plastic teeth.
The teeth failed, and so the enclosure was full of broken plastic.
I recall thinking "what a poor design".

These were the days of the Pinto and Vega.
A person at my high school died in a Pinto rear collision in the 70's. This was the norm for car safety in the day.
People would routinely bring Vega's into the gas station that had overheated, and the engine would sieze, due to running aluminum pistons in an aluminum block.

The Corvairs did not seem very safe either, and I recall them often having problems with that odd fanbelt that turned 90 degrees.

The Toyota minivans at one point had timing belts, and they would last about 60k miles, and then fail.
I had one fail on the expressway, luckily on a large downhill, and I coasted about 1/4 mile to the off ramp, coasted down the off ramp down the street, and finally was able to turn into a gas station. It is difficult to steer a car, and to brake with the power steering and power brakes turned off. Luckily my first car had neither, so I was use to it.
Toyoto I think now uses a chain drive. I have not had any problems with my 2013 Toyoto Sienna, so far.

I have never been into plastic anything, since plastic sooner or later will fail.

The 45 degree helical gears are available from McMaster Carr, and the speed can be varied by varying the gear diameter, but they don't offer two gears of the same size with a 2:1 ratio.
I guess there is just not enough demand for 2:1 ratio gears of the same diameter to make them commercially viable.

.
 
A little off topic, but about plastic gears...

On the Ford 3.0L Vulcan V6, around 1995, in my Ranger pickup they went from a distributor ignition to a "distributor-less" ignition. They kept the original distributor drive gear on the cam and used it to run the crankshaft position sensor and the oil pump. But since this no longer had to drive both the oil pump AND the distributor they figured they could use a plastic gear on the sensor. They also thought they could get away with plastic bushings instead of bronze bushings. The typical failure mode of this sensor was the bushing would wear and allow the shaft to move up and down. You might, or might not, hear a high-pitched squeal as the crank position sensor started to rub. Eventually the rubbing would cause the teeth on the plastic gear to shear off and you no longer had an oil pump. I lost mine about halfway across Illinois on I-80. I had 135K miles on the engine and was told I was lucky, they usually failed around 70-80K miles.

The radiator for that engine also had plastic top and bottom tanks. When the weather got below about -10°F (About -23°C) the things shrank enough that they would start slowly dripping coolant until they warmed up again.
 
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A while ago I disassembled a industrial sewing machine for cast iron melting so as a bonus there were some small gears that could be useful for making model ICE engines. Al these gears were made in steel except one.

View attachment 157475
These are right angle drive gears that could be used for a side shaft ICE engine. They are 2:1 ratio and the large gear is 43 mm dia. small gear is 22 mm dia. 30 X 15 teeth

View attachment 157476
I found another one but left the gears in the original housing so I know the distance between shaft centers.

What a great find! You KNOW at least one of those gears is going to come in handy very soon.
I disassemble almost everything that I have to throw out and add the "goodies" to the "for future needs" collection. It is amazing how, after awhile, just what you can make without having to buy anything new.

I actually consider it a personal challenge. Part of the geek sickness, I guess.
Lloyd
 
What a great find! You KNOW at least one of those gears is going to come in handy very soon.
You never know what you will find in discarded items and gears are a very time consuming item to make.

I talked to a person that repairs lawn mower engines for a living and he said that particular B&S engine had a known issue and it was not the plastic parts. The magneto bearing on the crankshaft failed, that is what was wrong with the engine I dismantled.
 
Well, you have to pity the poor car companies. If they made a good product, we would only need a new car every 25 years. They would go out of business.
No pity here - - - like zero!!!!!
There are enough people who change cars every 5 years whether they need to or not.
They would do just fine on that - - - just they can justify even higher salaries for senior executive if they can change that frequency - - - so they did (and are!).

I'm not so sure that we need all the car companies - - - and each thinks that they should be the top dawg.

What's worse in this they really no longer market anything that is truly economical to drive - - - nothing like my 1980 VW diesel Rabbit (Golf) - - - like nothing.
(And for those that complained about slow I would suggest that they didn't know how to use a transmission!)
 
Well, you have to pity the poor car companies. If they made a good product, we would only need a new car every 25 years. They would go out of business.
We do pity them in the US! During good times they take tremendous profits and when the economy tanks badly, they get the taxpayers money thru government bailouts by begging the government to help because they are "too big to fail", same for all big corporate groups, they need financial aid, breaks on taxes and utilities, infrastructure improvements... whatever. Because if the governments don't pay up, employees will lose their jobs and the local and state taxes won't be collected. The citizens don't need all of them, just a few that build good quality products and services that aren't designed to live 5 years begin to fail. But consumers are mainly price biased when purchasing and promote high priced junk cycle.
 
We do pity them in the US! During good times they take tremendous profits and when the economy tanks badly, they get the taxpayers money thru government bailouts by begging the government to help because they are "too big to fail", same for all big corporate groups, they need financial aid, breaks on taxes and utilities, infrastructure improvements... whatever. Because if the governments don't pay up, employees will lose their jobs and the local and state taxes won't be collected. The citizens don't need all of them, just a few that build good quality products and services that aren't designed to live 5 years begin to fail. But consumers are mainly price biased when purchasing and promote high priced junk cycle.
That's right, only it's not 5 years, it's 3 years.

A little history on GM. In 1995 the CEO of General MOtors decided to spend 45B$ (in 1995 dollars) to robotize the company. It failed--too many robots in too short a period. I suppose the workers training the robots sabotaged it as much as they could (I know I would have). The failure was catastrophic. By 2007 GM was attempting to move to Asia but that stupidest presidnet ever, managed to get 800B$ to distribute to the corporations--GM got 25B. The rest sim;ply disappeared--no accountability. The next loser president got blamed for it, the economy tanked. Taxpayers paid for it.

What gets me about all this is that we either get senile puppets for the banksters or we get out of control psychopaths for candidates. Jesix, it should be law that anyone over 68 cannot run fro prez.
 
Engineers spend a lifetime making things work. Totally unimportant to politicians. Fixing things is not their responsibility. They are only interested in how to gain more money for themselves, and don't even try to sweet talk the voters, or satisfy anyone except themselves. Politicians used to be unpaid in the UK. So we got people who just wanted to make the country better, and they chased money to improve their voters lives. But then we followed the USA model and let them vote for how much they should be paid. Politics went out the window. It's called "democracy".
K2
 

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