18 Pounder QF Mk 1 Cannon model 1:8 scale

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somniosus

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hi folks: As a frequent lurker and learning much from the HMEM community I wanted to share this project. Its not exactly a working engine but it is a working breech loading cannon and was made in the absence of any plans, pretty much by extrapolating from photos and a local cannon I could take measurements from. In fact it is remarkable that in this day and age you still cant find working drawings for a cannon that went into service in 1904, presumably as someone, somehere might make a version with the 6000 yard range of the original. As this cannon was really the backbone of the commonwealth First World War mobile artillery and like the Lee Enfield a mainstay weapon I wanted to complete it for 2018 as homage to the centenary of the completion of WW 1, but things don't always work out on time and it turned out to be a very complex project. Its no exaggeration to say there is hardly a straight line in this entire piece. No doubt the folks who are into solidworks and other modelling with print and c and c capablities could model this , I did it like my late Grampa, by cutting , eyeball and hand fitting for the most part with some crude hand drawings.As a result those of you who know this piece will recognise some cartoonish features, the barrel is too short, the wheels are too big,the sights are too wide and the breech is about twice as long as it should be . But everything works, elevation, traverse, brakes, all the little hatches open, breech recoils on a spring operated recoil tube, gunners seats are moveable, the Wellin style breech block has a 1: 2 90 degree bevel gear which rotates the breech block 90 degrees as you traverse the handle 180 degrees (that took 2 tries to get right) . There is firing rod right through the middle of the breech block which fires a plastic toy cap on a brass nipple in the breech when you tap it with a hammer, the barrel was made with a .120 inch steel brake liner for the bore. This is a cap firing toy that cannot chamber or fire ammunition of any sort, not a firearm for those in sensitive jurisdictions, but its kind of satisfying to hear a little snap and then watch a little smoke waft from the breech when you open it up.
 

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Very Nice Work
did you have the book
Early British Quick Firing Artillery by Trawin
It is a great book to have
Rich

It has lots of sketches, but no dimentioned drawings as you mentioned
 
Beautiful. It is nice that you can get noise and smoke when you "fire" it. Congratulations on making it without published plans. You definitely earned the title "Model Engineer" with this project.

--ShopShoe
 
Very Nice Work
did you have the book
Early British Quick Firing Artillery by Trawin
It is a great book to have
Rich

It has lots of sketches, but no dimentioned drawings as you mentioned
Thanks Richard , the best reference I found was on the Vancouver Gunners page . They re refurbishing an original 18 pdr and they have a link there to an excerpted chapter, attached, I am not sure from which book, maybe Travins, that shows great line drawings of various parts of the gun drawn in perspective. This allows you to sort of figure out how things go together but is not laid out in elevation or planar fashion so the actual dimensions are not there, you are still guessing. best regards Chris
 

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  • detail_drawings_qf_mk.1_18pdr.pdf
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hi folks: As a frequent lurker and learning much from the HMEM community I wanted to share this project. Its not exactly a working engine but it is a working breech loading cannon and was made in the absence of any plans, pretty much by extrapolating from photos and a local cannon I could take measurements from. In fact it is remarkable that in this day and age you still cant find working drawings for a cannon that went into service in 1904, presumably as someone, somehere might make a version with the 6000 yard range of the original. As this cannon was really the backbone of the commonwealth First World War mobile artillery and like the Lee Enfield a mainstay weapon I wanted to complete it for 2018 as homage to the centenary of the completion of WW 1, but things don't always work out on time and it turned out to be a very complex project. Its no exaggeration to say there is hardly a straight line in this entire piece. No doubt the folks who are into solidworks and other modelling with print and c and c capablities could model this , I did it like my late Grampa, by cutting , eyeball and hand fitting for the most part with some crude hand drawings.As a result those of you who know this piece will recognise some cartoonish features, the barrel is too short, the wheels are too big,the sights are too wide and the breech is about twice as long as it should be . But everything works, elevation, traverse, brakes, all the little hatches open, breech recoils on a spring operated recoil tube, gunners seats are moveable, the Wellin style breech block has a 1: 2 90 degree bevel gear which rotates the breech block 90 degrees as you traverse the handle 180 degrees (that took 2 tries to get right) . There is firing rod right through the middle of the breech block which fires a plastic toy cap on a brass nipple in the breech when you tap it with a hammer, the barrel was made with a .120 inch steel brake liner for the bore. This is a cap firing toy that cannot chamber or fire ammunition of any sort, not a firearm for those in sensitive jurisdictions, but its kind of satisfying to hear a little snap and then watch a little smoke waft from the breech when you open it up.
Well done, that is a lovely bit of work. You should be very proud of your efforts.
 
Did you add up how many hours you spent on this amazing project
Thanks Emconut. Hundreds of hours, I gave up trying to track it but probably 4 to 500 would be about right.I believe Zane Palmer of Palmers Armory is doing a build of the similar 13 Lb QF cannon- over 1100 parts in it. He is definitely the Faberge of cannon builders imo.
best regards Chris
 
Great work!
If you ever get to the NYCarea, I'll buy you lunch and we can talk about you incredible project.
 
Thanks Henry for the generous comment! This model has provoked a lot of interest here locally at militaria shows.
 
snip This model has provoked a lot of interest here locally at militaria shows.

I'm curious if you've thought of creating a series of models - - - you've got the WWI version nailed here.
What about from the first bronze cannons (thinking 1700's but not sure) until the version you have so wonderfully completed?
Sorta like the history of the 18 pound cannon/gun.

I love the look of the old naval guns but your model is in a class that's quite something else - - - thank you for sharing - - - sir!!!
 
I'm curious if you've thought of creating a series of models - - - you've got the WWI version nailed here.
What about from the first bronze cannons (thinking 1700's but not sure) until the version you have so wonderfully completed?
Sorta like the history of the 18 pound cannon/gun.

I love the look of the old naval guns but your model is in a class that's quite something else - - - thank you for sharing - - - sir!!!
hi Ajoieam

There are plenty of available small brass and bronze barrels 18th/19th c models you can finish-try Dixie Gun Works for start, they have a great 50 cal naval and field carriage barrels and carriages . Best regards Chris
 
Truly a beautiful cannon. I could only imagine the work, expense, the endless hours, the skill, needed to fabricate this interesting hunk of metal....and I could also imagine the pride and joy that results from your efforts.

Thanks for the pictures.
 
thanks BronxFigs, what a great community we have in HMEM , and the positive feedback is humbling to a relative hacker like me. cheers Chris
 
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