Quantcast

Read this if you DON'T have a QCTP

Help Support HMEM:

Philjoe5

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2007
Messages
1,727
Reaction score
319
I've had my first lathe for about a year and a half, a 9x20. Last fall I upgraded to a 10x22 and it had a cheesy toolpost holder designed so that several of my tools would not fit, like half inch boring bars. Now I have two lathes each requiring their own sets of shims for various toolbits. So after a few months of this and the fact that I couldn't do any boring on the 10x22 I bought a QCTP for the 10x22, an AXA 100. Just finished setting it up today. If you've been thinking about getting one, do it now! It is really a great addition to your lathe and quite easy to set up. If only I had started out with one. With the time saved I'm sure I could have built a 1/4 scale Corliss steam engine by now. :D

Cheers,
Phil

PS: my retirement income is in no way supplemented by the sales of any particular brand of QCTP. ;D
 

Powder keg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2007
Messages
1,091
Reaction score
3
Try This instead. Save your money for beer or more holders:O)

Wes
 

tattoomike68

Well-Known Member
HMEM Supporter
Joined
Jul 8, 2007
Messages
628
Reaction score
14
Powder keg said:
Try This instead. Save your money for beer or more holders:O)

Wes
Wow thanks, thats way cheaper. That would save enough money to get a rotary table too.
 

Powder keg

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2007
Messages
1,091
Reaction score
3
Any time! I always shop for tools. Sometimes a week or more? Unless I'm desperate for it to finish a job:O) There is also the wedge type for $120 or so. I have one of each and have noticed no difference.

Wes
 

shred

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2007
Messages
1,949
Reaction score
6
I got the 100-size Phase II (piston) one day when Enco had them on sale and it's been great. On my lathe, I don't think I'd notice whatever wedge advantages there are.

 
S

Swede

Guest
The wedge-types shine when you need absolute perfection when remounting a tool. This is most useful when you have a DRO that allows for a tool set, meaning you can change to another style of turning tool, select that new tool's number in the DRO, and the DRO will reconfigure the axes so the new tool is turning the correct diameter.

I'd say for 96% of what a home shop guy does, a piston tool is just fine. If all you want to do is swap tools quickly, and have them on center height, go with a piston.
 
Top