DuraFix Aluminum Rods

Discussion in 'Tips and Tricks' started by rake60, Mar 8, 2008.

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  1. Mar 8, 2008 #1

    rake60

    rake60

    rake60

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    I think this product is one of the best aluminum fabrication rods I've ever seen.
    I just received permission from DuraFix to use their video in a direct post here.

    [ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jijW310xvp4[/ame]

    It really works that easily!
    There is more information about it on their web site at http://www.durafix.com/

    Rick

     
  2. Mar 8, 2008 #2

    Brass_Machine

    Brass_Machine

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    I have seen the video before. I have seen a few demonstrations but, I have never encountered anyone who has used the stuff.

    Have you used it before Rick? I think I should just bite the bullet and give it a shot.

    Eric
     
  3. Mar 8, 2008 #3

    rickharris

    rickharris

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    OK Wrong rick but anyway.

    I have used a similar UK available product to join aluminium parts.

    It appears to do what it says on the can - Its easy to use.

    I am not sure it qualifies as a weld though - I think the penetration is less then welding - more like silver soldering.

    For aluminium it works.

    I was not aware it will join other non ferrous metals though. As a joining materials it is quite expensive.

    http://www.hindleys.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=7853 is the stuff in the UK

     
  4. Mar 8, 2008 #4

    rake60

    rake60

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    Yes I have used it.

    It does make very sound joints in aluminium.
    I wouldn't consider it welding my any means as there is NO
    penetration into the base metal.
    It's is more of a brazing rod.

    If you are joining heavy parts they need to be prepped by grinding or
    cutting a tapered weld prep to be filled with a wider fillet of the filler material.
    I have not tried it on dissimilar metals myself. I'll have to do that.

    At $45 USD per pound it isn't cheap, but compared to other
    aluminium brazing and welding rods it is competitive.

    Rick





     
  5. Mar 8, 2008 #5

    deere_x475guy

    deere_x475guy

    deere_x475guy

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    They want $65.00 for this Starter package. I imagine for the HSM type guy 34 rods would last forever. Rick do you know of a place to get it cheaper? The info below came from this link:

    http://aluminumrepair.com/shopping/shopdisplayproducts.asp?id=10&cat=HTS-2000

    HTS-2000 Starter Package - Aluminum Repair

    1 POUND HTS-2000 Starter Package
    (Repairs all non-ferrous alloy such as aluminum, cast aluminum, zinc, pewter, aluminum magnesium, pot metal, copper any metal except steel.)


    1 lb. orders packaged in clear Butyrite tubes - 34 rods per pound, width 3/32.
    FREE video, tinning brush, and step-by-step instructions included.
    Your savings is 50% off the regular price by ordering online!
     
  6. Mar 8, 2008 #6

    rake60

    rake60

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    Bob

    If you scroll down on the http://www.durafix.com/ site you will see
    they sell the rods only for $45 per pound including shipping.

    The "Starter Kit" includes an auto igniting torch head.
    I may be getting old, but I can still use a striker to light a torch.

    I have no affiliation with the DuraFix company and have nothing to gain
    by promoting their product. I AM very impressed with the simplicity of
    the application of that product!

    My hobby welder is flux core only so it is not capable of running aluminium wire.
    I've tried other aluminium brazing rods. I know a skilled welder can make
    beautiful repairs and fabrications using them.
    For me it looked more like turkey droppings on a dead leaf. :-\

    This stuff is much more forgiving.
    It is as easy to use as soft solder.

    Rick







     
  7. Mar 8, 2008 #7

    gilessim

    gilessim

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    I probably shouldn't say this but I saw on the durafix site that they were looking for a distributor here in Italy so I sent an email enquiry and I had a very polite reply stating that I would have to buy a certain amount of rods, or kits for a price with not a great margin for profit but never the less a viable proposition, I'm still thinking about it because it looks to be a good product!, it's good to hear some positive feedback from someone who has actually used the stuff!

    Giles
     
  8. Mar 8, 2008 #8

    BobWarfield

    BobWarfield

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    That's a cool product Rick!

    Not cheap, but for small projects, it opens up what you can do with aluminum.

    Thanks for sharing the video...

    Best,

    BW
     
  9. Mar 8, 2008 #9

    deere_x475guy

    deere_x475guy

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    If I decide to give it a try I will sell off some of it to any interested members at cost of course.

    Would this stuff work for steam? I think I remember it saying that it melts at 750 degree.
     
  10. Mar 8, 2008 #10

    rake60

    rake60

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    I've never run an engine on steam that I've used the DuraFix rods on.
    Unconstrained water boils at 212 F. At 15 PSI that boiling temp raises to 257 F

    I think it would take a whole lot of pressure to raise the temp to 750 F

    Rick
     
  11. Mar 8, 2008 #11

    BobWarfield

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    If it is still not boiling at 750, it might be better if the weld gives way and releases the pressure before the silly thing grenades.

    BW
     
  12. Mar 9, 2008 #12

    mklotz

    mklotz

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    If I've done my arithmetic correctly, 343 atmospheres or about 5043 psi.
     
  13. Mar 9, 2008 #13

    GailInNM

    GailInNM

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    I have not used the Durafix brand name, but I have used several similar products for about 20 years.
    They all seem to work about the same as that shown in the Durafix video. On EBay there are several sellers with prices down to about 10 dollars for a quarter pound package with free shipping. Search for ALUMALOY or aluminum repair I have also bought some from Home Depot in the welding section, but it has been several years and I have not looked to see if they still sell it. As I recall there were about 3 sticks in a blister pack for a few dollars.

    It works well within it's limitations. It does not flow so it will not wick into a crack. To make a butt joint I have "tinned" both parts and then rubbed them against each other while they were hot so they fused. I made up a temporary drive arm for running the table on my import tool grinder to use as a powered surface grinder. Made two butt joints at about a 30 degree angle with 1/4 x 3/4 6061 bar stock. I milled the ends of the bar so there was a close fit and them butt jointed them as above. This was a temporary job about 15 to 20 years ago, but it has not broken yet so I still have not made up a proper arm.

    It takes a LOT of heat to get anything very thick up to temperature as the aluminum is a very good conductor of heat. It turns grey after a few years so any unpainted patch or joint really shows up. It is much harder than aluminum so it is difficult to blend with a file.

    Gail in NM,USA
     
  14. Mar 9, 2008 #14

    deere_x475guy

    deere_x475guy

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    Boy that last line was a duh moment... ???
     
  15. Mar 9, 2008 #15

    Stan

    Stan

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    Similar products were around in the 1930s and were used to repair the diecast grills in cars of that vintage and later. I have used it on a lot of things but never on ferrous material. Aluminum alloys and zinc alloys work fine.

    I refer to it as a brazing rod and have made up air conditioning fitting by brazing two halves together to get the combination I needed. I also repaired a broken hinge joint in a folding aluminum ladder that has lasted for a lot of years.
     
  16. Mar 9, 2008 #16

    rake60

    rake60

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    As many of you know I used to run a small engine repair business.

    A friend of mine came in here one day with an engine case off his kid's 4 wheeler.
    The kid had decided to change the oil himself and got a little confused as to which way
    was out on the drain plug. He pulled the threads completely out.

    I drilled the drain plug hole oversize, closed it up a bit with the DuraFix rod, ground it
    flat, drilled and tapped it. That was 2 years ago. IF that kid can pull the threads out of
    that stuff I'll be signing him up for the Ultimate Fighting Championship! :D

    It IS much harder than the base material but it can be machined, ground or filed.
    It's much easier to tap or thread then the base material.

    I'm very happy that Randy Weeks gave me his permission to show his video here.

    When I get time I will do a video of my own to show how it works for me.

    Rick
     
  17. Mar 9, 2008 #17

    Lew Hartswick

    Lew Hartswick

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    Rick, I can't seem to make the video go. I think I've tried it on other posts and for some reason this
    site they dont run. On other BBs I have no problem. Just click or maybe it double click on the triangle
    in center. But nothing I can do here works. Any ideas?
    ...lew...
     
  18. Oct 24, 2011 #18

    Jon

    Jon

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    I'm going to drag this topic out of the archives. I have a question I hope Rick can answer.

    I have a very worn out Clinton engine that my uncle wants rebuilt. The problem is that the bore is oversize and out of round enough to warrant an overbore. The piston is worn undersize and the top ring groove has about .009" clearance.

    My question is since oversize pistons are unavailable can I solder the one I have and then turn it to fit a new bore? I am concerned the solder will remelt once the engine is running. Will it stand up to that kind of heat and friction?

    I would love to get this engine running again but I'm starting to think it's a lost cause. I would welcome any other suggestions for what to do as well. I will talk to a local automotive machine shop one day this week and see what they recommend.

    Thanks,
    Jon
     
  19. Oct 24, 2011 #19

    Ed T

    Ed T

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    Jon, I have used that material for some repairs on crankcases and such and it works well, but I really doubt that it would work for building up your piston. It my experience, it does not wet out the base metal very well you have to put it where you want it. I think it would be very hard to build up enough material on your piston to do the job. Also, as I recall, a lot of pistons are high silicon aluminum which may add to the difficulty. It might be possible to tig the OD of the piston and then machine it back, but you'll end up with the worlds most expensive piston for a Clinton. Maybe there's a vintage Clinton group that could help out.
     
  20. Oct 24, 2011 #20

    hopeless

    hopeless

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    A long shot but would it be possible to cast a piston? I was thinking maybe melt some old pistons to get the correct mix and then cast it and machine it to the tolerances needed.
    Pete
     

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