Dear God... let me learn just half what he's forgotten

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Cedge

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without comment.....

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlY_zxgnMAg&NR=1[/ame]

[ame]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3YfTtGCsiD8[/ame]

Steve
 

steamer

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Amen to that brother! :bow:


Hadn't seen that config before....really cool!

Dave
 

Troutsqueezer

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Good insight as to how one would approach making such a complex model. A part of me wanted them to run on fuel but I can see the attraction to have them run on air - quiet, just the sound of metal playing against closely-machined metal. A nice sound, with zero vibration.
 

ChooChooMike

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th_confused0052 th_confused0052 th_confused0052

Thm: :bow::bow::bow::bow::bow::bow:

WOW !! Now if only they'd get them running on gas !!
 

Swede

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Beautiful work. I think there is a secret to making a model of such complexity... it's pretty simple, guys like this have enormous patience.

Multi-cylinder IC engine models have an enormous number of identical parts, especially fiddly little things like valve C-clips, valves, rockers, etc. If you look at the huge parts layout before final assembly, there's not one part that isn't within the reach of most of us here. If you have the patience to machine 36 valves from stainless steel, 18 pistons, 36 rocker arms, then after a LONG period of time, you will have a "no-machining kit of parts." Assuming you worked to print & tolerances.

If you look to each part, each sub-assembly, as a mini-project all by itself, it helps. You machine a head, finish it, admire it, consider it complete, and you get that rush of satisfaction. The part gets carefully wrapped, labeled, put aside, and you move on to the next.

What is definitely on another plane here is the design aspects. Very few men have the skills to design something like this. The maker also has outstanding hand finishing skills. He knows how to file, how to use abrasives, and this takes a nice model and raises it to another plane in fit & finish.

Hopefully, something like this is inspiring rather than frightening. I know it inspires me.
 

gmac

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..... ahh, but I like the part where he still uses a hand file and elbow grease!

Swede you are spot on. As my old aerodynamics prof once told me "there are no complex problems, just big problems that need to be broken down into a pile of little problems that you can work thru systematically." Glad you reminded me, I'm looking at the plans for the Bentley BR2 I purchased two years ago and have done nothing with other than look at and study. If I'd only slowly started making one part at a time I'd be finished long ago.....

Lets all get at it....

Cheers Garry
 

flatbelter

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ga... maybe if I practice for twenty more years.... and some tool upgrades...

Sure is a beauty. Thanks for posting

I'm still working on perfecting engines without valves, it'll be a looooong time before I open that can of worms. At least I'm making engines with moving parts now, one step up from making rocket motors. (no moving parts)

Just ordered some parts in for building my first CD ignition system to go with my newest RC plane engine, in 80" scratch built plane, with hand carved prop. If I get bored today I can start winding the coil.

I'm heading back to the garage, I need more practice. :-\

FB
 

Swede

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One thing we didn't mention is the ease with which parts 3 through 18 fly off the machine. In other words, part number one or two can be tedious and a bit slow, but once you have the knack, subsequent parts benefit from a huge learning curve. It might take 1 hour to produce the first rocker arm, but the remainder might take 30 minutes, 20, 15... or less. Especially when you make fixtures to aid in the work.
 

pelallito

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Awesome work! Thanks for posting them.
Any chance that he would be interested in becoming a member and share his knowledge and skill with us?
Fred
 

Cedge

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Swede...
No argument here. Repetitive parts get progressively easier, but designing those engine on paper is a whole different kettle of fish. Hand grinding the cams is just insanity at its best....LOL

Steve
 

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