Charity Shop Beam Engine.

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Tony Bird

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Hi,

I had no intention of making another engine from bits bought in a charity shop until I saw this set of scales on offer for £5 and thought beam engine!



It cleaned up well.



Then the butchery began.






Main bearings were made.



Flywheels made from wheels of a previously played with model cannon were fitted.




I suspect the remaining design and construction will be governed by what else can be found to recycle.

Regards Tony.
 

ShopShoe

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Tony,

I will be watching. I am always amazed by your ability to see engine parts in charity shop items. I have some objects of my own that I can see being recycled in an engine project someday. Some may not agree with this approach, but I like all kinds of mechanical objects and using the "artsy" side of the brain is just as good for the soul as using the other side.

Keep it up

--ShopShoe
 

bazmak

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I cannot think of anyone not agreeing with this approach.But yes I suppose
there would be a few that think the world is still square.Keep up the posts
I am truly amazed at what you achieve . Regards barry
 

Tony Bird

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Hi,

I have to admit that playing with these charity shop purchases I find fun. Having made many models of both my own and other peoples designs not being exactly sure how things will workout/evolve is interesting.

Did some more work on the beam engine yesterday.

Fitted bearings for the beam and drilled some holes for oil pots.



The recesses in the end of the beams were drilled out and plugged.



What did take a lot of time after the plugs were fitted was machining and drilling the ends of the beam for connect rod and piston rod bearings.



Regards Tony.
 

Tony Bird

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Hi,

I haven't got lot done over the weekend, yesterday we went to Bath for one of our granddaugters birthday and while there saw a rather nice Daimler delivery van that had picked up a parking ticket!



I did manage a few hours in the shed this afternoon when I made two oil pots.



And fitted pivots to the ends of the beam.



The beam has had some etching primer applied to see how well it will fill all the cracks.



Regards Tony.
 

tornitore45

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There is no artsy side on my two left brains but sure admire the creativity displayed by such projects.
 

Tony Bird

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Hi,

Today I made a start on the clevise for the connecting rod. A brass base from a clock case was recycled, hard work as it was too large for my mechanical hack saw.



Holes were plugged.



With luck I have enough material for the two clevises and the connecting rod big end.



One of the clevises was roughed out.



And fitted to the beam.



Having had a look through 'Might come in useful box' I found the remains of a shaft, I think from a toasting fork. This will become the connecting rod.



The model as it now looks.



Regards Tony.
 
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bazmak

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Love the work but must disagree on your idea of hard work cutting a piece of brass with the hacksaw.I too do not have a power saw.I cut a oiece of 5"dia
mild steel with a hacksaw,70 yrs of age and 1 and 1/2 hrs later bingo
I wont be doing that again in a hurry
 

tornitore45

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I cut a 1" x 2.5" steel bar with the hack saw once, age 65 at the time, never again.
 

Tony Bird

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Hi,

As I have arthritic thumbs and wrists I try to keep sawing to a minimum.

The big end was made today as there was enough material to make it and the other clevise'

Drilled and tapped to hold the split bearing together.



Cut into two.



Mating surfaces machined.



The two parts bolted together and centre drilled.



Drilled and reamed to size.



Shoulder for connecting rod.



Glued to mandrel with shellac.



Turning axle shoulder.



A drift was used to make the connecting rod round at its ends after it had been annealed.



Part assembled connecting rod.



Test fitting of connecting rod.



Regards Tony.
 

Cymro77

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Tony - it looks good at this point, will be following closely. I hope you are able to get shop time.
I wish I could find one of those mechanical hacksaws, since I am physically and dynamically challenged - the piece would be unrecognizable after the hacksaw massacre. I have been unable to find a home workshop appropriate mechanical hacksaw. Will buy it when I do.
 

Blogwitch

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I love this sort of 'blingy' stuff, especially if it is made from discarded or non useful bits and pieces. My junk box is full of bits that may come into use at sometime or other.

I used to have the name of bling king at one time because I would concentrate more on the looks rather than operation, but with just a little work, you can have both.

Your con rod reminds me of some column supports I made for my Elmers Mine Engine, in an attempt to make them look a little like barley twist. I thread cut them with a round nosed tool, with the lathe turned by hand (it was too dangerous to use power because it was something like 2 TPI multi start thread).

But it does prove that a little extra work can completely change the look of a mundane looking engine. I was after the Victoriana look, where everything was made ornate rather than just brute force, the very same look that yours is taking on.





Keep up the great work


John
 

Tony Bird

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Hi,

I have done a little more to the beam engine after a bit of a rest. I have to decide on what to make the cylinder from, what sort of valve gear and whether to use parrallel motion.

While thinking of what to do and what to use I have painted what has been made so far.





Regarding the fitting parrellel motion, given the shape and lightness of the beam I think parrallel motion might look a little heavy. I have been considering using a cross head and connecting rod see attachment.



I have never seen a beam engine like this before and I think it is a bit ugly but the idea might work. Any suggestion or more information on this type of engine will be considered.

Regards Tony.
 

Tony Bird

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Hi,

While still thinking about a cylinder/valve gear I came across a cylinder fitted with a trunk guide that I made many years ago, unfortuneatly it is too large but the idea might be the way to go.




While hunting around for ideas I found a long pipe connector that might be long enough to make a cylinder and trunk guide.



It has a 15mm bore which is quite well finished.



So some drawings and sums will have to be done. Which won't happen for a bit as come tomorrow we will be away playing trains in Peterborough for a few days.

Regards Tony.
 

Tony Bird

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Hi,

As nothing suitable has come up, except for a rather large cast iron cylinder set for a 5"/7.25" locomotive probably GWR. If anyone has a very large flywheel, a horizontal engine might be made.



So it was decided to use the pipe connector for the basis of a cylinder. First the fitting was machined parallel between centres.





A shoulder was turned at one end.



The tube was parted off.



And a shoulder turned on its other end.



Bushes to hold the cylinder covers were turned and silver soldered onto the shoulders and the cylinder lapped.



Next a bottom cylinder cover was started which would also serve to hold the cylinder to the bed plate of the model. Alas no suitably thick brass sheet was in stock so it was decided to make some. This was achieved by soldering two thinner brass sheets together. First two square over size parts were roughly sawed out.



The two sheets were silver soldered together, the solder being fed into the lip formed between the sheets until the top sheet floated on the solder.



The now thicker sheet was machined to size.



Next a shoulder to locate the cylinder was need to be turned in the centre of the brass sheet. This was done using a shellac chuck, first a centre drill was used to drill a hole in the centre of the sheet. A shellac chuck was charged with shellac and the brass sheet placed on it as close to centre as possible by eye. When the shellac became mastic a glove was used to put the still very warm chuck in the lathe, the work piece was moved until a centre could be pushed into it. When located the chuck was revolved by hand a few times so centring the work piece. This system is remarkable accurate.



When cold because of the intermittent cutting a thrust plate was used to support the work piece while turning.



The thrust plate was removed for the final cuts to fit the cylinder.



End of play yesterday.




Regards Tony.
 

Tony Bird

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Hi,

With some domestic engineering and another project I didn't get much done on the beam engine yesterday. The bottom of the cylinder cover was reassessed for clearance and the cylinder was drilled and tapped to hold it.





Regards Tony.
 

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