Another Flame Licker Plan

Discussion in 'Plans' started by rake60, Jul 15, 2007.

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  1. Jul 15, 2007 #1

    rake60

    rake60

    rake60

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    I've seen pictures of this Flame Licker design a few places and I've been
    searching for the plans.
    [​IMG]
    It seems a young man re-drew the plan as a high school drafting project.
    He posted his work on his web site at:
    http://www.anthonydavies.org/inv1.html
    Another one on the things to build list.......
     
  2. Jul 19, 2007 #2

    shred

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    That one is the one by Phillip Duclos and documented in "Steam and Stirling Engines You Can Build, Vol 1"
     
  3. Jul 20, 2007 #3

    rake60

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  4. Jul 20, 2007 #4

    shred

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    Crud. It's actually in Book 2. On the cover even. :oops: Hopefully you figured that out.
     
  5. Jul 20, 2007 #5

    rake60

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    I'm a machinist, I always look at the pictures. :wink:
    Volume 1 does look like an interesting book too!
     
  6. Jul 21, 2007 #6

    Alex

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    Thanks for the tip on the book. Got to have a copy of it, or them ;)
     
  7. Jul 21, 2007 #7

    Airhead

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    That engine is also in "The Shop Wisdom of Philip Duclos" published by Vallage Press. A book I can highly recomend.

    Rick
     
  8. Oct 18, 2007 #8

    cfellows

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    This engine is also featured as a three part article in Live Steam Magazine, Oct-Nov-Dec 1990.

    Chuck
     
  9. Oct 19, 2007 #9

    rake60

    rake60

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    I keep looking at these plans....
    That damn cam keeps putting me off.
    If it ever hits the work bench the cam will be the first part made.
    (Just in case I can't!. LOL) Every plan I've come up with for cutting the
    the groove in the side of the cam brings visions of exposed thumb bones.
    I'll keep working on a better plan....

    Rick
     
  10. Oct 19, 2007 #10

    wareagle

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    Rick,

    I may not be "seeing" this clearly :? , but looking at the cam, why couldn't one cut the groove and holes in a .250 plate (mounted on a expendible plate), then machine the profile out of the remaining part? This way, there would be plenty of material to clamp, and would also have the ability to move the piece around to get the radiuses cut for the profile using a rotary table. After it is cut, it would be simple to clean up.

    I may have this totally wrong, and if so please correct me.
     
  11. Oct 19, 2007 #11
    The way I see for making the cam is to use a small billet of round bar. The centre hole and main OD can be done on the lathe first, then transfer to the RT to profile it and cut the slot, then a bit of hand filing to blend it all together, then just part it off on the lathe. The cam just doesn't look very critical, just hi and lo profiles with a smooth transitional blend, in fact the low point face could most probably be filed completely by hand, once you have it to the right thickness for the throw.
    Having had a quick look at the drawings supplied by the young man, there are quite a few mis-dimensioned parts so you would need to be careful on your planning for the job and double check the parts fit and tolerances plus throws first before making any parts from the drawing.

    John
     
  12. Dec 14, 2007 #12

    kustomkb

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  13. Dec 14, 2007 #13

    rake60

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    Very Nicely Done!

    Welcome to HMEM!

    Rick
     
  14. Dec 14, 2007 #14

    wareagle

    wareagle

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    kustomkb, very nice engine you have there. Welcome aboard and make yourself at home.
     
  15. Dec 15, 2007 #15

    dparker

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    Hello All: This engine is much the same as the one in Popular Science in 1950 and 1959. the plans were printed in the 1950 February Popular Science issue on page starting 206. I bought the casting kit and plans for $11.00 from Genrex, Inc. 77 greenwood Ave., Midland Park, New Jersey. Prices have changed since then. Mine is a good runner but I built a hood to go over the valve to direct the flame to the port better. It takes a little while for the casting to warm up enough to run and you want to use light oil on all moving parts.

    [​IMG]
    Don
     
  16. Dec 15, 2007 #16
    kustomkb,
    Nice work on your engine, welcome to our site and enjoy your stay.

    Don,
    Nice one (but showing your age a bit with all the info).
    Great to see it actually in a used condition, my boxer one now is almost black with all the running I have given it. When I spy it on my bench, I just can't resist giving it a ten minute run.

    John
     
  17. Dec 16, 2007 #17

    Sprocket

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    Rake
    As is typical of most of his models, if there is a part that is challenging to machine, Philip Duclos gives a clear explanation and pictures in the article. If you are getting that book, I think it will all be clear. My first engine was a "Maverick" and the cam and governor are on opposite sides of the same disc, and was fairly intimidating. (I'm not a machinist) but the instructions were good, and I got it fairly easily. He wrote great instructions, with excellent photography. "The Shop Wisdom of Philip Duclos" and
    "Two Shop Masters" have most, if not all of what he published through Village Press. I've enjoyed those books. Have a few more engines I'd like to build from them.
    Doug
     
  18. Dec 27, 2007 #18

    Mcgyver

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    Don, neat pic, nice to to see the heritage on this one. I too am building one, got tired of all the longer projects, and pushed them to the back; time for a fun little novelty engine the kids can see work, while they're still kids :D hope to have have it going in a day or two. Rick, the cam (would have taken pics if I'd read this thread 10 hours ago) is a piece of cake if you have a rotary table. Phil's article (also reprinted in one of the steam and stirling books) explains it in detail, or i can run through it when you're ready. as John says, easiest if you turn it on the end of a 1" bar, transfer to a vice sitting on the RT then part off.

    John, were the errors on the plans by the kid or VP? I hope i don't have to remake any stuff i was really hoping to minimize the brain damage and just by rote follow a set of plans. Come to think of it, is ok web publishing the plans given they are commercially for sale via VP - looks like a pretty direct copy?
     
  19. Jan 7, 2008 #19
    Sorry it's a bit late Mcgyver, forgot all about this question.

    I only had a quick look over the kids plans and noticed straight away a couple of errors, can't remember what they were, but they were fairly obvious, so really everything on the plans need to be gone thru just to see if the bits fit onto the matching parts. Could save a bit of heartache in the long run.

    John
     
  20. Jan 17, 2008 #20

    b.lindsey

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    I know this thread hasn't been posted to in a while. Just wanted to second the comments by others as to the ease of making the cam given Phillip Duclos' very clear instructions. This was the first cam I had ever tried to make and it was not difficult at all. Far more critical in this engine is the piston to cylinder wall fit...too tight and it robs too much of the power...too loose and it will try to run but won't sustain itself. At least this was my experience. I think I ended up making the piston twice if not three times. Once that was right however it ran and continues to run like a champ. I have seen others that have used graphite for the piston instead of steel and this may be a better alternative for self-lubrication and less prone to expansion from heat after longer running times. One of these days I will probably do that to mine.

    Bill
     

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