Allen Wrenches

Discussion in 'Tools' started by rake60, Mar 10, 2012.

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  1. Mar 11, 2012 #21

    Maryak

    Maryak

    Maryak

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    Not usually, sometimes pipe wrench but more often stillson. Of course the usual disclaimer that's just my take on it. ::)

    [​IMG]

    And D spanner

    [​IMG]

    Best Regards
    Bob
     
  2. Mar 11, 2012 #22

    rake60

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    According to the manufacturer of the Chinese lathe purchased from Enco,
    a "Crecsent Wrench" is a "Monkey Wrench".

    To me, THIS is a "Monkey Wrench".

    [​IMG]

    It isn't really a pipe wrench with flat jaws on both side.

    Who knows! :shrug:

    Rick
     
  3. Mar 11, 2012 #23

    tel

    tel

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    Nah, that's a Stillson!

    And Tin's channel locks are multigrips.

    Very few wrenches down here, but plenty of spanners, AND more than a few wenches if you are still fast enough.
     
  4. Mar 11, 2012 #24

    Maryak

    Maryak

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    Hard to find one with nice teeth ;D

    Best Regards
    Bob
     
  5. Mar 11, 2012 #25

    Tin Falcon

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    Diamond Auto Wrenches
    Also known as: Ford Wrench and Monkey Wrench

    Manufactured by Crescent Tool go figure. So is this too a Cresent wrench ?

    [​IMG]

    Rick what you are showing is a pipe wrench.

    [​IMG]

    this is a crescent wrench.
    Tin
     
  6. Mar 11, 2012 #26

    tel

    tel

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    Ah yes! That's also what I know as a monkey wrench.

    Interesting tho' - here it is always shifting spanner or monkey wrench - which is about the only wrench we have.
     
  7. Mar 12, 2012 #27

    steamer

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    Well, that I would call a "Stilson" wrench. The Monkey wrench is the one that Tin illustrates first in his post.

    The "Stilson" jaw articulates to grip the pipe while the Monkey wrench jaw does not.
     
  8. Mar 12, 2012 #28

    Mosey

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    According to Wikipedia, the you are holding just below is a Stilson or Monkey wrench, and it is for soft pipe as it tightens up when you rock it aginst the fitting. I call it a pipe wrench or monkey wrench.
     
  9. Mar 12, 2012 #29

    Tin Falcon

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    The folks that write up Wikipedia probably do not dirty there hands with tools. I do not always trust what is said on how things are made or posted to Wikipedia just one persons view.They are trying to get the basics across and loose details sometimes important ones.
    I can see they look similar enough that folks would get them confused. Different tools different uses one for pipe one for large nuts and bolts.
    One can and I have gripped large nuts with a pipe wrench but a monkey wrench is useless for pipe.
    My view for what it is worth.
    The main thing is understand how tools are used and intended purpose. Ie use the right tool for the the job. or at least the best you have on hand.
    Tin
     
  10. Mar 12, 2012 #30

    lazylathe

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    Where i come from we have spanners and not wrenches.
    The only wrench i know is a monkey wrench or more correctly known as a bobbejaan spanner!!! :big:

    It must be true if it is in Wikipedia: :big:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pipe_wrench

    When i talk to some people and talk about " throwing a spanner in the works" i get a lot of confused looks... ;D

    Andrew
     
  11. Mar 12, 2012 #31

    arnoldb

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    :big: Andrew stole the words from my mouth...

    A bobbejaan spanner is a most useful tool; if nothing else is around it can do pipe work, tighten or loosen bolts with rounded-over heads, and be used as a hammer ;D

    We call a crescent wrench a "shifting spanner" - used to round over bolt heads so one can get to play with "vise grips" or the bobejaan spanner ;D

    What Tin referred to as "Channel Locks" we tend to call "water pump pliers" in the southern parts of Africa.

    The self locking wrench/mole grips we cal vise grips :big:

    Now, that's some more spanners in the works ;)

    Kind regards, Arnold
     
  12. Mar 12, 2012 #32

    tornitore45

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    Channel Lock in Italy are call Papagallo (Parrot), it looks like one to me.
     
  13. Apr 18, 2012 #33

    max corrigan

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    Dave back in my apprenticeship days, the original mole grip was called an "elmo grip" it did'nt have the release lever, later using the same lettering it was changed to mole with the release lever,these grips when closed would get your hand caught, if you were not careful, had many a painful "black mans pinch" from these!
    these mole grips were never in the same street as the original US "vise grips" in my opinion
    Regards Max.....
     
  14. Apr 18, 2012 #34

    Xlmyford

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    Hello.
    The name "Inbus",which is used for socket head cap screws in Germany as well,is the acronym for
    (In)nensechskantschraube (B)auer (u)nd (S)chaurte.Bauer und Schaurte is a company.
    The correct German name is Innensechskantschraube.
    Over the years the name "Inbusschlüssel" ("schlüssel"means key in German) had become synonym for the wrench,similar thing happened in the US.
    Everyone knows an Allen key,which is synonym for a hex key.
    If you ask me,my Allen keys,like the most of my tools,metric and imperial,are made by Stahlwille,
    Genuine made in Germany.Almost indestructible.

    Cheers,Ralph
     
  15. Apr 18, 2012 #35

    Holt

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    I can imagine that Inbus is used in all German speaking countries (that would be Germany, Austria and Switzerland i guess) I saw them named Inbus on the drawers of a big tool cabinet in the workshop at the former LEGO factory Willisau Switzerland, where i have been send to alter machines from time to time, back in the days working at LEGO Denmark machine workshop

    Holt
     

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