Used Myford ML7 versus Seig/Craftex CX700

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Anyone wish to offer an opinion on whether or not an old Myford ML7 without the gearbox is better than a new craftex CX700.

Are accessories for the ML7 readily available in Canada? I am looking at a used ML7 that has zero in the way of accessories, basically the 3 jaw chuck and thats it.... It is listed for more money than brand new 10x22 lathe.

I know British quality and all that, but fear lack of accessories. I also lack skill to fully utilize really accurate machine.

Thoughts...
 

Goldflash

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About 2 years ago my Father Gave me his super 7 that he purchased around about 1975 . It came complete with just about every Myford Accessory. There is a bit of wear on the Bed at the Chuck end and it could do with the spindle bearings being replaced at one stage. This lathe served him well for making steam engines and clocks and hot air engines and I used if for making parts over the years such as valve guides to an rear Axle for a BMW R100. A very versatile machine that is part of the family. However now faced with the choice of Low Budget Asian made lathes and Availability of complimentary milling machines I dont know if I would stick to the Myford.
Would I sell it . Hell no. would I buy one ? only if the price was really attractive and it had most of the basic accessories including the vertical slide ( For Basic Milling ).
PS Dad is a few months of a 100 and it was model engineering that has kept him as sharp as Pin.
 

goldstar31

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As the owner of a Super7B I would issue a word of caution about what is likely to be a very old machine.
I'd be very suspicious about one which came with only a three jaw chuck. As for accessories, they are available from the UK but if there is a problem in the spindle bearings of a ML7, you will be in really serious costs as I believe the original Glacier bearings are no longer supplied.
It's all a question of how it measures up--now.
 

hacklordsniper

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I do have an principle which i use all the time, anything new is better than anything old. Al trough many old lathes can stand by modern Chinese lathes with better quality and precision i would always choose a new Chinese lathe. I like to have my machines first and to be only person to play with it from beginning, not worrying about what is broken and what is on end of lifespan.
 

RManley

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Whereas I would always go for an old machine. A friend bought a Warco lathe and had to re-machine the saddle so it sat flat on the bed, the underside of the tailstock so that it sat flat and didnt rock on its adjustment screws and adjust the spindle amongst various other things.

I would look at an old machine and say that it was made right in the first place so getting it right again isnt going to be too difficult. A new machine I would cosnsider to be a nice set of castings but expext to play with it for a long time and never truly be happy.

I recently bought a new seig mill. On the list I have to: throw away the tapered gib stips as they dont match the taper of the saddle or the z axis slide and they are also bent to hide the fact they are not doing their job properly, and machine up some proper parallel gibs with adjusting screws. The column is not standing vertical so I have had to shim it (quite a lot). The slots in the table are not consistant width along their length and are different between the three slots so they will have to be re-machined. There are other minor things that will get done over time.

All I can say is, if you want a decent new machine you will be paying lots, if you want a cheap new machine, make sure you have a friend with a large (old) mill to get it right.

My ml7 was sold in 1957 and has served me proud for 8 years doing tiny stuff upto 7" dia cast iron without complaining.

Rob. :)
 

hacklordsniper

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I agree, all of my instruments, tools, and machines (new & Chinese) were something like a "kit". You get all the parts, assembled and somewhat tested but you need to finish, tune and build it to compare to expensive product (thats somewhat sweet and i like it).
 

deverett

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I use British machines and am lucky to have a Myford S7 and a Harrison M300. Both have just about all the accessories that I will ever need.

There are the protagonists for both used and new machines and there are arguments for buying each type. One of the advantages of buying used is that the machine should come with lots of accessories. I would not have any problem buying used if I could be certain of previous ownership use. You should be able to try out a used machine in workshop conditions.

In this case, I would not be inclined to go for the Myford. As you are in Canada, perhaps a South Bend or Atlas may be a better proposition. Time spent looking for one could well pay dividends in the long run. One other possible idea is to look for a used Chinese machine that has been sorted by a previous hobby owner.

There are several Yahoo groups devoted to the various Asian machines with loads of advice and suggestions for improvements.

You pays your money and takes your choice.

Dave
The Emerald Isle
 
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Thank you all for the feedback. It is very much appreciated and has helped me come to my decision.
 

lensman57

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Anyone wish to offer an opinion on whether or not an old Myford ML7 without the gearbox is better than a new craftex CX700.

Are accessories for the ML7 readily available in Canada? I am looking at a used ML7 that has zero in the way of accessories, basically the 3 jaw chuck and thats it.... It is listed for more money than brand new 10x22 lathe.

I know British quality and all that, but fear lack of accessories. I also lack skill to fully utilize really accurate machine.

Thoughts...
Hi,

I have one these Old ML7 lathes. I will put it very straight to you and you make the decision. If the Myford is going to be your only lathe then forget it. The parent company went out of buisness July two years ago , someone bought the rights to the Myford brand in the UK and some of the left over stock and tooling. Most of the stuff on offer and advertised as "Myford New" are made in the far east or somewhere else and are not British made, just marketed as Myford. The old ML7 lathe that I have is from 1949, almost worn out but still kicking. I would draw a comparision between the lathe and a classic car, you'd spend most of the year looking after it, oil it polish it and adjust it so you could take it out on a couple of sunny days and show it off, good for a hobby not so good for serious work. If your budget stretches to a super 7 or super 7B in top condition, assuming that you found one, and with all the original tooling then go for it but expect to pay an arm and a leg and something else on the top , as for ML7 it is a case of a project in itself, a labour of love and money. BTW I really do not like the Chinese lathes but they are good value.

Regards,

A.G
 

don-tucker

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Without doubt ,the ML7,I wouldn't be without mine,a lovely lovely machine and I have been around a few,my brother has had his myford Drummond for 60 years and still going strong.
Don
 

lensman57

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Without doubt ,the ML7,I wouldn't be without mine,a lovely lovely machine and I have been around a few,my brother has had his myford Drummond for 60 years and still going strong.
Don
Hi,

I really like My ML7 too, I am getting it sorted out little by little. There is something fudamentally right and organic about the feel of the lathe. Once it is sorted it will be great tool again.

Regards,

A.G
 
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Without doubt ,the ML7,I wouldn't be without mine,a lovely lovely machine and I have been around a few,my brother has had his myford Drummond for 60 years and still going strong.
Don
Sorry, I am unsure Don, but you are located in the UK if I am not mistaken... if that is the case do you think the prevalence of Myford's in the UK plays any influence, or conversely if you were overseas would the scarcity of myford lathes and parts influence you towards the other side or the argument?

I know I couldn't get by with 1 three jaw chuck and a 1/2 drill chuck and an oil pump... after looking I haven't found a source of myford parts and accessories in North America.
 

canadianhorsepower

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i think that any lathe when set properly will do the job
if you treat it wright. I had some Astlas, Craftex,Smithy, and Taig
and I had fun with all of them. I must admit I dont over do it.
Example, never broke a parting tool in 35 years
my 2 centswoohoo1
 

ian99

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Torontobuilder, I live in Richmond Hill and have gone through similar degrees of navel gazing. However the main issue seems to be price.

1. Busy Bee has the Craftex CX700 10x22 at C$1799 and it comes with lots of accessories including a 4 jaw chuck.

2. A bare used ML7 should go for about $1,000 in today’s market.

3. Accessories for the ML7 are readily available but only from the UK. That is not really a problem other than their initial price, freight, duty and tax. There are lots of manic Myford users in the UK that keep the brand alive. This machine is quite capable but has a cult following that tends to obscure clear thinking, however it also helps to spawn a huge amount of support within user groups, accessory manufacturers and accessory designs (ie. Plans for many things are available on the web for you to build).

4. As a Scot, I suggest that English quality is vastly over-rated. The ML7 was built post WW2 with pre war design philosophy – heavy iron castings and the ability to adjust/fettle everything in sight. This can be a source of pure joy or pure frustration depending upon your approach to life.

5. The ML7 is a useful size – 7x20 with a 10” swing over the gap if you have a slim 4 jaw chuck or plate. It has the very useful characteristic of being simple in its construction. You can pull everything apart, clean it, adjust it, and put it together again. The Craftex products are much more difficult especially the power train.

6. I have gone through a Sieg C2 7x12, an SB9, and now the ML7. The C2 was way too small for my hands and was a pain to keep adjusted. The SB9 was big, basic, unexciting American. The ML7 is like my old MG – lots of fun but not to be stressed too much.

7. If I have another lathe, it will be something larger and heavier – in Canada the Standard-Modern is readily available, or the Logan.

8. Everything depends upon what your expected use is for the lathe. To me, the Craftex is like a new toy and not a production machine. However the ML7 is like a very old production machine for a small workshop. Either will produce parts for small engine models. Neither will work for long production runs.

9. To return to the original questions: Firstly, Yes Myford parts are readily available (but from the UK). Secondly, a ML7 at a CX700 price is grossly overpriced.
 
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