WW1 Death penny help

Discussion in 'The Break Room' started by JCSteam, Aug 24, 2017.

  1. Aug 24, 2017 #1

    JCSteam

    JCSteam

    JCSteam

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    While moving the shed for setting the ML4 lathe up we came across a bronze disc. Researching the disc and the inscription on it came up with the name "Death penny" which was given out to the families of servicemen who lost their lives in WW1. We are trying currently to retrace the bloodline to give the plaque back to the family it belongs. On the penny/plaque is the name Harry Wright. Looking at other plaques they seem accurate in naming the individuals full name, middle names included. (This makes me sad and angry that an item that was presented to honour the life of a man is been sold on ebay)

    Searching the common wealth records, show only 5 servicemen that were H Wright or Harry Wright.

    Of these five servicemen one was with the 1st/4th East Yorkshire Regiment, and his grave can be found in Newcastle. The other four appear to have no links to the north east. (This was found in Darlington England)

    His grave records show his father as F.J.Wright of Albert dock hull. Research into this name has found a Frederick James Wright, born 1873, there is also a service record for this man, but we can't access it without paying. On the census Frederick James Wright's ococcupation is Dock Gateman at Albert docks Hull. Who was married at Holy Trinity Church, to Sarah Wright. They went on to have five children, one of whom was Harry Wright, who has the correct date of birth of Private H Wright. The others four children been Helen, George, Edith, and William.

    Hull WW1 records show that he was born and died at home. Residence in 1901 was listed on the census as Goshen Place, Kingston upon Hull. Though this street doesn't exist on modern maps. It has been demolished and redeveloped over time.

    We think we have possibly found his Brothers Grave, George Wright, at chester-le-Street cemetery, but would need to visit as there is no photo on line of George's head stone.

    If anyone is on the websites for ancestry then we would appreciate some help please. If the rightful owners cannot be found then this will be passed to either Beamish museum, or Hull WW1 museum.

    Thanks in advance of any help on this

    20170819_202205.jpg
     
  2. Aug 24, 2017 #2

    kiwi2

    kiwi2

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  3. Aug 24, 2017 #3

    goldstar31

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    I've been at something vaguely similar in recalling with honour the deaths of three airmen. Again, I was recently down at United Grand Lodge for the Victoria Cross ceremony of Masonic Victoria Cross holders who fell in WW1.

    This coming weekend is a 'free access' to Genes United and this may help your quest.

    My thoughts - for what they are, are to ask the local press if they can help. I got tremendous help and it all ended up with a massive 'do' at the Metropolitan Police College in Hendon with the Queens Pilot, the RAF 31 Squadron Association and the sisters of two aircrew and the pilot's girl friend. The gap was exactly 50 years!

    Again, there must be records on a War Memorial which will give a Service Number and I know that a lady involved in Northumberland and Durham on War Memorials. Maybe the Royal British Legion can point you in the right direction.

    If you get 'stuck', please drop me a line and I'll unearth some of my 'contacts'

    So 'I greet you well'

    Norm
     
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  4. Aug 24, 2017 #4

    goldstar31

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    H Wright's name appears as RHA/RFA on Darlington Town's War Memorial.

    So we have got somewhere as a soldier in the Royal Horse Artillery/Royal Field Artillery.

    Again, there is a North East War Memorial project in existence.

    So you have establish two things
    whether the coin is a fake and if genuine, what the Royal Artillery records might show.

    Norm
     
  5. Aug 24, 2017 #5

    JCSteam

    JCSteam

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    Sounds a great story :)

    We have What we believe to be his badge and I'D number. Also his service number we are looking to progress through time to find decendants of Harry. To return this to them. However Harry died just 17, ( a sad truth to WW1) so is very unlikely that he had any children. So we are focusing on his Brothers and sister to find the bloodline.
     
  6. Aug 24, 2017 #6

    JCSteam

    JCSteam

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    It genuine. On the reverse is marked a WA where the A sits inside the W. This was because the penny manufacture was switched to Woolich arsenal after the war. There is the name of the designer behind the hind leg of the lion onto the front casting and also a 73 cast or stampwd into the coin. This tallys with 1073/2D which was his badge and design no.
     
  7. Aug 24, 2017 #7

    JCSteam

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    Hi we have searched the War graves commission records. If the Harry Wright we have been searching is correct then the info posted at the beginning of this topic is what we have discovered so far.
     
  8. Aug 24, 2017 #8

    mcostello

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    It is amazing how much was thought of this Man's sacrifice that they made a coin for His posterity. It is also amazing how little is made of the today's People's ultimate sacrifice.
     
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  9. Aug 24, 2017 #9

    JCSteam

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    The Penny, (nickname as they resembled the penny of the day) was given to every servicemans next of kin who lost their lives on the front line, or due to their injuries. There were thousands made in two separate factories. The one we have been made at Woolwich arsenal, after the war ended. The loss of life in WW1 was unprecedented, and something that should have been learnt from!
     
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