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Wizard lathe restoration

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BaronJ

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Here is snother attempt at a tangential tool holder.
I think this one is more acceptable. However there is a mistake, the screw is on the opposite side :-(

View attachment 119492
Don't worry about the screw, as long as you can get at it to tighten it its fine. Anyway this is a much better attempt than the previous one.

In answer to your question, yes that was the reason for the shallow "V", the idea was that all you would need to do to sharpen the cutter would be to lay the tool on its side and use the slope as a guide against the side of the grinding wheel.
 

goldstar31

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Jon
I studied 'Pelmanism' and iI can 'see' a little lathe with rotary table:)

As for motors, we always used 1440rom Quarter horse motors from old washing machines. There should still be one in the garage loft.
Writing about motors- I'm going off the top of my head but it's Year 1953 and by Martin Cleeve and he used both a ONE horse motor and a smaller one- on line shafting.
Cleeve bought a new ML7 but with NO motor-- and seemingly it replaced his ML4.
I'm going off my memory yet again and his ML7 had a non standard i.e homemade 127 transposing gear that was NOT the Myford normal 20DP gears. If a 127 toot gear of 20DP was used, it would foul the drip tray:):):)
Oddly I still have the Cleeve rear Parting tool holder made from 3 bit of mild steel and also his swing tool boring tool- which appeared in ????? Popular Mechanics. The tool post was in 'Turrets without milling' in ME.
I'll be curious to learn how the old grey matter is holding out------?


Norman

PS
Somewhere I appear at my old address in ME's PostBag.
 
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modeng2000

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JCSteam, many thanks for your input, I do think that with a more powerful motor setup things would be much better. Turning small diameters is not a problem but anything more than say a couple of centimeters in diameter really loads the lathe and progress becomes very slow. My flycutting was better probably because an intermittant cut gives time for the speed to keep up.

Another problem is having bearings that need to be oiled means that oil droplets are thrown off from the bearing area and it is wise to stay out of the line of fire.

Regards, John
 

goldstar31

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I think that you are missing a couple of points.

Firstly, all this restriction suggested about power of motors is wrong. within reason, the bigger the motor the better. If you follow one worker, he had TWO motors for his ML7 and one was a full horsepower.

Seemingly, he made a substantial income screwcutting after he was kicked out of his chosen job!
There are endless permutations for good but inexpensive motors. I have a bloody big and heavy motor on my tool and cutter grinder which is doing the same job as the one that I gave to BaronJ which was a 2880rpm 1/6th HP one. The cost of mine on the Clarkson was all of £25! My Quorn originally ran on a 1/4 horse motor that cost nothing as I took it out od a scrap washing machine. I;ve still got it somewhere and before all that, it powdered several lathes- and one was a Zyto very similar to yours.
Again, as for flinging oil from a spindle, I hate to tell you how much I paid for a rather posh Myford- and it flings out oil tpo everything and person - in the four Northern Counties!
If you want an oil free lathe, buy a Chinese one but- once it runs, the cutting fluid with centrifuge- like my Myford Super & with gear box, power cross feed -painted a bilious shade of green and will need a mortgage if you want it!

Think it out, plese

Norman
 

modeng2000

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Hi norman, I too have had a face full of cutting oil but oil from a bearing is a new experience!
I do agree with you about the motors. I'm used to induction motors and their constant speed but when needs must I'll use what ever seems best if it is to hand.

A little thinking time now to take stock of the situation..

John
 

BaronJ

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Hi norman, I too have had a face full of cutting oil but oil from a bearing is a new experience!
I do agree with you about the motors. I'm used to induction motors and their constant speed but when needs must I'll use what ever seems best if it is to hand.

A little thinking time now to take stock of the situation..

John
Hi Guys,

You should see the white painted wall behind my Myford ! And my white dust coats. It looks like someone has drawn a broad black line with a spray can. The really annoying thing is you cannot paint over it !
 

JCSteam

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John,

I'm afraid there isn't anything that can be done about the spray of oil, if the bearings are adjusted correctly, the effect will be minimised. However the flow of oil through the "total loss" plain bearings is essential for maintaining lubrication to the spindle. Grease is not an option, although it would not be flung from the spindle, at the high speeds of the spindle the grease would soon loose it's ability to lubricate, also it would act as a collector of tiny dust turning it into a nice grinding paste.
Put up with a little spray of oil, it's part and parcel of the plain bearings.
Regards
Jon
 

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