Will this CNC machine do it for making a scale v8?

Discussion in 'CNC Machines and Conversions' started by Dikker, Sep 27, 2015.

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  1. Sep 27, 2015 #1

    Dikker

    Dikker

    Dikker

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    Hello HMEM, my name is Mikael and i'm 19 years old, and dream about some day becoming an engineer in the racing world. So i was thinking about starting with some model engines, but i haven't found any CNC in my price range, except for the Pocket NC, which still isn't come out yet, but hopefully soon. And since im new to this world, i don't know i the Pocket NC is precise enough.
    Back to buissnes, will the Pocket NC be precise enough for making ANY part in a scale V8? And here is the link for the engine i would like to build :http://ministeam.com/acatalog/conley-models.html !!!NOTE!!: IT IS NOT THE CONLEY WANT TO BUILD! IT IS THE DEMON V8!

    (Sorry for my bad English!!)
    (Link: http://www.pocketnc.com/ )
    Here are the specs:

    X Axis
    Max Speed: 40 ipm (inches per minute)
    Resolution: 0.000125in
    Backlash at 100% load : 0.003in
    Max Travel: 4.5 in
    Homing Repeatability: - +/-0.0005 in
    Repeatability: +/-0.002 in at 0% load

    Y Axis
    Max Speed: 40 ipm (inches per minute)
    Resolution: 0.000125 in
    Backlash at 100% load : 0.003 in
    Max Travel: 4.8 in
    Homing Repeatability: - +/-0.0005 in
    Repeatability: +/-0.002 in at 0% load

    Z Axis
    Max Speed: 40 ipm (inches per minute)
    Resolution: 0.000125in
    Backlash at 100% load : 0.003in
    Max Travel: 3.3 in
    Homing Repeatability: - +/-0.0005 in
    Repeatability: +/-0.002 in at 0% load

    A Axis
    Max Speed: 20 degrees/second
    Resolution: 0.025 degrees
    Backlash at 100% load : 0.05 degrees
    Max Travel: 100 degrees (90 degrees +/- 5 degrees)
    Homing Repeatability: - +/-0.05 degrees
    Repeatability: +/-0.05 degrees at 0% load

    B Axis
    Max Speed: 40 degrees/second
    Resolution: 0.025 degrees
    Backlash at 100% load : 0.05 degrees
    Max Travel: continuous rotation
    Homing Repeatability: - +/-0.05 degrees
    Repeatability: +/-0.05 degrees at 0% load
     
  2. Sep 27, 2015 #2

    Tin Falcon

    Tin Falcon

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    while building a v8 is an admirable and attainable goal make sure you can stand and walk before you try to run.

    My suggestion is you learn basic machining like layout measuring and manual lathe and milling operations before thinking about buying a cnc.
    And if you truly want to be an engineer you should be enrolled in college and have access to there machine shop and prototype labs.

    If you have not done so go to the MIT website http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/142-machine-shop-1
    And spend a day watching there videos.
    it will give a good idea of machine tools.
    Also download a copy of army tcto 9-524

    Armt TCTO 9-524


    Buy a small manual lathe and learn to use it . If you really want a CNC machine digital machinist has a convention/seminar every year in Michigan sign up for the build work shop and you walk away with a cnc mill that you built with a little help. IIRC it cost around $2500 -$3000 for the week.

    Start by building a couple compressed air engines. Then build a single cylinder gas engine like a dick Upshur farm engine then think about a v8.

    Unless you grew up in a machine shop you have a lot to learn before starting something like a V-8.
    Tin
     
    dalem9 likes this.
  3. Sep 27, 2015 #3

    Dikker

    Dikker

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    Thank you very much Tin Falcon for your reply, was also included in my plans, purchasing a lathe, and a bench drill (srry, i don't know what it's really called in English. Also, i'm not from the US, and there are still going to be around 1 year before i can start in college, because in my country basic training in the military is mandatory, as soon as men is over 18 )

    I really appreciate you're suggestions, but wasn't my question (don't wan't to come of as a dick, my English is a but rough) When the time comes some day, will the CNC be precise enough? Also, i would also like to build other stuff with that CNC machine some day.

    Again, sorry for my bad English, don't wan't to sound like a dick, don't wan't to offend anyone :)
     
  4. Sep 27, 2015 #4

    Jasonb

    Jasonb

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    As the block of the Demon is 4.53in long your mill is unlikely to be big enough as the specification says X travel is 4.500in
     
  5. Sep 27, 2015 #5

    Dave Sohlstrom

    Dave Sohlstrom

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    In a word NO that machine is not a good choice for what you would someday like to do. It is too small and light duty. For it's size it is over priced.

    For building engines you do a lot of lathe work. If you are in a Euro country there are a lot of small manual metal lathes available. Get one and learn to make good parts on it.

    You can also get good small manual vertical milling machines. Get one of those also. You can get both machines for the price of 1 pocket mill.

    Once you have some machining time under your belt then think about CNC. Remember that with CNC you will need good CAD program and skills. A CNC mill is of little use without a good CAM program that you can take you CAD drawings and turn into Gcode for the CNC machine.

    All of this is not cheap so start saving now.

    If you want a good CNC milling machine that is aimed at the hobby machinist then take a look at the new Tormach 440 CNC mill.

    http://www.tormach.com/product-pcnc-440.html

    The machine is the lowest cost of the 3 CNC mills that Tormach offers. There is also a CNC lathe but you better be sitting down when you see the price of it.

    Hope this helps

    Dave
     
  6. Sep 27, 2015 #6

    Tin Falcon

    Tin Falcon

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    You are correct I should have answered your question.
    And as Dave pointed out . the answer is NO it is pretty much a small underpowered toy. limited to tiny parts.

    No need to apologize about your english.

    As far as your current plans to start with manual machines and needing to wait for college due to military requirements thanks for the clarification.
    I would help us all if you post an introduction in the welcome sub fora.

    It really helps us if to know alittle about you and where in the world you are

    We are not mind readers we only know you by what you tell us especially on your first couple of posts.

    Tin
     
  7. Sep 27, 2015 #7

    Dikker

    Dikker

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    Thanks for the answers, both of you :)


    Already looked for some small lathes, even some perfect size-wise (and money wise)
    some questions tho, do you have any plans for any compressed air engines? Or just any good beginner engines? And is it best if i get the vertical milling and lathe machine seperately? I have looked for some, and i could get some, where it is combined, and wouldn't that be 4 axis?? (don't know if that term only applies to CNC) And one last, looked at the Tormach mills, will 4 axis do the job one day? Creating any part for model engines? anything from inline 4 cylinder, to ??W10??
     
  8. Sep 27, 2015 #8

    Dikker

    Dikker

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    Tin: Where do i enter quick information? Couldn't seem to find it?
    Though there a still a bit of time before i need to do basic training in the military, my plans are to get started as fast as possible, already have a lathe i can do work on, so only need some plans.
    And thank you for you're nice welcome to the forum :)
     
  9. Sep 27, 2015 #9

    Tin Falcon

    Tin Falcon

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  10. Sep 27, 2015 #10

    Tin Falcon

    Tin Falcon

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    If you click on your account "My account" it will open a drop down menu . About 3/4 the way down there is an option to add edit personal information .
    Tin
     
  11. Mar 23, 2016 #11

    hanermo3

    hanermo3

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    As others said, the machine is a toy, and inaccurate.

    Get a 10x lathe, second hand, circa 500-1000$.
    Age does not matter.
    Heavier is better.

    And it takes up very little space, makes less noise than smaller ones, and is a very good tool for little money.
    A "toy" 2x16 minilathe takes up almost the same space (maybe 10 cm difference), but the 10x will be 5x more accurate and much more productive.
     
  12. Mar 23, 2016 #12

    xpylonracer

    xpylonracer

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    The CNC x4-800 doesn't look like the type of machine I would recommend to someone wanting to build a V8 or any other model engine, just not fit for that purpose.

    Emgee
     
  13. Mar 23, 2016 #13

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

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    Rather than diving in at the deep end, and looking at things logically in the harsh light of day, maybe there is another route to go along as you are still very inexperienced in machining.

    Buy a medium sized lathe, maybe a 10" throw, and a medium sized hobby mill, say a Sieg X2.

    Once you have experience of manually using both, then using the machines themselves, plus some retailer bought items, convert your mill to CNC ( there is lots of help online in converting the X2 to CNC).

    Doing it that way, not only will you get your experience, but you will spread the cost over a longer period.

    John
     

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