Why a forum on disabilities?

Discussion in 'Machining with Disabilities' started by GailInNM, Nov 15, 2008.

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  1. Feb 19, 2017 #101

    Blogwitch

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    Hi Pigpen,

    I now have two high receptionists chairs, I used to have four, but I found I can scoot about between machines without having to stand up, so a couple were given away to friends.

    There are lots of ways for us to carry on in our shops, I myself have power feeds on everything except the topslide on my lathe, but because that is only for short work I can still cope with it.

    I have digital hearing aids and have found that a good technician can set them up to eliminate almost all the Tinnitus problems to give me nice full range hearing while I am wearing them. My problems start when I take them out and try listening to the TV in the evening, I have to turn the sound right up to be able to pick things up fully. Luckily, my neighbours can't hear my TV when going full blast, but my little dog buries himself under a pillow so that he can sleep.


    John
     
  2. Feb 19, 2017 #102

    DJP

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    I have solved the hearing loss problem by leaving my hearing aids in the carrying case. In the shop I don't need them and when watching TV I use a head set connected to the stereo receiver for custom volume to suit my needs.

    My fancy hearing aids are only useful when attending a play or concert or when visiting friends and family.

    I didn't think that hearing loss in a machine shop where i am the only operator would be considered a disability.
     
  3. Feb 19, 2017 #103

    Blogwitch

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    Excuse me DJP,

    If you had read the previous posts about hearing solutions, you would know that this is nothing to do with working in a workshop but the suppression of Tinnitus.
     
  4. Feb 20, 2017 #104

    ex-Gooserider

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    Only problem with hearing loss in a single operator machine shop is that you can't hear when the MACHINES start 'talking' to you - it is often the case if you are cutting something and you start getting loud noises then there is a problem that should be addressed... I.e. are your feeds & speeds appropriate, or do you have a setup that allows vibration... Ignoring can lead to excess tool wear or breakage, or just less than ideal results... There are workarounds but it is important to be aware of the issue... On the chairs, I have seen friends replace the little small casters on office style chairs with larger diameter 6 or 8" casters (or even bigger) like usually used on equipment carts or dollies - they tell me it makes it much easier to scoot around, especially on shop floors that have lots of chips and other crap on them. The bigger wheels will roll over small obstacles that would stop small wheels...
     
  5. Feb 20, 2017 #105

    DJP

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    Yes, I should have read the entire thread before replying. Tinnitus has been with me since my childhood so I can ignore it. My more recent issue is hearing loss which some consider a disability. Around loud machines hearing protection serves me better than improved hearing.

    The discussion to have is whether machines cause a hearing disability and I think that they do.
     
  6. Nov 19, 2017 #106

    Wolfie01

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    Hi all,
    I am a medically retired HGV driver, my main disability is psoriasis induced Arthritics.
    I've built my own workshop, but ive been adapting my lathe and mill with larger handles and power feeds.
    Enough of my dabbling, look forward to contributing what i can.

    Graham
     
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  7. Nov 19, 2017 #107

    Blogwitch

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    Good on you Graham, at least you haven't given up like a lot of people have to.

    Different set of circumstances for me but the same sorts of problems. For every problem there is a solution for you to carry on just that little bit longer.

    John
     
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  8. Nov 19, 2017 #108

    Wolfie01

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    I'm not one for giving up John lol.
    I always worked, so sitting around doing nothing has driven me nuts, well so the wife tells me.
    I'm in the process of making my own CNC machine to add to my other collection of 9x20 lathe, mini mill, tig welder ect ect lol.
    According to a fb group, I suffer from Chronic Tool Acquisition Syndrome.
     
  9. Nov 19, 2017 #109

    Blogwitch

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    Graham,

    Sometimes you can't help not getting into your shop, it all depends what is wrong with you.

    I too am a toolaholic and have been buying tooling kits like they are going out of fashion, all in the hope I can get through my latest health problem to give me at least a few months on the good side..

    In fact a couple of years ago I spent well over £2.5k on buying everything to make a top of the range middle sized CNC mill (SX2), but have had to give up on it, nothing has been touched, because I know I just don't have the time remaining to finish it, especially since my good friend John Stevenson passed away a few weeks ago, we were going to build the two machines side by side, once we had completely worked out the mechanical bits.

    So sometimes it isn't IF you want to carry on, but whether YOU CAN


    John.
     
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  10. Dec 18, 2017 #110

    Wolfie01

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    Hi John,
    Condolences about your friend.
    I hope your latest health problems are on the mend.
    Its been a fair few weeks since I was last in the workshop, but yesterday I managed a good 4 hrs without any ill effects.
    Everyday in every way, it gets easier and easier by the inch.

    Stay in touch please!

    Graham
     
  11. Dec 18, 2017 #111

    nel2lar

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    Hi All,
    Holiday wishes and a Merry Christmas to all.

    When it get to disabilities the worst to me is pain and I have found the more I do the better I feel. Hearing is something I never paid much attention to and now it's too late. Hearing is one of our senses we really need when running machinery. We can hear when thing are not right and able to do something before it breaks something that could be very costly. I replaced a small pulley and a few days ago it started making a noise I did not like and after looking the pulley was not all that true even being brand new. Life is good and a lot better with just a few hours in the shop.
    Nelson
     
  12. Dec 19, 2017 #112

    nel2lar

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    Gail
    I read you post and was kind of upset by it. There is only one way to run a lathe with disabilities or with out. Running a mill is the same and yes it is nice to have something to just push the button and watch, but in a real world its about what we want and the pain or adjustments to do that. Are they any different than anyone else does it, probability but that is the nice thing about machining metal. There are a lot of rat traps out there and they are all different but they achieve the job they were made to do. I feel the same about working in the shop and I do not believe very much is differs than the normal.
    Going to enjoy it until I can not turn the cranks and handles.
    Happy cutting
    Nelson
     
  13. Aug 13, 2018 #113

    nel2lar

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    Looking at the old post and hit this one and had to update.
    I have a Millrite Mill and all the locks I have extended the handles so it does not take very much pressure to loosen them. On my South Bend 10K I have not come up with anything to assist when threading. Engaging the half nut more than a few times my hand is falling off with pain, any suggestion would be appreciated. Filing is something must be done after milling is something I started using the belt sander. It might be a day soon to just sell all my tools and get a new hobby.
    Happy machining to all.
    Nelson
     
  14. Aug 14, 2018 #114

    nifty1940

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    This is a great forum to bring attention to the abilities of our friends with a disability. Having spent 40 years serving the product needs of function, rehabilitation and exercise to both the disabled and aged sectors, it never fails to amaze me of their contribution and courage in adapting to the facilities, and environment, that we take for granted. Although an old man now, I'm still providing to these sectors. Thank you to the Admin for bringing their skill set to this forum.
     
  15. Aug 14, 2018 #115

    nifty1940

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  16. Aug 15, 2018 #116

    Aragocom

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    Nelson[/QUOTE]
    Would using a swing up threading tool - http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/swing-up-tool-holder.html - and leaving the half nut engaged make it easier ?
     
  17. Aug 15, 2018 #117

    MachineTom

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    If you are having trouble engaging the halfnuts, I would first try an entended handle, with a removable extension. My Rockwell 10 and takes a little pressure to engage the nuts, the Monarch 10EE needs one finger to engage the nuts.
    Suggest you check out other guys 1oK, Ive had both a 9A SB and a 16SB, nether offered a great resistance to engaging the half nuts, May not be operator issue at all.

    I have about normal hand strength, and can curl about 20lbs, to lift above my shoulder i can do 10lbs on the right arm, and 7 on the left. Just a comparison for you.
     
  18. Aug 15, 2018 #118

    DJP

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    Check for friction on the handle shaft that engages the half-nut. Recently my handle got tighter and tighter. The problem was a lock washer and compression nut that were working together to tighten the handle with added friction. Too light may be an issue if the half nut disengages during operation but too heavy makes the machine feel like its fighting back. A machine that becomes dominant can be scary.
     
  19. Aug 15, 2018 #119

    JC54

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    I like this forum, there are a lot of us with disabilities of one sort or another but getting out into "the shed" can make the difference between becoming a vegetable or doing something useful. USEFUL is a vague word with various meanings but to anyone that can get out into "the shed" and make something USEFUL, it means an awful lot... or you could just sit and watch TV!!!!! John.
    I am a full time carer for a severely disabled wife and fighting my own health problems but still enjoying my "shed" time even if progress is very slow.
     
  20. Sep 3, 2018 #120

    nel2lar

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    Would using a swing up threading tool - http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/swing-up-tool-holder.html - and leaving the half nut engaged make it easier ?[/QUOTE]

    Mike
    Yes a swing up would help but that does not stop the carriage from moving. My problem is when the handle hit the stop it causes my arthritis to raise cane. I try to keep my threading to a minimum.
    Thanks
    Nelson
     

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