Why a forum on disabilities?

Discussion in 'Machining with Disabilities' started by GailInNM, Nov 15, 2008.

Help Support HMEM by donating:

  1. Jun 24, 2012 #61

    Allen

    Allen

    Allen

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    55
    You guys are my heroes. Seriously. :bow:

    I'm "lucky" enough my disability doesn't show. -- Hands that tremor, One trick knee that surgery didn't fix (it goes out from under me a coupla times a day with no warning), "sensitized" lungs (many solvents, welding fumes, and acrid smoke all make me cough until I nearly pass out), obstructive sleep apnea (surgery failed and my BiPap is set at the highest setting commercially available), and a heaping side of major depression. None of those things mean I "can't" do stuff, it just means that I can't do it at a pace anybody would pay me for.... And I just love it when the guy behind me at the store assumes I'm a lazy freeloading "raccoon" because he can't "see" anything wrong! :redface2:

    When I do more physical work I try to balance things. I keep a chair or stool handy, Work a bit, rest a bit, work a little more sit until the shaking stops.... I'll get there eventually. Painting or welding requires a fan on high to blow the fumes away from me. (Even some acrylics set me off). Walk away as soon as I start to cough and stay away until the feeling passes... again, I'll get 'er done eventually. :D

    My biggest hurdle though is the depression. There can be days or sometimes even weeks where I just can't get started. Or if I do force myself to get at it, the work is less than stellar, and I end up having to redo much of it on another day. I have some pretty spendy daily meds that help me function until things build up and I shut down again.... Those who have had a bout with deep depression after a loss know what I mean. Mine, however, has decided to take up permanent residence. As a result I usually try to limit my projects to things I can complete between spells. Some I get done, others tend to get rotated to the back burner for weeks, months or even years. It's like procrastination on steroids.

    I should mention, I'm mostly a "fabricator" rather than a machinist. We live in a closetless 2br mobile home, so there's no real room for a lathe even if I had the money for one. I'll sometimes shape parts with a combination of soldering, a milling cutter in a dremel, hand files and a sanding drum mounted in the chuck of the tabletop drill press. I'll not win any prizes for fit or finish, but they mostly work well enough to get by for a while.

    I actually have THREE major projects nearing completion this summer. The little steam roller (http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/index.php?topic=9792.0), an Oil Pull pup (http://www.homemodelenginemachinist.com/index.php?topic=14836.0),
    and an iron wheeled wagon to mount a set of industrial pumps upon. The roller awaits a couple hundred $$ infusion of steel bar and sheet. The pup needs the engine valve seats reground, a brake pedal made, and repaint. The wagon axles are done and we're waiting for two 6x6 wooden sills 12 feet long and a 4x4 tongue to materialize. I was promised the wood would be donated by the first part of July. so I could have the pumps ready to mount by mid month

    And then there are my 1:24 board on board oil field projects. The Pennsylvania standard derrick project has been idle since April. But the South Penn pumping station hasn't been touched since February of 2011! I'd like to have them ready for the Steam Show at Portersville the first weekend in August, but my mojo just isn't cooperating.
    http://www.the-ashpit.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=2239&p=9761&hilit=derrick#p9761
    http://www.the-ashpit.com/mik/southpenn.html

    Looking back, MOST of the stuff I actually got finished in the last couple years were mini projects that took no more than 3 days. A couple G scale (electric)locomotives, some freight cars, and a plastic building kit or two. Maybe the guys who say I'm 'just lazy' are right? I sure work a lot like a dilettante.

    Except when I don't. August 2 is the deadline for the 5 projects I mentioned. I want to have 3 completed (Pup, wagon. pumping station, and the other two presentable. wish me luck!
     
  2. Jun 24, 2012 #62

    Rayanth

    Rayanth

    Rayanth

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Messages:
    338
    Likes Received:
    7
    Allen, I feel we're two peas in a pod, separated it sounds by many long years of life.

    I'm 32, and suffer my own severe bouts of depression. Most days I'm just apathetic, other days it's debilitating, hard to even get out of bed. I have Asperger's syndrome, a mild form of autism that gives me great intellect in some areas (so I'm told), and steals away my ability to have any meaningful social life. I have virtually no sense of balance, and rarely try to make a walk across the room without first checking to look for things I can grab should I start to fall...the cats, I have learned, are not such a thing.

    I am only getting started in my long journey on this hobby, but if there is anything I have learned - it's the journey and not the destination, that makes it all the worthwhile.

    So what if you haven't finished a 'major' project in a long time. You've done something. You've enjoyed it. You've made mistakes, and learned from them; and you've done something you wanted to do - without anyone else telling you that you must do this, or must do that.

    Enjoy your journey. Reaching the destination is just a bonus. It can be a great thing to feel the sense of accomplishment of a finished project - but it can also be a little scary, thinking you have to start a whole new one now. If your projects are for yourself, then there's no real reason to rush.

    Enjoy all that you do, and take it one step at a time. So long as you don't sit idly by, you're better off than those lazy freeloading raccoons.

    - Ryan
     
  3. Jun 29, 2012 #63

    Allen

    Allen

    Allen

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2008
    Messages:
    128
    Likes Received:
    55
    Ryan, Maybe someday those with mental health issues will be afforded the same level of respect (which, all too often, ain't much) as those with other disabilities. Telling a depressed person to "suck it up and get on with life" is EXACTLY like telling someone with a bad leg to "go walk it off".

    Portersville Steam Show's 50th show is the first weekend in August. So I have a firm deadline to get a couple things presentable.... I think tomorrow I might see about getting the derrick plinthed, since I'm waiting on parts for both the roller and Oil Pull pup, and it's supposed to be miserable outside again, anyway.

    Unless something changes, I also have to get the 20th Century ready this weekend for the 4th of July parade in Zelienople. That should be fun!
     
  4. Sep 6, 2012 #64

    Annie

    Annie

    Annie

    Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2009
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    1
    I have an illness which affects my balance and causes me to have very slender reserves of energy so I tire easily. Depression is one of the symptoms of this illness as well, but fortunately I'm on meds which work well for me so I don't get too much in the way of bad days where my mood drops into a hole in the ground. When I was younger I worked around industries where high levels of noise were an everyday thing and at that time there was little awareness of the destructive effects of long term exposure. So my hearing is not what it was, but since I live on my own it's not the problem it once was when I had to live and work around people who failed to understand that I wasn't being rude or difficult when I couldn't tell what it was they were saying.
    Most of the time I do just fine with my projects because I've learned to pace myself and accept that slow and steady wins the day. I've also had to learn that there are some tasks I should not attempt when I'm having a bad fatigue day, using power tools or using my lathe as a couple of examples.
     
  5. Sep 6, 2012 #65

    GailInNM

    GailInNM

    GailInNM

    Administrator Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Messages:
    2,204
    Likes Received:
    331
    Annie,
    I am glad that you found our little disabilities corner of the forum. I sounds like you are finding the right balance of what you can do and what you would like to do. Taking a survey of what we can do and not dwelling on what we can't do has been the key for me. It is hard not to get depressed when we are having a bad day; when I would rather be cutting metal but the order of the day is to sit around petting the shop dog and planning the next good day's progress.

    Keep us informed with progress on your projects. I find that on days when I can't do much building that sharing what I have been doing with others helps keep theinterest up.

    Gail in NM
     
  6. Jul 16, 2013 #66

    Mechanicboy

    Mechanicboy

    Mechanicboy

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2013
    Messages:
    670
    Likes Received:
    223
    To be honest, i am deaf since i was born.. i can not see what is the problem to be deaf in a work environment as a car mechanic ( i am car mechanic and worked near 20 year now). Some time the mechanic in our car work shop asked me where the noise came from to exampe in gear box, engine or other places in the car where the noise is there,.. how can i do it with the noise?? Yes, i am using my hands, body and the stetoscope with steel rod (i has a little rest of hearing, 80% dB in right ear and 120 dB in left ear) + try to drive the car in a tour to learn out where the noise came from. I can answer where the problem with noise can be in the car out of my years of experience. Also no problem to be deaf in a workshop with people who is hearing.

    For some year since the foreman in workshop had tried the car who had problem with gear box. I asked him what was problem with the car, he told the gear box had noise. Then i asked him how he drove the car and how the noise came in and out etc.. The foreman drove the car with noise and disappeared each time when he pressed the clutch pedal down. My answer: Worned ball bearings in gear box. He did not believe me until another mechanic repaired the gearbox and found worn bearings. The reason was that the chairman was a new employee. :)

    It is not too late how to learn out how to search noise in a machinery too example when the people has lost the hearing in the ears later in life.

    Is it someone there in HMEM who is deaf in whole life? Not sure a lot of there.. Nice to meet the folks here who has respect for peoples with disabilities. Never underestimate the folks with disabilities! They may be smarter than you can imagine .. :)
     
  7. Jul 16, 2013 #67

    aarggh

    aarggh

    aarggh

    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2012
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    53
    Mental illnesses do tend to not get a lot of support or sympathy from people, not because they don't care or want to know, but I believe more because it's not something tangible they can see or feel. A leg or arm injury can be like a temporary badge of honour, but unless they have gone through, or know people directly who have gone through mental illness, they have no frame of reference but their own to compare against.

    I never understood how people with ear infections or vertigo could be "that bad off", until I had a very nasty accident that I was extremely lucky to survive, but it left me with a severe case of vertigo for several weeks, that was completely debilitating. After experiencing it myself, the best I can sum it up, is it's like falling in every direction simultaneously, while not being sure whether your sitting, standing, or lying down. If it wasn't for medication, I could barely make it to just sit up in bed. Let alone make it to the lounge room. I now have a very healthy respect for sufferers of vertigo, and what they go through, but without my experience I'd probably be thinking, "so you can't rub your tummy while standing on one leg, so what?"!

    It's all about a frame of reference or being able to relate in the end, although it would be good if people who can't relate, just accept that some people do suffer invisible conditions, and provide at the very least some level of empathy without judgement or ignorant remarks.

    cheers, Ian
     
  8. Jul 17, 2013 #68

    Goldflash

    Goldflash

    Goldflash

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2012
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    22
    I have just read through everyone of these posts and I am humbled by what I have read.
    I had heart problems starting about 3 years ago and for a long while I could not work, and took up model engineering as a form of therapy to keep my mind occupied and stop me feeling sorry for myself.
    Finally after being messed around by the medical profession for a couple of years I had a Triple Bypass at the beginning of this year and its been a hard road getting back physically and mentally to where I want to be.
    This site has been a major source of Inspiration to me during my periods of being ill and postoperative recovery.
    My father was a very keen model engineer right up until he was about 90 and I am positive that spending all those hours in the shed kept him going and he is still going well having just celebrated his 100th birthday.

    Respectfully yours
    Ralph
     
  9. Jul 27, 2013 #69

    Rays

    Rays

    Rays

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    5
    Hi all read some of your amazing tales and I see no one has posted in this section for some time. This could mean no more people are disabled I could only hope!

    I signed up on this forum some time ago in the hope one day I could use the information gained from reading about what many of you do and how you do it. Well I know own a Myford ML7 in excellent condition generally some minor fixes required. I am slowly getting round to these as well as learning as much as I can through reading and more reading on forums as well as little time on the lathe itself.

    I am mainly into woodwork and wood turning it was through an Ornamental Turning or Rose Engine search that originally brought me to this site.

    I'm Ray I have whats called Charcot Marie Tooth CMT and no nothing to do with my teeth LOL. Its a Neuro Muscular thing had it since age 7 (now 57yrs) progressively I have deteriorated because of other health and injuries. You can read more about me over here. http://wheelnroundworkshop.blogspot.com.au/
     
  10. Aug 4, 2013 #70

    Aquarius21

    Aquarius21

    Aquarius21

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2009
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi, three weeks ago I developed a retinal detachment in my right eye which at its worst blocked out 85% of my vision. Now, recovering with a gas bubble ( built in carpenter's level) distortion, straight objects appear wavy, the horizontal is now about 10 degrees off kilter and double vision. So, trying to do layout and other machine work has suddenly gotten far harder for a newbie. I have made a tapping block and now work on a tapping machine.

    However, with the loss of perspective, doing layout complete with punch work for hole drilling etc. is really difficult.

    Can anyone suggest shop helps? Is there a monocular device that can give a binocular view so that one can strike where one ought to? I have the usual round up of magnifiers having beaten my way through two cataract surgeries over a year ago but this setback is tough in that vision could take months even up to two years to improve and even then one might not get it all back. Any advice is greatly welcomed. Drop me an email at quincycollins2011@gmail.com
     
  11. Aug 29, 2013 #71

    landcrsr

    landcrsr

    landcrsr

    Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2010
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hi all, I lost my last job because I had a pesky heart attack (only my 7th) and I'm only 48. I also need both knees replaced and have 1 spinal vertebra radially broken and fused off set, and 5 vertebra collapsing (I was 6' 3" now 6' 1" tall) thanks to heavy industry an the fact I look like a malley bull, always got the big heavy jobs. I have to plan out well in advance if I have to lift anything and or bend over a lot. But I wake up every morning so I carry on and have fun making things in my shed.
     
  12. Dec 11, 2014 #72

    gb16714

    gb16714

    gb16714

    New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2014
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    2
    I am 53 years young and am recouping from a minor foot surgery. the extra time I have on my hands has allowed me to reflect on others with permanent disabilities. first off I feel so inconvenienced by my current state of health and am eager for improvements. I am humbled by the perseverance and silent suffering that disabled people exhibit. I TRUELY RESPECT all of you, and if you are reading this you likely fit this category; Thoughts and prayers to all of you. But a word of caution to all machine tool operators, use caution when operating your equip., follow safe practices, and use all necessary PPE's. (personal protective equipment) In so doing we reduce the likelihood of becoming a statistic. by doing this we will more enjoy our hobby and our loved ones will see our focus on safety and rest more when they hear the big stuff fire up.
    sincerely Greg
     
  13. Dec 19, 2014 #73

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Ex Bogstandard HMEM Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,697
    Likes Received:
    667
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Aeronautical Engineer
    Location:
    Crewe, Cheshire, UK
    About 3 months ago, I was diagnosed with PTSD, stemming back to the nasty escapades I got up to in the mid 70's whilst serving in the armed forces.
    That is nearly 40 years I have been suffering from this debilitating but non visible condition, and had no inkling about what it was doing to me.
    I am now waiting to go into Combat Stress for an intensive residential course to help me with my problems.

    It is only now do I realise how much of a nasty ba****d I must have been for the many years I have been posting on the internet, so if I have upset anyone, please look at me in a different light, it maybe wasn't me, but my nasty past showing itself.

    I have now realised, that if I can eventually get this under control, I should be able to get back into my shop and making things again. Luckily I didn't sell it all off, as I was going to do a few months ago.

    Keep making chips and enjoy it.

    John
     
  14. Dec 20, 2014 #74

    Cogsy

    Cogsy

    Cogsy

    Well-Known Member Staff Member Global Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2012
    Messages:
    2,604
    Likes Received:
    747
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    John,

    I don't know you, in fact I got into this hobby and joined this site just after you decided not to participate here anymore. I have come across your presence online in many instances though (not just here) and the impression I developed over time was that you were 'a bit nasty'.

    I noted your return here with surprise and, frankly, I had decided not to interact with you. However, it appears I was being hasty. Anyone who can admit and address their faults, whatever they may be, deserves a chance at retribution.

    I wish you well in your recovery and I hope you can make it back into your shop in the future. I also look forward to possibly benefiting from your extensive knowledge as well.
     
  15. Dec 20, 2014 #75

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Ex Bogstandard HMEM Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,697
    Likes Received:
    667
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Aeronautical Engineer
    Location:
    Crewe, Cheshire, UK
    Cogsy,
    It was one of the first things that the counsellors told me, think back and try to put right what you think you have done wrong. It will be the only way that I can get back onto the road to recovery.
    I only wish I could have gone back to the 70's and not done the things I did, but being in the military, you didn't really have the choice.

    After having now nearly four years of real bad personal times, which stopped me doing almost anything in my shop, but still buying and collecting, I have so many projects to do, casting sets, plans, projects etc, that if I started now, I would be a centarian before I would be finished. I only hope I can get a few of them done.

    Thanks

    John
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2014
  16. Dec 20, 2014 #76

    MachineTom

    MachineTom

    MachineTom

    Senior Member HMEM Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2010
    Messages:
    894
    Likes Received:
    123
    A very good friend of mine suffers from PTSD, it has been a 40 year old issue for him. Recovery has been slow He goes to therapy every two weeks, avoids crowds, sits back to the wall, close to the door, and more.

    Every day is another chance for you to get better, sometimes its a big step, most often its a little step, as long as its a step, its good.

    Looking forward to you rejoining the forum.

    Tom
     
  17. Dec 31, 2014 #77

    Rays

    Rays

    Rays

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2010
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    5
    Hi all just popped in to wish you all a Happy New Year

    Lets hope for those who suffer any form of condition there is less :fan::wall::hDe:

    More th_wavwoohoo1*discussion*

    and most of all Rof};D

    Keep safe keep well and most of al keep positive.

    Ray
     
  18. Dec 31, 2014 #78

    bazmak

    bazmak

    bazmak

    BAZMAK HMEM Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2012
    Messages:
    2,177
    Likes Received:
    1,200
    Question for Lance corrigan.I too have been a sheetmetal worker for many years and suffer from hearing loss.I can still hear but not fully understand conversation.So lance do you hear at all, or just reduced ?
     
  19. Jan 28, 2015 #79

    goldstar31

    goldstar31

    goldstar31

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,298
    Likes Received:
    510
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Haggis Breeder
    Location:
    Twixt Tyne and Tees
    I'm surprised that there was no reply. What you appear to be suffering from is what was once laughingly caused 'Boiler Makers' Disease'.

    Writing as a disabled ex-serviceman, I would suggest that you find out what level your hearing is from an audiogram. You may have actual damage from noise or just from old age or even medication. If you have had things like malaria drugs, they may have caused damage.

    One thing which sticks out on an audiogram is the tell tail 'turn up' of the end of the graphs which usually indicates noise damage.

    As for hearing speech, there is some benefit from hearing aids which should attempt to fill in the 'hole'.

    Me, for what it is worth, I was exposed to enemy bombs and machine guns in the war and later aircraft engine noise and getting rid of relegated ammunition as a National Serviceman. After, I got involved with British 25 pounders whilst on mountain rescue.

    Hearing after all this? Not a lot but you have my sympathy.

    Cheers

    Norman
     
  20. Jan 28, 2015 #80

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Blogwitch

    Ex Bogstandard HMEM Supporter

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2008
    Messages:
    3,697
    Likes Received:
    667
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Retired Aeronautical Engineer
    Location:
    Crewe, Cheshire, UK
    Machine Tom,
    What you described about your friend is exactly what I am going through.
    Even when mates call around, I always have to sit with my back away from them, or if they go behind me, I have to swivel my chair around to keep sight of them. This is all done without me thinking about it. Even when in the shop, they have to be in my line of sight.
    I went to a family reunion on Monday, it was absolutely terrifying for me until I could get myself tucked into a corner where I could see everyone, or anyone approaching me.
    People think you are being strange, but in fact, if I couldn't have found that balance, I would have had to leave or become hysterical.
    Now thinking back, I can see what I had been doing for nearly 40 years, but never realised it until I started to get treatment only recently.
    Anyway, I am gently getting back into the shop, sorting a few things out and may start one of my smaller projects soon.

    John
     

Share This Page